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Any crazy thoughts for how to cross a river on my commute?

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Any crazy thoughts for how to cross a river on my commute?

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Old 01-21-19, 02:14 PM
  #76  
alan s 
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Originally Posted by Daniel4 View Post
Don't tell them your Mexican or they'll build something else.
I think the OP is looking for something more specific than just crazy thoughts.
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Old 01-22-19, 01:22 PM
  #77  
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Wow, this thread surely delivers, plenty of crazy thoughts in here. An Alpacka packraft is a great idea but probably fails at the 15-minute requirement. You'd have to pump up the boat, disassemble the bike, then reverse on the other shore.

Who owns the land and how remote/frequently-traveled is this location? If you were ambitious enough, I'd say build a very cheap, crude raft with a rope and hope nobody takes it. Or you could stash a couple of tubes in the woods - one for yourself, one for your bike. A cheaper alternative to Alpacka.
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Old 01-22-19, 02:26 PM
  #78  
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Tubes is a good idea, leave two there for starters, if they get stolen, get another pair and chain them up. If they get slashed, then tubes is not a good idea.
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Old 01-22-19, 03:23 PM
  #79  
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If itís a truck tube itíll have a Schrader valve and you can inflate it with CO2 cartridges. It might take a few.
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Old 01-22-19, 03:26 PM
  #80  
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What about an inflatable dinghy? It weighs about 2 pounds and packs to 4 by 9 inches. If you don't want to carry a bike on it, use 2 bikes (beaters maybe?), one on each side of the river.

https://www.amazon.com/Klymit-Light-.../dp/B073HKKSQ4
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Old 01-25-19, 01:38 PM
  #81  
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Originally Posted by roughrider504 View Post
Rivendell doesn't sell a hand crafted dinghy with an extra long tail section? Odd. I bet it would be under $10K too!
Oddly enough, Velo Orange was founded by the same entrepreneur who founded Chesapeake Light Craft (Chesapeake Light Craft | Boat Plans, Boat Kits, Boatbuilding Supplies, Boat Kit, Kayak Kit, Canoe Kit, Sailboat Kit). Beautiful designs, and their kits can be built to heirloom quality.

Personally, for the warm months of the year, I'd be looking at a Pirogue made from 2 sheets of marine plywood and $500 worth of epoxy and fittings, or a $100 aluminum canoe from Craigslist.
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Old 01-25-19, 04:49 PM
  #82  
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Originally Posted by SloButWide View Post
Personally, for the warm months of the year, I'd be looking at a Pirogue made from 2 sheets of marine plywood and $500 worth of epoxy and fittings, or a $100 aluminum canoe from Craigslist.
Aluminum canoes are fun, maneuverable (if the current isn't too bad), and efficient. It's a good idea, and if you could secure your bike upright in the middle or front, you would be good to go. Only issue might be getting in and out without getting your feet wet, depending on the shoreline.
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Old 01-25-19, 05:20 PM
  #83  
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After reading all of these ideas I'd like to hear the outcome. Please let us know what you end up doing.
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Old 01-27-19, 09:17 AM
  #84  
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Speaking of bridges...

This click through slide show I found has some AMAZING bridges.



-Kedosto
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Old 01-27-19, 11:34 AM
  #85  
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I have a 17 ft aluminum canoe from when it was still being made by an airplane company. Surely itís worth more than $100 even just as scrap aluminum?

I see a brand new version of the same thing from the heritage manufacturer is $1700. Ah well, 100 is probably it.
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Old 01-27-19, 12:39 PM
  #86  
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
I have a 17 ft aluminum canoe from when it was still being made by an airplane company. Surely itís worth more than $100 even just as scrap aluminum?

I see a brand new version of the same thing from the heritage manufacturer is $1700. Ah well, 100 is probably it.
Steel would give a more compliant ride.
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Old 01-27-19, 12:49 PM
  #87  
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Funny, a new guy at work was asking the same question about the Columbia River last week. A bit bigger, but the same problem. I say heavy lifting drone, so it can go home and recharge safely while you work. They don't exist yet, at least not affordable ones, but that would be great.
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Old 01-27-19, 12:51 PM
  #88  
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Originally Posted by Stadjer View Post
World record is about 70 feet, so with a back on his bike he should easily make 60 feet, after a little practice.
Bike powered pole vault!
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Old 01-27-19, 09:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Kedosto View Post
Fantastic!
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Old 01-28-19, 10:45 AM
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Very cool -- that first bridge, the Chinese 'lucky knot' -- how is a bike supposed to get across that (without shouldering up and down stairs)?
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Old 01-28-19, 10:51 AM
  #91  
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Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
Very cool -- that first bridge, the Chinese 'lucky knot' -- how is a bike supposed to get across that (without shouldering up and down stairs)?
When I first saw that bridge, my thoughts went to a couple MTB dudes I know....
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Old 01-30-19, 12:21 AM
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I often wear wetsuit boots for cycling in the rain (with platform pedals). Once or twice a year, sections of our road will flood so I'll have to wade through water that can be up over my knees on my commute to work. To wade through the water I wear shorts with the wetsuit boots and shoulder my bike (panniers included). I hop back on and continue riding once I'm past the water. The boots fill with water, but my feet are warm and comfortable - no need to change to keep riding.
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Old 01-30-19, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Hatsuwr View Post
This little river is the only thing keeping my entire commute from being on bike paths and trails. Going around adds several miles to the trip, and adds even more than that distance as busy roads:
I'd probably go up the road a piece and make your crossing at the powerline cut. There doesn't seem to be a proper trail but it's open ground all the way down to the river bank. One of the trails you're apparently using picks up right on the bank there. Would be easier than bushwhacking from the end of the trail on the map.

Seems to be something in the water there that looks for all the world like an abandoned pickup truck. (I mean, this is Bowie, MD, so it's to be expected)
Going by that, the river would be between 30-40 feet wide, and probably no more than a few feet deep.

I'd build a 2-line bridge, between two trees. One low rope to walk on, one high rope for balance. Bring a strap and hook to hang your bike from the high one, pull it along behind you. Alternatively, you could just rig the high rope, and carry a zipline trolley; Clip on to the rope, pull yourself across, then unhook and be on your way.
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Old 02-03-19, 11:10 PM
  #94  
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Originally Posted by Ironfish653 View Post
I'd build a 2-line bridge, between two trees. One low rope to walk on, one high rope for balance. Bring a strap and hook to hang your bike from the high one, pull it along behind you. Alternatively, you could just rig the high rope, and carry a zipline trolley; Clip on to the rope, pull yourself across, then unhook and be on your way.

I think that's an excellent idea. I used to cross a stream with two tightly strung cables spanning the gap. One cable was for walking on and the other was strung about head height and allowed for reasonably easy crossing. I would carry my bike on my shoulder when crossing though it would have been easier use a pulley or carabiners to transport the bike. It might also be possible to use two slack lines - they're very easy to attach with the ratchet mechanism.

Here's a couple videos showing cable bridges:


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Old 02-06-19, 11:54 AM
  #95  
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There is a public meeting about this bridge on 2/13. Hopefully they will build it soon.
https://www.waba.org/blog/2019/02/pu...-trail-bridge/
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Old 02-11-19, 11:35 PM
  #96  
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Besides the zip line idea, a folding kayak could be an option..... altho, it likely won't save you any time in the end.

Oru Kayak --> amazonDOTcom/Oru-Kayak-Folding-Portable-Lightweight/dp/B06XNS6KT2

Even tho it's a folding kayak, it's narrower & lighter than most other kayaks of the same length (12'), so it should be slightly faster. But it'll still take a few minutes to assemble, even if you've done it enough times to do it blindfolded.

Been wanting one of these for years since I first saw it on Kickstarter, but haven't had a need that was worth blowing $1,200.
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Old 02-12-19, 07:59 AM
  #97  
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Originally Posted by AtomicNumber53 View Post
Besides the zip line idea, a folding kayak could be an option..... altho, it likely won't save you any time in the end.

Oru Kayak --> amazonDOTcom/Oru-Kayak-Folding-Portable-Lightweight/dp/B06XNS6KT2

Even tho it's a folding kayak, it's narrower & lighter than most other kayaks of the same length (12'), so it should be slightly faster. But it'll still take a few minutes to assemble, even if you've done it enough times to do it blindfolded.

Been wanting one of these for years since I first saw it on Kickstarter, but haven't had a need that was worth blowing $1,200.
i would love to have an Oru Kayak as well but i can not really justify that price tag. I mean that is a new bike. I am glad to see they are finally making a two person one.
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Old 02-15-19, 01:40 PM
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Float tube - like for fly fishing. You're welcome.
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