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Drop bars or straights?

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Drop bars or straights?

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Old 07-10-18, 10:04 AM
  #26  
DanBraden
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Those Ergon Grips may very well be a pre-req for any flat handle bars in MY little world of commuting. They're well worth the price! When I use bikes that don't have em, things get tingly real quick.
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Old 07-10-18, 10:09 AM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
Flat bars don't have to be any wider than shoulder width either.

The important thing around peds (and cars/trucks and everything else) is giving them lots of room. If a few inches of bar length makes a difference you're too close.
I have several long climbs that are best done on the sidewalk next to a very busy 4 lane road. The sidewalk is also wide and busy. I'm riding at nearly walking pace because of the steep hill. Buy a few less inches of potential interference with distracted pedestrians is worthwhile where I ride.
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Old 07-10-18, 10:22 AM
  #28  
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Well obviously flat bars are more maneuverable in close quarters, which is why crit racers always use flat bars.
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Old 07-10-18, 10:53 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by Kontact View Post
I have several long climbs that are best done on the sidewalk next to a very busy 4 lane road. The sidewalk is also wide and busy. I'm riding at nearly walking pace because of the steep hill. Buy a few less inches of potential interference with distracted pedestrians is worthwhile where I ride.
If this is your concern then you should get flat bars and cut 'em down to "buy" a few less inches still.
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Old 07-10-18, 11:11 AM
  #30  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
If this is your concern then you should get flat bars and cut 'em down to "buy" a few less inches still.
I suppose if I wanted to create a bike that was good for riding busy uphill sidewalks, and nothing else. Maybe it could have special geometry that is only useful on 15% grades?

But I ride my bikes other places and see no point in a mountain bike with too-short bars or a road bike with one hand position.

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Old 07-10-18, 11:43 AM
  #31  
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I'm not interested in converting anyone on their choice of bars, just standing by my original comment regarding bar width because it's true:

"Flat bars don't have to be any wider than shoulder width"

So while someone can say they like drop bars for other reasons, bar width can't be one of them. Flat bars provide the ultimate in width adjustability.
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Old 07-10-18, 05:44 PM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
3rd door , figure 8 bend trekking bars , you can keep* all the control levers on your rock hopper.. offers another multiple hand position variety.. *saves money

Jones bars another pop thing for MTB.

I have straight bars and Ergon Grip/bar ends on a couple bikes too..
...

Yeah the jones bars and trekking bars are intriguing. I may look into those
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Old 07-30-18, 07:48 PM
  #33  
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Drop bars are uncomfortable, and any "aero" advantage is more than offset by the load most commuters carry. Additionally, being upright where it's easier to quickly look any direction is very important in traffic. Save the drop bars for the Tour de France.
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Old 07-31-18, 11:43 AM
  #34  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
Flat bars don't have to be any wider than shoulder width either.

The important thing around peds (and cars/trucks and everything else) is giving them lots of room. If a few inches of bar length makes a difference you're too close.
You wouldn’t enjoy my commute one bit.

I like like shoulder width flat bars with trigger shifters for the street fighting parts of my ride where control is paramount , drops are great for the mellow parts.
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Old 07-31-18, 11:56 AM
  #35  
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Each person is different, and there is no one answer that fits everyone.

I've ridden almost exclusively drop bars since I was about 10 years old, and they are very comfortable for me.

My new brakes are extremely strong and secure (Campy SR levers, Ultegra 6800 calipers).

I ride a variety of bikes, almost all with drop bars. But for flat out riding, the road bike takes the cake.
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Old 07-31-18, 11:57 AM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by Archwhorides View Post


You wouldn’t enjoy my commute one bit.


Maybe, maybe not, but I certainly wouldn't encourage or allow drivers to be mere inches from my handlebars, no matter how wide or narrow they are.

If a lane is too narrow to safely share then I hold a position that deters sharing it with motor traffic... as prescribed in the vehicle code.
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Old 07-31-18, 08:24 PM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by AlmostTrick View Post
Maybe, maybe not, but I certainly wouldn't encourage or allow drivers to be mere inches from my handlebars, no matter how wide or narrow they are.

If a lane is too narrow to safely share then I hold a position that deters sharing it with motor traffic... as prescribed in the vehicle code.
“Holding the lane” when there are three lines of traffic moving at 4 mph with no bike lane is a fine concept. I’ll stick with shoulder width bars and keep my pace, there’s a lot of cars to pass.
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Old 07-31-18, 10:03 PM
  #38  
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I’ve used both. I’m almost ready to try a Jones or Moloko.

Bike share bikes seem to work fine in traffic with flat handlebars
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