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How to increase bicycle top speed.

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How to increase bicycle top speed.

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Old 06-20-18, 12:16 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by wgscott View Post
Wile E.C. was a Logical Positivist. Gravity never kicked in until he looked down.
Dude could will himself to not adhere to the Earth's gravitational pull...but paint a black rectangle on a big rock and he'd run into it full speed thinking it was a tunnel every time.

Man he was a good time
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Old 06-20-18, 12:21 PM
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Originally Posted by wphamilton View Post
I don't know if you're pulling our leg or not, but in case you aren't there's a point that you're missing. With your example of 48/14 and 26" wheel, you'd already be going faster than you can probably handle at even 100 rpm cadence. On a standard road bike, even with a compact crankset, the top end is already much faster than you can push it. So the whole screed is basically irrelevant to increasing bicycle speed. Unless you have a cruiser with, again, abnormally low gear inches.

If you're one of the 99.whatever percent of cyclists, you're going to increase your bicycle top speed by 1) increasing the power you can put out, and 2) improving your aerodynamic drag profile, and NOT by increasing your gear inches.
The article above is straight forward, and just describes some distances using inches/feet/miles, rather than the graphs that use gear inches.

One of the main points in the the article at top of page, is getting a higher top speed (typically on a flat road without much grade), without using an awkwardly high pedal cadence, such as 275rpm. You discuss 100rpm. However, 100 rpm may be getting near the awkward rpm range. I am perhaps suggesting using a more casual reduced pedal cadence of about 60rpm or less, while perhaps using the same exact pressure that is needed for the rider to step up stairs. And because sitting is optional, perhaps the rider is standing for the duration of the ride, instead of sitting on the seat and rubbing it in. Standing would also give more stepping weight on the pedals ? If a standing position is used, a standing position could be comfortable with lifted handlebars, such as handle bars with a 9" rise, or bmx handle bars. Regardless of riding position, the result is that the bike goes faster with the same/less pedal rpm using the larger chainrings and smaller rear cogs.

It should be noted that the weight of the rider may also effect the bicycles top speed. For example, a person weighing 300 pounds could more easily use larger chainrings than a person that weighs 100 pounds. And a person that weights 300 pounds probably could start out from a complete stop with the chain on a larger chainring, and could use that 300 pounds to get the bicycle quickly up to 40mph on the larger chainrings using the same pedal cadence of about 50-60 pedal rpm. A person weighing 100 pounds would probably need to do alot of shifting before getting up to the 40mph. And where wind drag may stop a person weighing 300 pounds from going faster than 70mph, the wind drag may stop the person weighing 100 pounds from going faster than about 45mph ? But that is just comparing two different weights. A person weighing 100 pounds could still go faster using larger chainrings and smaller rear cogs.

p.s. the article above describes tires with the following sizes: 20", 24", 27", 27.5", and 29".

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Old 06-20-18, 01:04 PM
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Originally Posted by FRIEND OF GOD View Post
The article above is straight forward, and just describes some distances using inches/feet/miles, rather than the graphs that use gear inches.

One of the main points in the the article at top of page, is getting a higher top speed (typically on a flat road without much grade), without using an awkwardly high pedal cadence, such as 275rpm. You discuss 100rpm. However, 100 rpm may be getting near the awkward rpm range. I am perhaps suggesting using a more casual reduced pedal cadence of about 60rpm or less, while perhaps using the same exact pressure that is needed for the rider to step up stairs. And because sitting is optional, perhaps the rider is standing for the duration of the ride, instead of sitting on the seat and rubbing it in. Standing would also give more stepping weight on the pedals ? If a standing position is used, a standing position could be comfortable with lifted handlebars, such as handle bars with a 9" rise, or bmx handle bars. Regardless of riding position, the result is that the bike goes faster with the same/less pedal rpm using the larger chainrings and smaller rear cogs.

It should be noted that the weight of the rider may also effect the bicycles top speed. For example, a person weighing 300 pounds could more easily use larger chainrings than a person that weighs 100 pounds. And a person that weights 300 pounds probably could start out from a complete stop with the chain on a larger chainring, and could use that 300 pounds to get the bicycle quickly up to 40mph on the larger chainrings using the same pedal cadence of about 50-60 pedal rpm. A person weighing 100 pounds would probably need to do alot of shifting before getting up to the 40mph. And where wind drag may stop a person weighing 300 pounds from going faster than 70mph, the wind drag may stop the person weighing 100 pounds from going faster than about 45mph ? But that is just comparing two different weights. A person weighing 100 pounds could still go faster using larger chainrings and smaller rear cogs.

p.s. the article above describes tires with the following sizes: 20", 24", 27", 27.5", and 29".

Thanks

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Just curious, why did you post this thread?

A lot of the ribbing your getting is likely because telling cyclists about gearing is a bit like telling balloonists about hot air. I think you're preaching to the converted.
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Old 06-20-18, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by FRIEND OF GOD View Post
The article above is straight forward, and just describes some distances using inches/feet/miles, rather than the graphs that use gear inches.

One of the main points in the the article at top of page, is getting a higher top speed (typically on a flat road without much grade), without using an awkwardly high pedal cadence, such as 275rpm. You discuss 100rpm. However, 100 rpm may be getting near the awkward rpm range. I am perhaps suggesting using a more casual reduced pedal cadence of about 60rpm or less, while perhaps using the same exact pressure that is needed for the rider to step up stairs. And because sitting is optional, perhaps the rider is standing for the duration of the ride, instead of sitting on the seat and rubbing it in. Standing would also give more stepping weight on the pedals ? If a standing position is used, a standing position could be comfortable with lifted handlebars, such as handle bars with a 9" rise, or bmx handle bars. Regardless of riding position, the result is that the bike goes faster with the same/less pedal rpm using the larger chainrings and smaller rear cogs.

It should be noted that the weight of the rider may also effect the bicycles top speed. For example, a person weighing 300 pounds could more easily use larger chainrings than a person that weighs 100 pounds. And a person that weights 300 pounds probably could start out from a complete stop with the chain on a larger chainring, and could use that 300 pounds to get the bicycle quickly up to 40mph on the larger chainrings using the same pedal cadence of about 50-60 pedal rpm. A person weighing 100 pounds would probably need to do alot of shifting before getting up to the 40mph. And where wind drag may stop a person weighing 300 pounds from going faster than 70mph, the wind drag may stop the person weighing 100 pounds from going faster than about 45mph ? But that is just comparing two different weights. A person weighing 100 pounds could still go faster using larger chainrings and smaller rear cogs.

p.s. the article above describes tires with the following sizes: 20", 24", 27", 27.5", and 29".

Thanks

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Very interesting. Could you expand on the bolded section? I weigh 160lbs, so interpolating from your statement, could I expect to go 50mph?
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Old 06-20-18, 01:57 PM
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I saw what our "FRIEND'" needs the other day. I was going uphill, moderate speed. Saw that a guy was gaining on me, Well, he passed me quite quickly, full kit. full on road bike with a big battery and audible motor. One of the fastest E-bike passes I've seen.

FRIEND's challenge is that with all his math tables, he is still stuck with the same engine. You can pull all the gearing and tire/wheel tricks in the book with your VW bug but until you lift the trunk lid and start messing with the engine, it will never be a world beater.

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Old 06-20-18, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Very interesting. Could you expand on the bolded section? I weigh 160lbs, so interpolating from your statement, could I expect to go 50mph?
It sounds like you could, if you carry a backpack full of free weights, and have a big enough chainring to handle the weight.
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Old 06-20-18, 05:15 PM
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Originally Posted by FRIEND OF GOD View Post
The article above is straight forward, and just describes some distances using inches/feet/miles, rather than the graphs that use gear inches.

One of the main points in the the article at top of page, is getting a higher top speed (typically on a flat road without much grade), without using an awkwardly high pedal cadence, such as 275rpm...
I'd be happy to see someone demonstrate your straightforward method gaining top speed. Just fire up Strava, take some pictures, and post it all here.
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Old 06-20-18, 05:19 PM
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Here's what you need:
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Old 06-20-18, 08:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
Pfft...

My good friend Wile E.C. made his bike faster by strapping a rocket to his back. He got them real cheap from the Acme Co. He almost always ended up hurt when he did that. But he was fast!

He never could catch this neighborhood runner though....fast dude.
”Sheer genius!”
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Old 06-21-18, 10:36 AM
  #35  
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This is how you increase speed.

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Old 06-21-18, 11:12 AM
  #36  
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No matter what gear you're in, and no matter what bike you're on, the way to go faster is to pedal faster.
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Old 06-22-18, 08:22 AM
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When I hit 300rpm on my bike that is usually about Vr. Then I just tilt the nose up and climb to whatever altitude ATC gives me.
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Old 06-22-18, 08:40 AM
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i thought the best way was to pedal faster!
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Old 06-22-18, 11:32 AM
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John Howard got to 150mph wheelsucking behind Don Vesco in a special race car, on the Bonneville salt flats.
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Old 06-22-18, 04:28 PM
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Old 06-23-18, 04:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
Just curious, why did you post this thread?

A lot of the ribbing your getting is likely because telling cyclists about gearing is a bit like telling balloonists about hot air. I think you're preaching to the converted.
The article at the top of the page is perhaps most useful for those not already familiar with the top speed of a bicycle being effected by the tire size, chainring size, and cog size on freewheels/freehubs.

Also, can you post a link to a chart anywhere that displays what the article discusses ? You can post numerous pages about gear inches, but how about what was discussed in the article ?

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Old 06-23-18, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by FRIEND OF GOD View Post
The article at the top of the page is perhaps most useful for those not already familiar with the top speed of a bicycle being effected by the tire size, chainring size, and cog size on freewheels/freehubs.

Also, can you post a link to a chart anywhere that displays what the article discusses ? You can post numerous pages about gear inches, but how about what was discussed in the article ?

Thanks

- ANOTHER GOOD DAY WITH GOD
The "article" is riddled with erroneous information about things like bicycle frames, and the information about what combination of cadence, wheel size and gearing produces what speed is found lots of places. Here's one that popped up on top of the first google search I made:

BikeCalc.com - Speed at all Cadences for any Gear and Wheel


I think anyone who went at least to junior high school or owned a multispeed bike understands the basic concept of gearing and how to figure circumference from diameter. What your "article" seems to miss is that people don't have a sense for cadence any more than they have a sense for MPH, so regardless of all the math, translating one to the other is pointless without a measuring device.

The other problem with the "article" is that it conflates gearing with output, as if top speed on a bike is an equipment problem rather than a wind resistance problem. Some of the examples of gearing in the "article" are preposterous, which is why they are never used.
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Old 06-23-18, 04:49 PM
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Originally Posted by caloso View Post
Very interesting. Could you expand on the bolded section? I weigh 160lbs, so interpolating from your statement, could I expect to go 50mph?
The 70mph and 45mph speeds in the comment are entirely approximate, however, a person weighing 300 pounds probably has more muscle than the person that weighs 100 pounds, and therefore, that extra muscle can probably push the bicycle faster past the point of the wind resistance that would limit the top speed of the person weighing 100 pounds.

If you want to check the top possible speed for yourself, while using a "walking" pedal cadence, such as 40, 50, or 60 rpm, then you would just need to adjust the tire/chainring/cog sizes appropriately until the wind resistance prevented you from increasing the bicycle speed any more, and then, at that exact point in time, check the speedometer that is on the bicycle.

As for Myself, I just noticed that I could start out fairly easily, from a stopped position, in the top gear on a bicycle with 29" tires, and a 48/14 chainring, and that it was fairly easy to get to top speed with a "walking" pedal cadence, and that if I wanted to increase My top speed any more without adjusting the tires/chainrings/cogs, that I would need to increase the "walking" pedal cadence, to "jogging/running" on the pedals.

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Old 06-23-18, 04:53 PM
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Originally Posted by FRIEND OF GOD View Post
The 70mph and 45mph speeds are entirely approximate, however, a person weighing 300 pounds probably has more muscle than the person that weight 100 pounds, and therefore, that extra muscle can probably push the bicycle faster past the point of the wind resistance that would limit the top speed of the person weighing 100 pounds.

If you want to check the top speed for yourself, while using a slower step-by-step pedal cadence, such as 40, 50, or 60 rpm, then you would just need to adjust the tire/chainring/cog sizes appropriately until the wind resistance prevented you from increasing the bicycle speed any more, and at that exact point in time, check the speedometer on the bicycle.

As for Myself, I just noticed that I could start out fairly easily, from a stopped position, in the top gear on a bicycle with 29" tires, and a 48/14 chainring, and that it was fairly easy to get to top speed with a casual pedal cadence, and that if I wanted to increase the top speed any more without adjusting the tires/chainrings/cogs, that I would need to increase the pedal cadence from "walking" on the pedals, to "jogging/running" on the pedals.

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Your posts read like you just 'discovered' the bicycle yesterday and are trying to share the experience with people who have never seen one. This may not be the forum to do so - especially when you are using examples so divorced from the reality that the many cyclists here are so intimate with.
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Old 06-23-18, 05:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Bandera View Post
Q: Why is God wearing that Molteni jersey?
A: He thinks he's Eddie Merckx.

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Exactly.
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Old 06-23-18, 05:18 PM
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Pedal like freakin' crazy and hug the downgrades, baby.
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Old 06-23-18, 05:35 PM
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I guess LSD is getting popular again.
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Old 06-23-18, 05:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
The "article" is riddled with erroneous information about things like bicycle frames
The article at the top of the page is perhaps more for persons less familiar with bicycles than yourself.

When the "article" says "the top tube on many bicycle frames for 29" tires will ride very high", the comment is for those persons who may just try grabbing the first 29" bike off the shelf.

When the article says "the bicycle frame, at the rear wheel, may limit the size of the chainrings that can be put onto the crankset", the comment is suggesting that large chainrings may rub against the frame.

the information about what combination of cadence, wheel size and gearing produces what speed is found lots of places. Here's one that popped up on top of the first google search I made ...
That link you provided just allows one particular tire size to be entered at a time.

The "conclusion" in the article at the top of the page, also compares several different tire sizes for a side by side comparison.

For example, for every 1 mile, on a standard off-the-shelf 29" bicycle, the 24" and 27" would do 1.05 miles and 1.28 miles, using the same pedal cadence. (if given 29" 48/14 = 1 mile, then the 24" 48/11 = 1.05, and the 27" 52/11 = 1.28 miles).

Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
I think anyone who went at least to junior high school or owned a multispeed bike understands the basic concept of gearing and how to figure circumference from diameter. What your "article" seems to miss is that people don't have a sense for cadence any more than they have a sense for MPH, so regardless of all the math, translating one to the other is pointless without a measuring device.
Perhaps the "article" should be edited, and describe pedal cadence in terms of "walking" on the pedals, "jogging" on the pedals, "running" on the pedals, and "sprinting" on the pedals.

The "article" offers a suggestion for getting more speed using the same pace of "walking" on the pedals, rather than needing to increase the pace to "running" or "sprinting" on the pedals.

Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
The other problem with the "article" is that it conflates gearing with output, as if top speed on a bike is an equipment problem rather than a wind resistance problem. Some of the examples of gearing in the "article" are preposterous, which is why they are never used.
Different persons can reach different wind resistances ? What gearing in the "article" do you suggest is preposterous ?

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Old 06-23-18, 05:52 PM
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Dude, ya still gots to pedal faster.
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Old 06-23-18, 06:50 PM
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Originally Posted by FRIEND OF GOD View Post
Different persons can reach different wind resistances ? What gearing in the "article" do you suggest is preposterous ?
No one uses 58t chainrings. 14t isn't the standard high gear for an MTB. I don't know where "the author" got those ideas.

Why would anyone need to compare different wheel sizes? Are they going to change their wheels?

Anyway, the "article" is silly and doesn't tell cyclists (the people who populate this forum) anything they don't know already. No one here needs to know how to make their BMX bike go the same speed as their MTB at the same cadence - that's not the way those bicycles are ridden.

We can argue about the individual points, but your "article" is highly unlikely to be of interest to anyone except as humor.
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