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Need new wheels for a 35 mile round trip commute.

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Need new wheels for a 35 mile round trip commute.

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Old 12-01-18, 09:47 AM
  #26  
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@acidfast7 , you have a 1/8" chain, right? They last a very long time, sometimes over 40 years.
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Old 12-01-18, 10:23 AM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
We'll to be honest, Denver is quite sprawling endless suburbia and it's much easier to rack up miles. Also, the traffic density is much lower than over here.
More miles equals more vehicle exposure. Lower traffic density also means higher traffic speeds. Both combined would suggest a higher risk for me here in Denver.

But that is not the point. The thread is about durability of wheels in normal use, not about their ability to survive a crash with a car. No bicycle wheel, no matter what the material used for construction, can be built to survive an encounter a car crash.

A bicycle wheel can, however, be built to better withstand day to day use. Whether or not that is economical is up to the rider.
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Old 12-01-18, 10:31 AM
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Originally Posted by rseeker View Post
What causes this to be true?
Better construction, better bearings and better seals. The cup and cone system is inherently prone to problems. You have to adjust the bearing so that it is just right. Often you aren’t. A little loose and the bearing can will fret the cone. A little too tight and the bearings gaul and pit the cone. A bit of sand in the bearings and the cones are ground up. If you don’t get the lock nut tight enough, the whole system gets loose and we are back to fretting.

Cartridge bearings are pressed into place and that it. They are machined so that they don’t need adjustment. There’s less to go wrong and so less to wear because of operator error.
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Old 12-01-18, 11:08 AM
  #29  
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I seem to be having issues with cones in my cheaper wheelsets. So, if you're really pounding out the miles, something like Ultegra may well be a good choice. Or, as mentioned, some even more boutique hubs.

I'm not sure about tires. I've commuted on tubulars (sewups), clinchers, and now experimenting with tubeless.

I suffered my first catastrophic tubeless failure last weekend. I did get myself back on the road eventually, but lost a lot more time than if I had simply gotten a flat with a tube tire.

I started this thread a few days ago:
Durable 25mm Tubeless? "Training Tire"?

A couple of people have suggested Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR as a tire for puncture resistance, and reasonably low rolling resistance.
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Old 12-01-18, 11:16 AM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
More miles equals more vehicle exposure. Lower traffic density also means higher traffic speeds. Both combined would suggest a higher risk for me here in Denver.
All true, but more time on the road also means more experience. So, I think longer distance cyclists are in fact safer per mile than those riding less. That is, if they don't start taking too many risks. Plus, of course, also health benefits.

I do feel more comfortable once I escape to the country roads, even if speeds are higher.

I have, however, had a couple of drivers that made me really nervous lately.
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Old 12-02-18, 03:08 AM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
A couple of people have suggested Pirelli Cinturato Velo TLR as a tire for puncture resistance, and reasonably low rolling resistance.
The early reviews on these are great but no one has had them for years yet... I wonder about their tread life even if all the other promises are true.
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Old 12-02-18, 04:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post

The early reviews on these are great but no one has had them for years yet... I wonder about their tread life even if all the other promises are true.
True,

That is one of the problems with a lot of reviews. They often are based on looking pretty in the box (or pictures of the box). There have been tests of various insults, and the tires so far are testing well. But, really, it takes getting out on the pavement, and burning through a half dozen tires, and keeping close records to really know how well they perform. Comparison between those and another tire like the Schwalbe Pro One tires.

If only I had a pro team that I was paying a few dozen riders to go out and pound pavement for 8 hours a day.

Nonetheless, if I was just starting with tubeless with the idea of improving reliability, those would be on the top of my list.

Reviews on the Panaracer Race A specifically mentioned ease of mounting, which may well also play a factor in one's choice.
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Old 12-02-18, 10:24 AM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by Hatsuwr View Post
Hubs: Shimano Ultegra HB-6800/FH-6800
Rims: Mavic Open Pro UST

Spokes: DT Swiss Competition 2.0/1.8
Nipples: DT Swiss Black Brass 12 mm
Mavic Open Pro UST Tubeless Rims Shimano 6800 Hubs 32h Wheelset [741494] - $339.00 Velomine.com : Worldwide Bicycle Shop, fixed gear track bike wheelsets campagnolo super record vintage bike
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Old 12-02-18, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post


More miles equals more vehicle exposure. Lower traffic density also means higher traffic speeds. Both combined would suggest a higher risk for me here in Denver.

But that is not the point. The thread is about durability of wheels in normal use, not about their ability to survive a crash with a car. No bicycle wheel, no matter what the material used for construction, can be built to survive an encounter a car crash.

A bicycle wheel can, however, be built to better withstand day to day use. Whether or not that is economical is up to the rider.
You know, sometimes you make a lot of sense, like a scientist, sometimes, like this time, it makes no sense.

Also, one of the largest differences if that bicycles live permanently outside exposed to the elements (and people) all the time, like the should.

For us, that is considered normal use and the lifespan is significantly shorter.

But back to you lower traffic density-style argument, I think you need to sort out your thoughts better.
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Old 12-02-18, 06:34 PM
  #35  
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Old 12-02-18, 06:49 PM
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I've been riding a set of Shimano WH-RS10 wheels for a while (more or less equivalent to the Shimano 105/5700). I think the spokes are 24/20. So far the front has done well. I've had some issues with nipple angles on the rear, and spoke stress at the junction, but that may be something that I did. I still have to look at that.

My latest is a WH-6800 on the front. The new cone adjustment is just wild. But, so far the wheel is doing well. I like the new tapeless design, especially if one is going tubeless.

I've got a WH-6700 ready to go for the rear, but probably won't start riding it until early Spring. More traditional cones, also tapeless (no through spoke holes).

I will say that truing the WH-6700/6800 wheels is a bit odd, but I'm hoping that once done, they should be stable.

My tubeless mount (Schwalbe Pro One) on the WH-6800 front went well when running tubeless (my first tubeless setup), and it held air well. Trying to get a tube into the Schwalbe Pro One on that wheel, however, was a major hassle.

Anyway, consider WH-6800 wheels for ordinary use.
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Old 12-02-18, 06:53 PM
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17.5 miles each way ? you're into E Bike (spare battery pack)

makes more sense, by now, territory,

It's adding a part time job just getting there and back..
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Old 12-02-18, 07:44 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
17.5 miles each way ? you're into E Bike (spare battery pack)

makes more sense, by now, territory,

It's adding a part time job just getting there and back..
I disagree.

While an E-Bike is an option, that is at about the limit that one can do in about an hour on a road bike, pushing it pretty hard. Or an hour and a half at a little less than a breakneck speed/effort. Still, not a distance that should be taken lightly for a beginner, but one can get used to it.

Of course, one has to deal with sweat, fatigue, and the elements, depending on what is needed at the job. Flat tires and roadside problems? Bicycle security?

I've got a Tricross. It makes a great utility bike. However, for the longer distances and higher speeds, I much prefer using a full road bike. But, then one has to deal with cargo.

I.E. If one can get cargo, tools, etc, down to say 10 pounds into a backpack, one could do well.

Evaluate what you're carrying back and forth, and whether it is possible to leave some things like office shoes or your Kryptonite lock at the destination.

Hopefully I will get to a frame bag project for my Colnago this winter, and thus increase cargo capacity on the bike. But, I'm all for light and efficient. Oh, and I still like 25mm tires. I haven't tried 28's, but 32's and larger tires just don't do it for me, unless I'm going for a heavy cargo run.
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Old 12-02-18, 08:34 PM
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This took off! Thanks for the discussions and suggestions everyone. So I'm still looking around the $600 price range, and leaning a bit more toward the Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST's right now.
Although as Dedhed pointed out, the Open Pro UST's + 6800 hubs could be had for $340+140 for tires - so roughly the same price.

Sorry for no links, but I don't have the required post count.

Thoughts between the two?


As far as the E-Bike goes - I can do the route in about an hour each way on my current (bad) setup. I'm in the military and work in a place where locking up isn't necessary, and my uniform could be left at work. All I would carry is food, water, and music - probably in a frame bag.. All said, considering overheads, it's about 1.5 hours more per day to ride than to drive. PT is a fact of life, so this would offset maybe a half hour per day of that. They're also working on a bike bridge that will cut about 3-4 miles off the route each way. No saying when that will be done though.

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Old 12-03-18, 01:44 AM
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Originally Posted by Hatsuwr View Post
This took off! Thanks for the discussions and suggestions everyone. So I'm still looking around the $600 price range, and leaning a bit more toward the Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST's right now.
Although as Dedhed pointed out, the Open Pro UST's + 6800 hubs could be had for $340+140 for tires - so roughly the same price.

Sorry for no links, but I don't have the required post count.

Thoughts between the two?


As far as the E-Bike goes - I can do the route in about an hour each way on my current (bad) setup. I'm in the military and work in a place where locking up isn't necessary, and my uniform could be left at work. All I would carry is food, water, and music - probably in a frame bag.. All said, considering overheads, it's about 1.5 hours more per day to ride than to drive. PT is a fact of life, so this would offset maybe a half hour per day of that. They're also working on a bike bridge that will cut about 3-4 miles off the route each way. No saying when that will be done though.
Where are you commuting from/to? Just curious about the yearly weather.
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Old 12-03-18, 02:12 AM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
Where are you commuting from/to? Just curious about the yearly weather.
I'm in the US between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington DC. Spring is wet but temperate, summer is pretty warm and humid, fall gets cold quick and we usually have several inches of snow in winter. I probably won't bike when ice is a concern since that's only a few days each year and not worth the extra hardware to me. Will be out in the rain quite a bit though, and they salt the roads, so corrosion is a concern.
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Old 12-03-18, 03:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Hatsuwr View Post
I'm in the US between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington DC. Spring is wet but temperate, summer is pretty warm and humid, fall gets cold quick and we usually have several inches of snow in winter. I probably won't bike when ice is a concern since that's only a few days each year and not worth the extra hardware to me. Will be out in the rain quite a bit though, and they salt the roads, so corrosion is a concern.
Also, what about bike storage: inside at work/home?
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Old 12-03-18, 04:02 AM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
Also, what about bike storage: inside at work/home?
Yup! Garage at home and sheltered bike rack at work.

*edit*

So my current list is narrowed down to this, in order of price:

1. Edco Roches
2. Hunt Race Aero Superdura
3. Mavic Ksyrium Elite UST
4. Mavic Open Pro UST 6800 hubs
5. Pro-Lite Bortola A21W

I'm leaning pretty heavily toward the Ksyrium's, but want to do a bit more reading first.

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Old 12-03-18, 10:49 AM
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One thing about many Mavic wheels is that they are extremely proprietary. So, if you do manage to break a spoke, then the only replacement is Mavic. I haven't used them, so perhaps they don't break that many spokes, but it is something to keep in mind.

Several of the high end wheels are going that way. Straight pull spokes are becoming more common. Shimano has odd nipples on some of their wheels.
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Old 12-03-18, 11:47 PM
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Originally Posted by CliffordK View Post
One thing about many Mavic wheels is that they are extremely proprietary. So, if you do manage to break a spoke, then the only replacement is Mavic. I haven't used them, so perhaps they don't break that many spokes, but it is something to keep in mind.

Several of the high end wheels are going that way. Straight pull spokes are becoming more common. Shimano has odd nipples on some of their wheels.
Good point. I'm really not a fan of than trend, especially when it's motivated by profit rather than performance. Thankfully, besides my front tire's recent meeting with a SUV, I've been lucky enough to never so much as break a spoke. Even here, the spokes are fine but the rim is bent in four different directions. Hopefully that trend, besides the SUV part, continues!
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Old 12-04-18, 12:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Hatsuwr View Post
Thankfully, besides my front tire's recent meeting with a SUV, I've been lucky enough to never so much as break a spoke. Even here, the spokes are fine but the rim is bent in four different directions. Hopefully that trend, besides the SUV part, continues!
This support my hypothesis that well-built equipment never really wears out it. Rather it gets damaged and/or stolen to complete it's lifespan. Especially over here, where distances are shorter and bikes live outside for most of their lives.
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Old 12-04-18, 09:47 AM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post
This support my hypothesis that well-built equipment never really wears out it. Rather it gets damaged and/or stolen to complete it's lifespan. Especially over here, where distances are shorter and bikes live outside for most of their lives.
Sounds about right haha.
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Old 12-04-18, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Hatsuwr View Post
Sounds about right haha.
Nice one, my man, nice one.
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Old 12-04-18, 05:49 PM
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I have over 20K trouble free miles of urban commuting on my 36h open pros on 6700 hubs on crappy midwestern roads
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Old 12-04-18, 06:07 PM
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Originally Posted by acidfast7 View Post

But back to you lower traffic density-style argument, I think you need to sort out your thoughts better.
It makes a lot of sense to me. I start my commute in sprawling suburbia and end in a dense urban center. I'm a lot more comfortable in the city than i am on the higher speed roads closer to my house. The suburban throughways are easier to handle during rush hour when speeds are lower.
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