Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Think I may have to give up commuting.

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Think I may have to give up commuting.

Old 11-23-18, 03:39 AM
  #26  
Daniel4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,037
Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 705 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 24 Times in 16 Posts
I've had some mysterious knee pain over the years that seem to have gone now.

Once I was playing golf with my son and his friend when they were still in high school. We didn't rent a cart. Sometime past the nineth hole I had really bad knee pain and let others play through.

This past September I woke up Saturday morning with a knee pain. I couldn't walk without a limp. By Monday it was all good.

It would be a real shame if somebody had to give up cycling because of a developed physical limitatons. For every person who has to give up cycling, we hope one or more physically able person who needs only to travel 10 km or less can get out of his car and cycle comute too.

Last edited by Daniel4; 11-23-18 at 03:44 AM.
Daniel4 is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 03:45 AM
  #27  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,947
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 813 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Things that caused me issues:
- Clipless pedals (yeah not a problem for everyone but they were for me).
Not all clipless nor all cleat installs are created equal.
I eventually discovered that I "had" to angle my toes out a fair bit to be comfortable.
Hadn't been an obvious thought to me.
But I'm "lucky" that my anatomy is fairly symmetrical. Getting that fit right was fairly easy as soon as I realized it needed adjusting.
Some need very different angles left/right, which generally take more effort to figure out.
And then there's the degree of float as allowed by the pedals.
And canting.
dabac is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 05:13 AM
  #28  
Sintern
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Posts: 5
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
ALso have troubles with knees. Just try to rest for few days. If it doesn't help, visit the doc
Sintern is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 01:06 PM
  #29  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,313
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 432 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Not all clipless nor all cleat installs are created equal.
I eventually discovered that I "had" to angle my toes out a fair bit to be comfortable.
Hadn't been an obvious thought to me.
But I'm "lucky" that my anatomy is fairly symmetrical. Getting that fit right was fairly easy as soon as I realized it needed adjusting.
Some need very different angles left/right, which generally take more effort to figure out.
And then there's the degree of float as allowed by the pedals.
And canting.
I went to 2 different fitters, tried multiple different cleat systems (shimano spd's, time atac's, crank brothers, speedplays). Different foot beds, shims, different shoes...all for what? When I look back at how much effort, time, and money I put into trying to make clipless work it's a bit embarrassing. I'm not racing. Clipless does not make you faster or more efficient in regular riding.

Clipless is a perfectly good system but if you're having issues that would go away if you went to good flats - there's no reason to go overboard trying to make it work.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 01:16 PM
  #30  
alias5000
Raised a new winter bike
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Ontario
Posts: 464

Bikes: HP Velotechnik Streetmachine GTE, 2015 Devinci Silverstone SL4, 2012 Cannondale Road Tandem 2, 2007 Trek 6000, Circe Morpheus

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by NiGoCo View Post
I'm using flat pedals.
To all those discussing clipless pedals, the OP is using flat pedals.
alias5000 is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 02:51 PM
  #31  
acidfast7
Banned
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: England / CPH
Posts: 8,585

Bikes: 2010 Cube Acid / 2013 Mango FGSS

Mentioned: 42 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1053 Post(s)
Liked 29 Times in 24 Posts
Originally Posted by alias5000 View Post
To all those discussing clipless pedals, the OP is using flat pedals.
That's good as clipless or clip-in pedals require too much hassle for most commuters.
acidfast7 is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 06:33 PM
  #32  
NiGoCo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NiGoCo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 100

Bikes: Couple junkers

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ferten View Post
Sometimes I wonder if knee pain is due to athritis or bad eating habits. I remember having knee pain on my left knee sometimes when I bike. Sometimes, there's no warning at all. There would just be a really sharp pain out of nowhere. But it has been four yers since then and my knee has gotten much better. Never went to the doctor or anything. Just waited it out.
I know that some foods are very inflammatory. Over the last couple months I've tried to eliminate or at least limit the amount of them that I'm eating while increasing my intake of foods that are anti-inflammatory in nature. You can drive yourself crazy if you really take a good close look at your diet. On the plus side I've lost 13 pounds just by changing my diet and in general I feel a lot better than I did. But my damaged knees I'm afraid won't be fixed by diet changes and rest. I rested them for many years until I wanted to ride a bike around the neighborhood with my son. I tried to just ride through the pain but it was too much and I was only able to do that after two rounds of cortisone shots. And now I'm afraid I've pushed them too far again.
NiGoCo is offline  
Old 11-23-18, 09:04 PM
  #33  
travelinhobo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: No certain place. Catch me when you can.
Posts: 352

Bikes: I'm not a guy - brand doesn't matter.

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 166 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My knees went South after 8.5 years of biking. Went to 2 doctors, both which said I didn't need surgery, one who recommended physical therapy. Got off the bike for a number of years when I went to live overseas, but was still doing the same repetitious movements using g the subway. The aching got real bad and I went to an alternative practitioner who fixed them. They have never returned to the point they were at. Three years ago I did more online research and started taking Cod liver oil pills. They became my little magic pill. I highly recommend them. I've switched recently to fish oil pills and feel no difference (they're cheaper).
travelinhobo is offline  
Old 11-24-18, 05:59 AM
  #34  
dabac
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,947
Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 813 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
.... Clipless does not make you faster or more efficient in regular riding.
My regular riding is 1/3 city center, 2/3 suburbs. I do think Iím a bit faster with clipless.
Itís so much easier to take off from standstill. Simply lift the clicked-in foot and itís in the powerstroke. Instant launch.
Really though, the benefit to me isnít any extra seconds shaved off the travel time, but the ease of use.

Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
Clipless is a perfectly good system but if you're having issues that would go away if you went to good flats - there's no reason to go overboard trying to make it work.
Well, sure. Clipless arenít mandatory. If there is more to lose than to gain, then they lose their point.
dabac is offline  
Old 11-25-18, 07:48 PM
  #35  
PaulRivers
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Posts: 6,313
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 432 Post(s)
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by dabac View Post
My regular riding is 1/3 city center, 2/3 suburbs. I do think I’m a bit faster with clipless.
It’s so much easier to take off from standstill. Simply lift the clicked-in foot and it’s in the powerstroke. Instant launch.
Really though, the benefit to me isn’t any extra seconds shaved off the travel time, but the ease of use.

I disagree...but as another poster point out -

Originally Posted by alias5000 View Post
To all those discussing clipless pedals, the OP is using flat pedals.
There's no reason to derail this thread on a topic that - per the OP's response - isn't relevant.

Last edited by PaulRivers; 11-25-18 at 07:55 PM.
PaulRivers is offline  
Old 11-26-18, 08:36 AM
  #36  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,144

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 419 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5365 Post(s)
Liked 79 Times in 62 Posts
I've had bad knees since I was 24, and I'm 57! I manage. Like @CliffordK, they get worse when I stop cycling, oddly enough, but cycling in bad form can also hurt. Basically, I'm just careful. Doing the right exercises and the things @dabac mentions.

And if you think an e-bike might be right for you, consider that you've already proven you don't need a four wheel overpowered vehicle, so that's great already. An e-bike can be a wonderful thing, and you can also get exercise from it if you choose to.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

ďWhen man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.Ē ó Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 11-30-18, 02:16 PM
  #37  
physdl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Puget Sound Area
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A few thoughts from someone just getting back into bike commuting after 2 years off due to knee injuries.
  1. If you haven't already, I'd highly recommend seeing a physical the******. I used to commute regularly, then took some time off, then, after getting back into it I had symptoms similar to yours. The pain started with hills and progressed to flat surfaces. I'd never had any knee injuries, but a sports medicine doctor suggested I go to physical therapy for a few weeks, and I was back to riding with basically no pain within a few weeks. There are certain exercises that can really help alleviate pain.
  2. If you can find one, go see a the****** who specializes in biking. I ended up spending over a year in PT due to a subsequent car crash injuring the same knee and the person I ended up seeing was amazing (his idea of fun was riding the steepest hill around 10 times in a row when I could barely get up it once). Beyond providing a bike fitting (and understanding how changes will affect the knees), he worked with me to correct my technique and get the right exercises. The other PT I saw was good and succeeded with my relatively mild overuse injury, but just didn't have the experience if anything was harder than expected.
  3. If you're willing to travel, there are doctors who specialize in patellofemoral pain. The difference for me was that the specialist I saw thought about things and came up with the right diagnosis that was outside of her field while the local orthopedic surgeon I saw just followed a set script no matter the evidence presented before him because I just had knee pain.
  4. E-bikes are awesome. I just invested in one so that I could get back to bike commuting. I get at least half of my normal workout (and can do as much or as little as I want), travel twice as fast, and am able to do it every day from the start rather than having to train for weeks to bike commute more than half the time. I upgraded my bike using a mid-drive motor (BBS02) and it's really been a treat. It's definitely easier on my knees, particularly on the constant hills we have here in Seattle. Plus, it gives you the option to get as much assistance as you need - if you're feeling great, turn it down and do most of the work yourself. But if you knees are painful that day, ramp up the power and still bike to work.
physdl is online now  
Old 11-30-18, 06:34 PM
  #38  
Phamilton
Gone
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ft Wayne, IN
Posts: 1,026
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Weak knees and no adductors in left leg. Best I can do is use flat pedals, stretch, do squats, and watch technique carefully. Iím commuting 2+ hrs a day, every day unless roads are icy. Moving saddle back and down and spinning rather than mashing made a bigger difference for me than all the preventative stuff but I still pay for it if I go too long without. Saddle height was the single biggest factor for me.
Oh, yeah, also worth mention is that I have a desk job and am not very active off the bike. Those two can cause big issues.
Phamilton is offline  
Old 12-05-18, 05:03 PM
  #39  
NiGoCo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NiGoCo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 100

Bikes: Couple junkers

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
So my yearly checkup is next month. That's when I'm going to bring this up to my doctor. But what I'm wondering is what would be a reasonable expectation?

​​​​​​Should I expect to be able to ride 8 miles twice a day without knee pain? Or is that just to much to ask for?

I haven't ridden since I posted this. My knees are still hurting even worse. Now my right knee has pain with normal walking.

I am willing to do whatever I need to do to get my knees back. I'm just not sure if that's even a reasonable expectation.
NiGoCo is offline  
Old 12-05-18, 05:35 PM
  #40  
Baboo 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Shawnee, KS
Posts: 230

Bikes: Bike Friday NWT, Rans Stratus, Cannondale R500, trek 720 multitrack, Rockhopper

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Originally Posted by NiGoCo View Post
So my yearly checkup is next month. That's when I'm going to bring this up to my doctor. But what I'm wondering is what would be a reasonable expectation?

​​​​​​Should I expect to be able to ride 8 miles twice a day without knee pain? Or is that just to much to ask for?

I haven't ridden since I posted this. My knees are still hurting even worse. Now my right knee has pain with normal walking.

I am willing to do whatever I need to do to get my knees back. I'm just not sure if that's even a reasonable expectation.
I had some knee problems a few years ago, had to walk with a cane couldnít ride at all. My ortho guy sent me to a physical the****** who helped it immensely. Donít wait around for medical help make an appointment go to your regular doc, he will refer you to ortho guy, who will probably have a course of action for you. Worse case scenario they replace them. I have a neighbor who is in her late 40ís she has had both knees replaced she can ride and walk without pain now. No real point in living with something like this when it most likely can be fixed.
I would forget the biking for now and try to get some help with your knees, the bikes will always be out there.
Baboo is online now  
Old 12-05-18, 06:12 PM
  #41  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 37,144

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 419 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5365 Post(s)
Liked 79 Times in 62 Posts
No, you should not have that kind of pain. You may need to strengthen some muscles around the knees. Or maybe some other exercises are in order. I agree that an orthopedist or physiatrist should be able to get you into the right physical therapy. Also, have you asked a bike expert to see if your fit on the bike is right?
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

ďWhen man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.Ē ó Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Old 12-06-18, 12:08 AM
  #42  
physdl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Puget Sound Area
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I definitely think you should be able to walk without pain. Whether you can bike 16 miles every day is a different question - my guess is that it would be a good goal but not a certain outcome, depending on how far you wanted to go with treatment and what the actual issue was. But, as everyone I think has said, go see a physical the******. I'd strongly recommend finding one who specializes in biking and/or knee pain. If that person can also fit bikes, even better. The PT I saw who did this was BikeFit certified and a USA cycling coach, so that might be something to look for in PTs.

And make sure you receive good care. If you don't like your current doctor, try a different one if you can. At the very least get a second opinion - that should be covered by all insurance plans. I'd also strongly recommend being picky about your doctor. One good (though not always perfect) way is to see who the local professional sports teams use for their injuries.
physdl is online now  
Old 12-06-18, 03:21 AM
  #43  
Johno59
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2016
Location: Cambridge UK
Posts: 325

Bikes: 2x pre-1934 Humbers, 1932 Raleigh Tourist, 1946 Raleigh Lenton, 1947 Grand Prix Raleigh, 1949 Golden Arrow, 1950 Robin Hood, 1956 Claude Butler, 1973 Raleigh Wayfarer, 1984 Holdsworth, 1985 EG Bates Lo-pro Funny TT Bike, 1980 Alan,3 x custom TT bikes

Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 118 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Copper and magnetic wrist bands solved my bad knees. I commute on my bikes 125 miles a week and work with a lot of ex machine, aircraft fitters and miners. They all wear magnetized copper bands to help with joint pain. You can even get copper inserts for your insole for a heavy dose. Nobody works without them. Apparently it is an old Roman Army cure to keep your sword arm fully functionable.
Johno59 is offline  
Old 12-13-18, 01:00 AM
  #44  
Teamprovicycle
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Providence
Posts: 723

Bikes: Specialized tarmac sl2 giant tcx zero

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 314 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
I agree. Much better for the environment as well.
are e bikes better for the environment ??
i dunno , they might be just as bad short term they do need power to run , it would be cool if you could charge your ebike with a indoor trainer generator , i seen a few on amazon , the idea looks good ?
Teamprovicycle is offline  
Old 12-13-18, 01:11 AM
  #45  
radroad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 312 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by NiGoCo View Post
As much as I enjoy it I don't think my knees can take it.

A couple weeks ago they started hurting a little. Mainly in the evening and waking up in the morning. The best way I can describe it is a raw feeling. Then the pain started while pedaling. Especially my right knee.

I decided to take last week off and double down on stretches. Finally had two days without knee pain and decided to try again this morning. After about two miles my right knee started telling me on every down stroke that it wasn't happy. It got to the point that I couldn't put any pressure whatsoever on it and I essentially did the last mile or so one legged. I hobbled around until about 2 O'Clock until the pain eased off. I took it very easy in the way home and did okay until I got home and off the bike. They were on fire. I've been melting ice packs on them for awhile now. Man are they hurting though.

My knees are what made me get off the bike seven or eight years ago. After years of abuse doing concrete work and working in crawl spaces under houses I had partially torn meniscus in both knees that I never had addressed. I've since been told by an orthopedic Dr that I have patellofemoral syndrome. I've had two Cortisone shots in my right knee and had enough relief that I could ride around the neighborhood with my wife and son. After that I thought I could handle the commute, especially after the first couple weeks were pain free. But now it's pretty clear that I'm not going to be able to do it with any regularity. Which is a major bummer because I thoroughly enjoy it. I'm not doing heavy construction work anymore but I still have a very physical job and can't take the chance of really damaging my knees.

I'll talk to my doctor again when I go for my annual check-up. Mainly just venting because I've really grown to enjoy getting around by bicycle.
​​​​​
Physical therapy can help you. Go to the best one in your area. Thank me later.
radroad is offline  
Old 12-13-18, 02:04 AM
  #46  
physdl
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: Puget Sound Area
Posts: 61
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Teamprovicycle View Post
are e bikes better for the environment ??
i dunno , they might be just as bad short term they do need power to run , it would be cool if you could charge your ebike with a indoor trainer generator , i seen a few on amazon , the idea looks good ?
Compared to non powered bikes, sure they're not as good for the environment. But compared to a car, they're substantially better for the environment. Taking a quick glance around at people who monitor their ebike power usage, they're over 10 times more efficient than a Tesla, which are rated around 120 mpge (and the numbers I saw didn't take into account pedaling). So basically ebikes can be rated at over a thousand mpge whereas a car would be at best 50 mpg.

If your electricity is in large part renewables, then the story is even better.
physdl is online now  
Old 12-13-18, 03:59 AM
  #47  
radroad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 312 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
In one of the last Bridgestone catalogs, Grant Petersen did a great job laying out the environment and electrical cost of producing a conventional bicycle. Stamping, welding, extruding, brazing, in short, every step along the way in the manufacturing process, not to mention the process of digging for iron ore, all take a huge toll on the environment.

The topsoil is destroyed, the ecosystem is destroyed, and of course huge amounts of petrol are required to dig for these ores. In order to acquire the petrol, even more damage to the environment is required. Every step along the way: producing a frame, pedals, tires, spokes, cables, etc., all have an environmental impact.

It doesn't end there. The more you ride, the more calories you burn. Say, 125 calories for every 5 miles. That's 250 calories for a 10 mile commute, or 750 calories for a 30 mile weekend ride. An e-bike ride halves those figures. Those extra calories have to be replaced. That means you eat more food. This requires transportation costs and petrol which involves environmental damage, paying for and feeding workers and/or more petrol for agricultural equipment, irrigation, pesticides etc etc etc etc etc etc.

To put it simply, there is an environmental cost to conventional bicycles as well, although it is largely invisible, and a tiny fraction compared to automobiles. Electric bicycles are a very green form of transportation, relatively speaking. So are conventional bicycles of course. But keep in mind the environmental toll is far from zero in either case.
radroad is offline  
Old 12-13-18, 04:03 AM
  #48  
radroad
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 396
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 312 Post(s)
Liked 14 Times in 12 Posts
I should also add that my knee pain has largely disappeared in the past year. I attribute it to two things:

1. a daily dose of bacon and eggs.

2. taking off the rack, bag, panniers and the accompanying ulock and cable and other little tidbits that transformed a (relatively) svelte flat bar road bike into a 40 lbs clunker.
radroad is offline  
Old 12-14-18, 02:01 PM
  #49  
Phamilton
Gone
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ft Wayne, IN
Posts: 1,026
Mentioned: 34 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 354 Post(s)
Liked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Originally Posted by NiGoCo View Post
So my yearly checkup is next month. That's when I'm going to bring this up to my doctor. But what I'm wondering is what would be a reasonable expectation?

​​​​​​Should I expect to be able to ride 8 miles twice a day without knee pain? Or is that just to much to ask for?

I haven't ridden since I posted this. My knees are still hurting even worse. Now my right knee has pain with normal walking.

I am willing to do whatever I need to do to get my knees back. I'm just not sure if that's even a reasonable expectation.
I was reading through your commuter build thread (awesome, BTW) and just wanted to drop you a note that we're similarly sized at 6'0" and 34" inseam. I run my saddles now at about 30 1/2" from center of crank to level top of saddle along the seat tube/seat post. If it moves more than about 1/4" up or down, I get a little pain after 20 miles or so. I run flat pedals and have to be mindful of the sole thickness of whatever shoes I'm wearing. Q/R seat post makes adjustments quick and easy. I have a little arthritis in addition to other issues, but I can say with certainty that having my saddle too high and too far forward was the source of a lot of unnecessary pain for me. It took me about a year to get it dialed in. It usually takes me about 3 weeks, 400-500 miles to get completely adjusted to fit changes, i.e. saddle height, bar height/angle, etc. Changing my saddle height even only 1/8" has me feeling like I'm pedaling in squares for a few days. My knee pain was the worst when my saddle height was 31 1/2" or so, or higher. I had a really hard time figuring out saddle height. For me, inseam x .883 was the best starting point and tweak slightly for best comfort from there.
I went straight into a 25 mile R/T bike commute from nearly zero riding. If I had it to do over, I'd have started on a hybrid or MTB like yours with a triple rather than road bikes with big handlebar drops and steep double gearing. I ride a hybrid with a triple now with drop bars added for comfort.
Not saying that I think your saddle height is wrong or your overall fit isn't right or anything, just wanted to share my experience. Hopefully things will improve for you soon. Knee pain is hard.
Phamilton is offline  
Old 12-15-18, 11:47 AM
  #50  
NiGoCo
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
NiGoCo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2018
Location: Central Texas
Posts: 100

Bikes: Couple junkers

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 46 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post
I was reading through your commuter build thread (awesome, BTW) and just wanted to drop you a note that we're similarly sized at 6'0" and 34" inseam. I run my saddles now at about 30 1/2" from center of crank to level top of saddle along the seat tube/seat post. If it moves more than about 1/4" up or down, I get a little pain after 20 miles or so. I run flat pedals and have to be mindful of the sole thickness of whatever shoes I'm wearing. Q/R seat post makes adjustments quick and easy. I have a little arthritis in addition to other issues, but I can say with certainty that having my saddle too high and too far forward was the source of a lot of unnecessary pain for me. It took me about a year to get it dialed in. It usually takes me about 3 weeks, 400-500 miles to get completely adjusted to fit changes, i.e. saddle height, bar height/angle, etc. Changing my saddle height even only 1/8" has me feeling like I'm pedaling in squares for a few days. My knee pain was the worst when my saddle height was 31 1/2" or so, or higher. I had a really hard time figuring out saddle height. For me, inseam x .883 was the best starting point and tweak slightly for best comfort from there.
I went straight into a 25 mile R/T bike commute from nearly zero riding. If I had it to do over, I'd have started on a hybrid or MTB like yours with a triple rather than road bikes with big handlebar drops and steep double gearing. I ride a hybrid with a triple now with drop bars added for comfort.
Not saying that I think your saddle height is wrong or your overall fit isn't right or anything, just wanted to share my experience. Hopefully things will improve for you soon. Knee pain is hard.
I got curious and broke out the tape measure. Interestingly from the center of the crank arm following up the seat tube to the top of the saddle I'm exactly at 30 1/2" as well. However I've got that big soft saddle that rises a little higher towards the back. It would be hard for me to measure by myself but I'd hazard a guess that with my weight on it it'll squish down to roughly the same height. I'm fairly certain based on all I've read and what my body is telling me that my fit is pretty close now.
NiGoCo is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.