Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Have you given up the car?

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Have you given up the car?

Reply

Old 11-27-18, 11:22 PM
  #76  
Slaninar
Bike Gremlin
 
Slaninar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Novi Sad
Posts: 4,024

Bikes: Custom made on Scott Speedster frame, Custom made on a 1996. steel MTB frame (all but frame changed at least once in the past 20 years).

Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 921 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Everything has a cost; a budget based on buying less and doing less because buying or doing almost anything beyond the subsistence level is allegedly "expensive", and unnecessary as well, sounds pretty much like the lifestyle advice touted by one or two of the devotees of asceticism who frequently provide their version of economic advice on the LCF sub-forum. Good for "saving money" though, assuming the ascetic or tightwad actually makes any real money, though what such people are saving it for remains a mystery.
From my experience, when my commute was 11 km one way, bike - using good quality components, not sparing anything, cost under 10 euros per month, while car, just the fuel costs, was about 50 per month.
Time saved on driving was mostly lost when trying to find an empty parking spot, while time saved on the way back was also mostly lost by being unable to make a quick grocery stop - parking again.

If the commute were about 5 km longer, then a car would have made a bit more sense. For 20+ km - a car would have been the only sensible option (apart from moving closer to work).

I can often use the company car - for free. Still, for all the hassle of traffic and parking, I prefer to use the bike - nothing to do with money saving, or being asketic.
Slaninar is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 02:54 AM
  #77  
Phamilton
Senior Member
 
Phamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ft Wayne, IN
Posts: 622
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 247 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Everything has a cost; a budget based on buying less and doing less because buying or doing almost anything beyond the subsistence level is allegedly "expensive", and unnecessary as well, sounds pretty much like the lifestyle advice touted by one or two of the devotees of asceticism who frequently provide their version of economic advice on the LCF sub-forum. Good for "saving money" though, assuming the ascetic or tightwad actually makes any real money, though what such people are saving it for remains a mystery.
Unexpected expenses and future financial goals are what most people are saving for. I don’t think you’re alone struggling with understanding frugality - my 12 year old has a hard time with it, too.

Edit: it's essentially about delayed vs instant gratification.

Last edited by Phamilton; 11-28-18 at 08:48 AM.
Phamilton is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 10:10 AM
  #78  
MMACH 5
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Posts: 3,755

Bikes: Dulcinea--2017 Kona Rove & a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
My wife and I have been a one-car family for most of our 30-year marriage. There were a few years that we lived 90 miles outside of town, so I had to have a car to get to work. For most of the 1990's, up until 2005, I was a skateboard commuter. I rode my skateboard to the bus stop, took the bus within a few miles of work and then skated into the office. In 2005, I got a job outside of the greater Dallas bus system. I dusted off an old bike from the garage and discovered a new passion. When I was struck by a car in 2012, being in a wheelchair, on crutches and a cane meant I needed a car for a bit. I'm a daily bike commuter. I mix in the bus and/or train with my bike more often than I used to, but being 26 miles away from home, I can get in about as many miles, each day as I want.

In the cold and rain, my coworkers often comment with things like, "Oh, you didn't believe the weather forecast, huh?" or "You picked the wrong day to ride that thing to work." Depending on how my day is going, my reply can be more snarky than it probably should be, but it is usually along the lines of "My boss doesn't care that it's raining and our clients still want their jobs to go out."
I usually drive the van to work two days out of the month. I bring fresh changes of office clothes on those days. My wife says my attitude is noticeably less pleasant on the days that I drive.
MMACH 5 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 10:15 AM
  #79  
acidfast7
EU > USA
 
acidfast7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: England / CPH
Posts: 7,930

Bikes: 2010 Cube Acid

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 769 Post(s)
When I was struck by a car in 2012, being in a wheelchair, on crutches and a cane meant I needed a car for a bit. I'm a daily bike commuter. I mix in the bus and/or train with my bike more often than I used to, but being 26 miles away from home, I can get in about as many miles, each day as I want.
That's solid.

I was hit by van recently and ran over (no wheelchair) and my girl wanted me to give the bike up with a kid on the way. The ER (A&E over here) doc convinced me to keep it, which was smart as I'm quite irritated when I don't cycle in.

I just saw a student with the same issue (taco'd rear wheel) and asked if he was OK.

It happens more than we'd like.
acidfast7 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 10:25 AM
  #80  
prj71
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2015
Posts: 1,411
Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 779 Post(s)
Rough and cold winters...20 to 50 below zero at times. Occasional crappy days with heavy rain, sleet or snow. Live out in the country with a longer commute to town for wor or any store for that matter.

Nope. My 2 cars aren't going anywhere now or ever.
prj71 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 10:30 AM
  #81  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post
Unexpected expenses and future financial goals are what most people are saving for. I don’t think you’re alone struggling with understanding frugality - my 12 year old has a hard time with it, too.

Edit: it's essentially about delayed vs instant gratification.
Bicycle commuting is about bicycle commuting.

IMO, "delayed gratification" is not a major consideration for most people in the U.S. who choose to ride a bicycle to work or anywhere else for that matter.

So called "Frugality" may be the reason why a relative handful of people choose to ride a bicycle to/from work rather than use other available alternatives. "Frugality/delayed gratification" are hardly the best words to describe the motivation for those who use a bicycle for transportation because they unfortunately do not have the wherewithal to make any other choice.

In dense urban areas where bicycling to work can save the commuter the most money per trip by avoiding high parking fees, IMO more than likely the bike commuter is choosing the bicycle as an alternative to public transit, rather than as the means to "give up the car."

Last edited by I-Like-To-Bike; 11-28-18 at 10:33 AM.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 10:58 AM
  #82  
Steely Dan
born again cyclist
 
Steely Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,331

Bikes: I have five of brikes

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
In dense urban areas where bicycling to work can save the commuter the most money per trip by avoiding high parking fees, IMO more than likely the bike commuter is choosing the bicycle as an alternative to public transit, rather than as the means to "give up the car."
living in urban chicago, it's kinda both for us.

my bike commuting helps us remain a one-car family. even though she works from home most days, i like to leave the car for my wife in case she needs/wants to use it, after all, it's "her car" . also, driving in chicago rush-hour traffic drives me absolutely effing crazy. i'd rather endure a drug-free root canal.

but i can (and occasionally do) take the train to work. round-trip on the train costs $8.50/day (or $123 for a monthly pass, or nearly $1,500/year).

since i only ride the train on the worst weather days (maybe 20x/year on average or $170 worth), bike commuting keeps ~$1,300/year in my wallet that i would have otherwise spent on train passes (getting a 2nd car is not in the cards for us because our condo only has one off-street parking space and street parking in our neighborhood can be annoying at times).

Last edited by Steely Dan; 11-28-18 at 11:04 AM.
Steely Dan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 11:20 AM
  #83  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,234
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 508 Post(s)
,
Originally Posted by MMACH 5 View Post
My wife and I have been a one-car family for most of our 30-year marriage. There were a few years that we lived 90 miles outside of town, so I had to have a car to get to work. For most of the 1990's, up until 2005, I was a skateboard commuter. I rode my skateboard to the bus stop, took the bus within a few miles of work and then skated into the office.

In 2005, I got a job outside of the greater Dallas bus system. I dusted off an old bike from the garage and discovered a new passion. When I was struck by a car in 2012, being in a wheelchair, on crutches and a cane meant I needed a car for a bit. I'm a daily bike commuter. I mix in the bus and/or train with my bike more often than I used to, but being 26 miles away from home, I can get in about as many miles, each day as I want.

In the cold and rain, my coworkers often comment with things like, "Oh, you didn't believe the weather forecast, huh?" or "You picked the wrong day to ride that thing to work." Depending on how my day is going, my reply can be more snarky than it probably should be, but it is usually along the lines of "My boss doesn't care that it's raining and our clients still want their jobs to go out."

I usually drive the van to work two days out of the month. I bring fresh changes of office clothes on those days. My wife says my attitude is noticeably less pleasant on the days that I drive.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Have you given up the car?

...it seems that this thread is becoming the de facto “Living Car Light” Forum (in disctinction to the de jure “Living Car Free” Forum). .
Your post resonated with me.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
] have lived a cycling lifestyle for about 40 years, and in 2012 I was hit from behind and spent two weeks in an acute care hospital, six weeks in a rehab hospital, three months off work, and five months until I could ride again
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
How's this for multi-modal commute?!

For myself, it’s rare I can leave for home before 7 PM for my 14 mile, off-peak reverse commute, and by that time, traffic is pretty light. Except for about a one mile dark stretch, I feel pretty safe, but peering frequently in my rearview mirror.

More often though, I take the Commuter Rail home.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
My cycling reputation, mundane as my cycling might be to the hard-core cyclists, is always a source of amusement and conversation with my friends and acquaintances; e.g. in bad weather, “You didn’t ride your bike today, did you?,” or at fancy social events, “Did you ride your bike here?.” Always asked with amusement and respect.....
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
BTW, my wife is a nurse, and she tended me well during my three month convalescence from my cycling accident. Our relationship was early on very bicycle-centered, including a cross-country cycling honeymoon, so she does not give me a hard time about continuing cycling.

I kid her that's because we have one family car, and it's hers (and our son's) since I cycle commute and do errands. When I do ride in nasty weather though she does chide me, "You just want to ride today so you can write about it on BikeForums."
BTW, I like your avatar. When I was growing up, we had a Mobile gas station nearby, with that old Mobile Icon:

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 11-28-18 at 10:35 PM.
Jim from Boston is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 11:30 AM
  #84  
acidfast7
EU > USA
 
acidfast7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: England / CPH
Posts: 7,930

Bikes: 2010 Cube Acid

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 769 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post

but i can (and occasionally do) take the train to work. round-trip on the train costs $8.50/day (or $123 for a monthly pass, or nearly $1,500/year).
Damn, that yearly pass is quite cheap! Some of the London variants are more than £4K for a year! Is that all of CHI?

Prices: http://content.tfl.gov.uk/adult-fares-2018.pdf

"Pay as you go" is the one far. "Travel card" is daily.

The average London salary is £40K pre-tax, £30K post-tax and about £117 for every working day ... ouch for the median man.

Last edited by acidfast7; 11-28-18 at 11:36 AM.
acidfast7 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 11:34 AM
  #85  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
What is the difference between a "car-light" person and a motor vehicle owner who sometimes rides a bicycle, takes a bus or perhaps walks somewhere for transportation?
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 11:41 AM
  #86  
Steely Dan
born again cyclist
 
Steely Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,331

Bikes: I have five of brikes

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
Damn, that yearly pass is quite cheap! Some of the London variants are more than £4K for a year! Is that all of CHI?
no, metra commuter rail monthly pass prices vary by how far one travels.

the cheapest is $116/month ($1,392/year), the most expensive is $276/month ($3,312/year).

i live in the city proper and work in an inner ring suburb, so i don't have very far to go which is why i am on the cheaper end of the spectrum.

CTA el trains (rapid transit within the city and a few inner ring suburbs only) have a monthly unlimited pass for $105 ($1,260/year) regardless of distance traveled (also good for all CTA buses too). it's a great value. i can take the el to work as well, but it involves a bit of back-tracking and a line transfer, and thus takes a bit longer than my commuter rail option, which is more of a straight-shot.


Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
What is the difference between a "car-light" person and a motor vehicle owner who sometimes rides a bicycle, takes a bus or perhaps walks somewhere for transportation?
i'm not sure there would be much of a difference, but if you really wanna split those hairs, maybe what separates the "car-light" person is that non-car transportation (walking, cycling, transit) is their default mode, while car use is the outlier, whereas the inverse might be the case for your second person?

just thinking out loud here.

Last edited by Steely Dan; 11-28-18 at 12:06 PM.
Steely Dan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 12:03 PM
  #87  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
i'm not sure there would be much of a difference, but if you wanna split those hairs, maybe what separates the "car-light" person is that non-car transportation (walking, cycling, transit) is their default mode, while car use is the outlier, whereas the inverse might be the case for your second person?

just thinking out loud here.
Your suggestion of default mode is one possibility, but there is nothing in the definition of a bicycle commuter that mandates or even implies it is the individual's default mode of transportation expect perhaps for getting to and from the place of employment.

IMO, the "car-light" moniker is used by BF posters who wish to earn or award a PC merit badge to bicycle riders who have no intention of "giving up the car".

Just as the "Car-free" award badge is sometimes self-awarded by BF bicycle riders who have given up the car and claim to be car free while the SO does all the motorized transportation chores with the household owned motor vehicle.

Last edited by I-Like-To-Bike; 11-28-18 at 12:09 PM.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 12:13 PM
  #88  
Steely Dan
born again cyclist
 
Steely Dan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,331

Bikes: I have five of brikes

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 158 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Your suggestion of default mode is one possibility, but there is nothing in the definition of a bicycle commuter that mandates or even implies it is the individual's default mode of transportation expect perhaps for getting to and from the place of employment.
right, a bicycle commuter is anyone who regularly rides a bicycle (in whole or in part) to get to a regular place of obligation away from their dwelling (work, school, whatever). nothing more, nothing less.

speaking for myself as a self-identifying "car-light" person, car-light goes beyond just commuting, it applies to any time i leave my home for any reason (work, run errands, going out for dinner/entertainment, taking the kids to the playground, etc.). whenever i leave my home i am FAR more likely to do so on foot or bicycle (or on foot to get to transit), than i am via car. it's one of the biggest reasons why we choose to live where we do (and pay a bit of premium to do so).

Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
IMO, the "car-light" moniker is used by BF posters who wish to earn or award a PC merit badge to bicycle riders who have no intention of "giving up the car".
wait, we can earn merit badges here?

how do i sign up?

Steely Dan is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 12:28 PM
  #89  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
wait, we can earn merit badges here?

how do i sign up?

Subscribe to the LCF sub-forum. The high priests/scout masters of Car-free/Car-light high horsemanship are always looking for comrades and bloodless pinning of morality awards to themselves.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 12:37 PM
  #90  
MMACH 5
Cycle Dallas
 
MMACH 5's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Land of Gar, TX
Posts: 3,755

Bikes: Dulcinea--2017 Kona Rove & a few others

Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 179 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
,Your post resonated with me. BTW, I like your avatar. When I was growing up, we had a Mobile gas station nearby, with that old Mobile Icon:
Almost creepy how similar we are. (In a good way.)
My grandfather blew neon for a living in Wichita Falls, so he made countless neon Mobil horses for gas stations all over west Texas. And while it is mostly obscured by taller buildings, the large one still sits atop the former Magnolia/Mobil Oil building in downtown Dallas. Back in the '80s, Dallas put out a bike route system and the signs featured the Mobil Pegasus with bicycle wheels. I was going to get a tattoo of that Pegasus and my daughter kind of called me on it. She said, "Dad, you're a graphic artist. Certainly, you can come up with your own bicycle Pegasus design."

That's the story of my avatar. Thank you for noticing it.
Thread jack over.
MMACH 5 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 12:37 PM
  #91  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 36,067

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 378 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4792 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Subscribe to the LCF sub-forum. The high priests/scout masters of Car-free/Car-light high horsemanship are always looking for comrades and bloodless pinning of morality awards to themselves.
And your role is to make fun of them.
__________________
Tom Reingold, [email protected]
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 12:40 PM
  #92  
Jim from Boston
Senior Member
 
Jim from Boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,234
Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 508 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
no, metra commuter rail monthly pass prices vary by how far one travels.

the cheapest is $116/month ($1,392/year), the most expensive is $276/month ($3,312/year).

i live in the city proper and work in an inner ring suburb, so i don't have very far to go which is why i am on the cheaper end of the spectrum.

CTA el trains (rapid transit within the city and a few inner ring suburbs only) have a monthly unlimited pass for $105 ($1,260/year) regardless of distance traveled (also good for all CTA buses too).

it's a great value. i can take the el to work as well, but it involves a bit of back-tracking and a line transfer, and thus takes a bit longer than my commuter rail option, which is more of a straight-shot.
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
...but i can (and occasionally do) take the train to work. round-trip on the train costs $8.50/day (or $123 for a monthly pass, or nearly $1,500/year).

since i only ride the train on the worst weather days (maybe 20x/year on average or $170 worth), bike commuting keeps ~$1,300/year in my wallet that i would have otherwise spent on train passes (getting a 2nd car is not in the cards for us because our condo only has one off-street parking space and street parking in our neighborhood can be annoying at times).
The Commuter Raii fare schedule in Metro Boston is based on Zones 2 – 8. Fully assembled bikes are free during off-peak hours.

For about 20 rides in one month, the tickets range from $130.00 (Zone 2: Monthly pass 207.75) to $230.00 (Zone 8; monthly pass $353.00) My zone is #3 ($150 / $234.25), but I use it maybe x3/week (14 miles from home).

We live Kenmore Square in downtown Boston, site of Fenway Park, and a commercial business / residential multi-unit neighborhood, with two-hour parking meters @ $2.50 / two hours from 8AM to 6PM, except Sunday. Some metered spots, and a few free parking spots are limited to cars with residential parking stickers.

We own a deeded outdoor parking space, and will tow trespassers. A nice perk is that on Snow Emergencies we can park at a reduced rate in nearby commercial parking structures and not get snowed in, and then we have have a shoveling service, so parking is again available after the Emergency.


Last edited by Jim from Boston; 11-28-18 at 01:19 PM. Reason: added first Steely Dan quote
Jim from Boston is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 01:00 PM
  #93  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,177

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Did any of the deleted stuff explain how MMM came up with a 50¢/mile "marginal" cost;
No, I'm not sure where noglider found that figure, it was probably from this different post The True Cost of Commuting

or what investment he recommends that his listeners make with this unspent money that will guarantee the future 5% annual return for the 13 year period that the money must remain unspent for MMM's financial model to work?
MMM recommends investing in low-fee index funds to just track the market (although he also has a little bit of stuff dabbling with peer-to-peer lending (Lending Club)). The rest of the equation is (a) consume (spend) radically less, (b) save radically more. If you are skilled in frugality, you don't need as large of a pile of money to 'retire', and accelerated saving gets you to that pile quicker. Also, 'retirement' doesn't preclude doing productive, valuable things and receiving money for it. More it means you have a lot more control over choosing productive things to do that you find fulfilling and enjoyable, and doing only as much of it as you want.
RubeRad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 01:08 PM
  #94  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,177

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
What is the difference between a "car-light" person and a motor vehicle owner who sometimes rides a bicycle, takes a bus or perhaps walks somewhere for transportation?
The line between 'car-light' and 'car-full' is surely fuzzy, but I would think that a consensus 'car-light' might include criteria like: driving a car significantly less than the average amount (i.e. 5000mi/year? 1000/mi/year vs typical 15000mi/year?), having long stretches of time where the car is not driven at all (whole weeks? months?), and having frequent days of no-use (typically car is not touched 3 days/wk? 5days/wk? 200 days/yr?)

As I mentioned, our minivan is used like a regular american minivan, it takes multiple trips most days, for about 15000mi/yr. "my" car is driven typically 0-5 trips/week and when I can I take it to work and leave it in the parking deck (out of the SoCal sun) for weeks, sometimes months, at a time.

So the minivan is 'car-full' and the car is 'car-lite'. I consider us a 1.5-car family.
RubeRad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 01:53 PM
  #95  
Phamilton
Senior Member
 
Phamilton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Ft Wayne, IN
Posts: 622
Mentioned: 15 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 247 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
Bicycle commuting is about bicycle commuting.

IMO, "delayed gratification" is not a major consideration for most people in the U.S. who choose to ride a bicycle to work or anywhere else for that matter.

So called "Frugality" may be the reason why a relative handful of people choose to ride a bicycle to/from work rather than use other available alternatives. "Frugality/delayed gratification" are hardly the best words to describe the motivation for those who use a bicycle for transportation because they unfortunately do not have the wherewithal to make any other choice.

In dense urban areas where bicycling to work can save the commuter the most money per trip by avoiding high parking fees, IMO more than likely the bike commuter is choosing the bicycle as an alternative to public transit, rather than as the means to "give up the car."

The question of yours that I answered ("Good for "saving money" though, assuming the ascetic or tightwad actually makes any real money, though what such people are saving it for remains a mystery.") had nothing to do with bike commuting. You have taken my quote out of context and manipulated my words. I no longer understand what you're seeking, but you may find like-minded individuals on LCF board.
Phamilton is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 01:57 PM
  #96  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
So the minivan is 'car-full' and the car is 'car-lite'. I consider us a 1.5-car family.
That's a new one one! A motor vehicle that is car-lite.

Previously I have only seen the "car-lite" merit badge applied to people not vehicles.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 02:03 PM
  #97  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
And your role is to make fun of them.
Some of them can be hilarious all by their selves without any prompting, especially if gratuitous wackiness is considered funny.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 02:04 PM
  #98  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,177

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike View Post
That's a new one one! A motor vehicle that is car-lite.

Previously I have only seen the "car-lite" merit badge applied to people not vehicles.
OK, in that case you could say that I'm car-lite and my wife is car-full. Not to impugn her at all, she has different responsibilities that require moving more people further distances more often.
RubeRad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 02:31 PM
  #99  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
OK, in that case you could say that I'm car-lite and my wife is car-full. Not to impugn her at all, she has different responsibilities that require moving more people further distances more often.
I would say that you both share the benefits and convenience of owning the vehicles; it is immaterial as to who drives it to bring home the bacon, literally or figuratively, to keep the household functioning. IMO, you are both car-lite if you prefer that term.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-18, 02:34 PM
  #100  
I-Like-To-Bike
Been Around Awhile
 
I-Like-To-Bike's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Burlington Iowa
Posts: 27,281

Bikes: Vaterland and Ragazzi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post
The question of yours that I answered ("Good for "saving money" though, assuming the ascetic or tightwad actually makes any real money, though what such people are saving it for remains a mystery.") had nothing to do with bike commuting. You have taken my quote out of context and manipulated my words. I no longer understand what you're seeking, but you may find like-minded individuals on LCF board.
My question about what the money is being saved for was specifically directed at the one or two devotees of LCF as an adjunct of their belief in asceticism who frequently provide their version of economic advice on the LCF sub-forum. I did not quote your posts when I asked that rhetorical "question."

FYI, I have no trouble, like a 12 year old child understanding the meaning of frugality .

"Frugality/Delayed gratification" as a rationale for bicycle commuting is your construct; and I believe my response to that was clear and to the point.
I-Like-To-Bike is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service