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Rack vs Back Pack

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Old 06-01-18, 11:56 AM
  #76  
Blaise88
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Does a large Swift Industries Zeitgeist saddlebag with a Carradice quick release support count?
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Old 06-01-18, 05:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Blaise88 View Post
Does a large Swift Industries Zeitgeist saddlebag with a Carradice quick release support count?
Count for what?
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Old 06-01-18, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by GeneO View Post
Count for what?
Does the support count as a rack (joking). Though I also use a Mission Workshop Sanction backpack on cooler days

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Old 06-03-18, 07:54 AM
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I've never much liked what even a smaller pack on the back does for changes in the center of gravity. Above 5lbs or so, I've found a pack's load can shift enough to make ugly changes in balance at exactly the wrong time. Plus, a pack can mean the difference between arriving with a sweaty back and not (which, as a commuter, can mean a lot on certain days).

For me: I much prefer a rack with a "trunk" bag or panniers.
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Old 06-03-18, 10:07 PM
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Try one. Try the other. Neither one is that expensive. Different people like different things.

I was always a rack person. I was never into having a sweaty back, and a bike with a rack full of heavy stuff handles much better than riding a bike with a backpack full of heavy stuff. The pack puts the center of gravity way too high. I was a musician, so I carried a lot of crap around.

Once I realized that most of my mileage was from commuting, I got a proper commuter bike. Light tourer with bombproof wheels, fenders, lights, and racks. I looked like a total dweeb, but it was the right tool for the job. Then I could take the rack off of my road bike I could ride it in the way that God intended.
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Old 06-03-18, 10:35 PM
  #81  
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Rack with a saddle bag w/ fold-out panniers.


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Old 06-04-18, 06:55 AM
  #82  
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I've been using my rack and trunk with fold out panniers which is actually the set up in the photo above that the user posted. I like it but what I do find that I feel the weight over the back wheel and the bike feels sluggish to me unlike when I have the same weight in my backpack. I really noticed it this morning on my ride so I think on Wednesday when I ride I might try my backpack again (GoRuck GR1). What I think I might land on is using my backpack for my work commutes but use my rack and trunk bag more for trips to the farmers market and other type of rides. I think both are good options and it really becomes a matter of personal preference. I am aided that my office has showers so if my back gets all sweaty its not a big deal.
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Old 06-06-18, 05:11 PM
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I agree you get sweaty regardless, and the feel/balance of the bike is way better with the rack setup. The only issue I have found is security of the panniers.
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Old 06-06-18, 09:42 PM
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Originally Posted by akent View Post
I agree you get sweaty regardless, and the feel/balance of the bike is way better with the rack setup. The only issue I have found is security of the panniers.
Never felt a issue with balance with a backpack. I guess you must have to be sitting pretty upright to feel that, or not have your saddle fore-aft adjusted correctly for balance.
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Old 06-07-18, 11:45 PM
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I rode with panniers for a few years, couldn't see riding with a backpack. Moved to a much more temperate climate and I ended up with an ortlieb backpack to commute in with. It's not bad but not great. I do get warm, and I notice it on my shoulders after about 15 miles. The panniers are superior for me on longer rides, but I also get to pick any bike I want in the morning when I'm using the backpack, and if I stop somewhere I don't need to take anything off the bike.
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Old 06-09-18, 09:33 PM
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One thing that I didn't see mentioned (maybe I missed it) is a question about the terrain you'll be riding on. If you'll be on paved roads, panniers and backpacks will both work according to your preferences. Depending on the attachment system, some people I know have had panniers fall off or rattle annoyingly on dirt roads or rough terrain. It depends on the quality of the pannier and rack. Also regarding sweaty backs with backpacks, a good quality pack from a company that only makes backpacks and accessories makes a difference. I use panniers and/or an Osprey Escapist backpack depending on my ride and I'm happy.
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Old 06-09-18, 10:00 PM
  #87  
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I've got racks on some of my bikes, but a backpack is just convenient. I keep my tools and etc in it, and just grab and go for any bike.

I did have a non-patchable flat with my 20" folder a couple of months ago... and only 700c tubes... so it now sports a 700c front tube.

I occasionally bring panniers for things like PIZZA.... and will tie bulky stuff to the rack if necessary,.
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Old 06-10-18, 01:28 AM
  #88  
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If you have anything heavy, panniers are best because it keeps the weight down low. If it's just clothing and is a light load, there's not much in it, its just personal choice. I would never want anything hard in a backpack though, because if/when you come off it can injure your spine. Heavy loads or hard loads should be in panniers, IMHO
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Old 06-10-18, 10:38 AM
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I would suggest using a trunk with a large main compartment for your lunch, Velcro straps for a mini pump, and has side pockets for tools/tube. This way you can use a small backpack just to hold a change of clothes and you won't get that sore feeling from biking several km whilst carrying a heavy load on your back.
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Old 06-10-18, 08:31 PM
  #90  
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
I've got racks on some of my bikes, but a backpack is just convenient. I keep my tools and etc in it, and just grab and go for any bike.

I did have a non-patchable flat with my 20" folder a couple of months ago... and only 700c tubes... so it now sports a 700c front tube.

I occasionally bring panniers for things like PIZZA.... and will tie bulky stuff to the rack if necessary,.
An insulated pizza carrier rack/top accessory would be the thing.
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Old 06-10-18, 09:55 PM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by Archwhorides View Post

An insulated pizza carrier rack/top accessory would be the thing.
I picked these up. They are a a bit funky and floppy, but a pizza sized trunk bag on top. I can carry about 6 frozen pizzas inside. I assume at least one boxed hot pizza.



I think I've also seen a more commercial version of panniers with an integrated trunk box that probably would work on Amazon? Hmmm...

Maybe it was this one.

https://www.aliexpress.com/item/2016...666673403.html

I don't have it, so I'm not sure if it is roomy enough. It would be close.

If not, one could make a custom top bag for a pizza. Perhaps I'll have to keep an eye out for one of those insulated pizza sleeves.
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Old 06-15-18, 10:12 AM
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I've used a messenger bag for over 60k cumulative miles of commuting. Once the bag is on my back and I am riding I don't even notice it.
I carry a laptop and change of clothing - 13lbs.
This works for me as my weekend roadie bike is my commuter too and I prefer a quick ride.
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Old 06-15-18, 06:25 PM
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For me it's rack/panniers all the way too.
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Old 06-15-18, 09:00 PM
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Here is what I use in the summer months for 32+ mi RT commute in Chicagoland where it was 93F and humid today. Fairly cool. I never notice them until I take them off.
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Old 06-15-18, 09:24 PM
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Yeah I have been debating this myself... I was thinking about throwing the giants rack on the back of the anyroad. Then get a nice little bag to sit on top to make quick store runs / red box runs, without needing a backpack. Iím still debating with myself. Lol
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Old 06-16-18, 07:14 AM
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I personally prefer a proper backpack. To me I like the option of easily shedding the weight when I don't need it.

I use a military style day pack with cinch straps, so the stuff in my bag doesn't move around and the bag is fitted properly to were I hardly notice it.
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Old 06-20-18, 09:59 AM
  #97  
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Originally Posted by Speedoape View Post
any thoughts? Seems to be some nice back packs out there. I know in Houston I will get sweaty but thatís going to happen anyways.
Bikes today look so sleek and nice Iíd like to keep that look and maybe wear a pack?
Or, am I just hosing myself in the long run?
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In my experience there are drawbacks to both. A backback can do a number on you back while riding and makes you sweat more. A rack changes how the bike feels completely by making the back end super heavy.

If you are carrying a light load I would say go with a backpack. If not, a cargo rack is the way to go.
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Old 06-20-18, 10:59 AM
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I did a 25 mi commute the other day in 94F but heat index about 100F with my Osprey backpack. I didn't notice it - my head felt really hot though. YMMV.
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