Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Which frame size? really confused.

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Which frame size? really confused.

Reply

Old 02-03-19, 10:57 AM
  #1  
frofro
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Which frame size? really confused.

Hey guys. Tried to post but forum wouldn't let me post with link.

Anyway, I'm 180cm, inseam 81cm and looking for city/touring bike because i have neck problems with my roadbike frame bicycle.
Any ideas should i go with 51-52cm or 53-54cm frame?

Since I can't post pictures, bicycle in question is Stassen Nexus 8 disc or Cross Citerra Urban.
frofro is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-19, 01:04 PM
  #2  
phughes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,076
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
Hey guys. Tried to post but forum wouldn't let me post with link.

Anyway, I'm 180cm, inseam 81cm and looking for city/touring bike because i have neck problems with my roadbike frame bicycle.
Any ideas should i go with 51-52cm or 53-54cm frame?

Since I can't post pictures, bicycle in question is Stassen Nexus 8 disc or Cross Citerra Urban.
I am just under 180cm, 179cm, same inseam, and ride 56cm Long Haul Trucker. I could just as easily have ridden the 54. I believe a 51-52cm frame would be on the small side, at least for my tastes.
phughes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-19, 01:08 PM
  #3  
phughes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,076
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
Hey guys. Tried to post but forum wouldn't let me post with link.

Anyway, I'm 180cm, inseam 81cm and looking for city/touring bike because i have neck problems with my roadbike frame bicycle.
Any ideas should i go with 51-52cm or 53-54cm frame?

Since I can't post pictures, bicycle in question is Stassen Nexus 8 disc or Cross Citerra Urban.
I am just under 180cm, 179cm, same inseam, and ride 56cm Long Haul Trucker. I could just as easily have ridden the 54. I believe a 51-52cm frame would be on the small side, at least for my tastes.

I was unable to see details about the geometry of those frames.
phughes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-19, 02:06 PM
  #4  
frofro
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Originally Posted by phughes View Post
I am just under 180cm, 179cm, same inseam, and ride 56cm Long Haul Trucker. I could just as easily have ridden the 54. I believe a 51-52cm frame would be on the small side, at least for my tastes.

I was unable to see details about the geometry of those frames.
I looked up Long Haul Trucker and it looks like roadbike frame. Isn't the size of the frame (at least seat tube) different for different type of frames?
Unfortunately I can't find the frame geometry for the frames I mentioned as well. Can you tell me what's your seat post to handlebar post length?
frofro is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-03-19, 03:15 PM
  #5  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 8,988

Bikes: '76 Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Burley Samba, Terra Trike

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1253 Post(s)
You need Large. Don’t overthink it!
Darth Lefty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-19, 12:32 AM
  #6  
acidfast7
EU > USA
 
acidfast7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: England / CPH
Posts: 8,237

Bikes: 2010 Cube Acid

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 903 Post(s)
Just pop into a shop and get fitted properly.

Any shop in Germany/Holland will get you fitted correctly even if you don't buy a bike there.

Those bikes are expensive and very durable so don't screw up the fitting at the beginning.

I'm 188 and run a 56cm frame in hardtail MTB and 595mm in FGSS frame style.

Good luck.

edit: I guess you're in Serbia, but that same still applies, just stop by a bike shop and get fitted properly.

Last edited by acidfast7; 02-04-19 at 12:47 AM.
acidfast7 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-19, 11:00 AM
  #7  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,299

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
Hey guys. Tried to post but forum wouldn't let me post with link.

Anyway, I'm 180cm, inseam 81cm and looking for city/touring bike because i have neck problems with my roadbike frame bicycle.
Any ideas should i go with 51-52cm or 53-54cm frame?

Since I can't post pictures, bicycle in question is Stassen Nexus 8 disc or Cross Citerra Urban.
I am (convert convert convert) 181cm, inseam 81cm, and my commuting bike is a Surly CrossCheck with a 60cm frame. Since you have neck problems, you should stop listening to conventional bike-shop race-jock advice, and get a larger frame. Read this, and see if you find it convincing

https://www.rivbike.com/pages/choosing-a-frame-size

In General
People ride bikes that are too small. If you go into a bike shop or ask the local fast riders about frame sizing, you'll likely hear comments such as, "Smaller bikes are lighter, stiffer, more maneuverable, and more efficient."

To that we say this:
Small has to be lighter, but we're talking ounces, and let's not talk about ounces until your belly is so ripped that you're regularly mistaken for one of those guys in the Dance Theater of Harlem. A bike shouldn't have any unnecessary weight, but if the weight comes by means of a larger frame that fits you better, or stronger wheels that stay truer, or a safer frame that doesn't fail catastrophically, then we wouldn't consider that "unnecessary" weight. It's weight that carries its own. ...

Too-small bikes are not comfortable
Every day we talk to folks who bought a $5,500 titanium this, or a $6,500 carbon fiber that, and now that the honeymoon is over, they realize it's not comfortable. Sore neck, sore lower back, sore hand---and almost without exceptions it's caused by a frame that's too small and doesn't let them raise the bars high enough to cure these ills. Understandably, they're feeling foolish and bummed out.

Handlebars too low cause 90 percent of the discomfort people suffer. And buying a frame too small guarantees that the bars will be too low
Sore neck sure sounds to me like you're bent over too much, and having to bend your neck too much to see forward. Bigger frame, higher bars, problem solved (or at least hopefully helped).
RubeRad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-04-19, 11:21 AM
  #8  
acidfast7
EU > USA
 
acidfast7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: England / CPH
Posts: 8,237

Bikes: 2010 Cube Acid

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 903 Post(s)
Originally Posted by RubeRad View Post
I am (convert convert convert) 181cm, inseam 81cm, and my commuting bike is a Surly CrossCheck with a 60cm frame. Since you have neck problems, you should stop listening to conventional bike-shop race-jock advice, and get a larger frame. Read this, and see if you find it convincing

https://www.rivbike.com/pages/choosing-a-frame-size



Sore neck sure sounds to me like you're bent over too much, and having to bend your neck too much to see forward. Bigger frame, higher bars, problem solved (or at least hopefully helped).
Informative post.

I agree 100%.

I feel that drop bars and race geometries are often forced on riders, especially commuters.

A shop and proper fit is really the way to go. The bikes that the OP posted are both of excellent quality and last forever if they're sized correctly from the start.
acidfast7 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-19, 11:53 AM
  #9  
phughes
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 1,076
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 199 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
I looked up Long Haul Trucker and it looks like roadbike frame. Isn't the size of the frame (at least seat tube) different for different type of frames?
Unfortunately I can't find the frame geometry for the frames I mentioned as well. Can you tell me what's your seat post to handlebar post length?
Yeah, I tried finding the geometry for the frames you are interested, but could not. I sincerely believe though the smaller frame size would be cramped for you. If you can get a bike shop to fit you, it would be worth it.
phughes is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-19, 12:16 PM
  #10  
HardyWeinberg
GATC
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south Puget Sound
Posts: 8,672
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
Hey guys. Tried to post but forum wouldn't let me post with link.

Anyway, I'm 180cm, inseam 81cm and looking for city/touring bike because i have neck problems with my roadbike frame bicycle.
Any ideas should i go with 51-52cm or 53-54cm frame?

Since I can't post pictures, bicycle in question is Stassen Nexus 8 disc or Cross Citerra Urban.
I am ~173cm , ~76cm (pants, not cycling) inseam and I ride 53-54cm frames so I would suspect you might want a 54 or larger...
HardyWeinberg is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-19, 12:28 PM
  #11  
frofro
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
If I got this correctly seat tube length is different for different type of bikes. On few sites i found they are suggesting 56-57cm for road bike, which has horizontal tob tube, and 53cm for trekking/city bike. I do have bike with roadbike type of frame 55cm and handlebars are too far away. I'm even more confused now since most of the sites suggest 52-54cm and some of you guys suggested even 60cm.

Problem with fitting is that all the bike shops were I live are crappy at doing it. Actually they don't do it at all. Biggest one sold MTB with 56cm frame to my friend who is 203cm tall and he has neck problems now. He got MTB with seat, when adjusted toto h size, higher than handlebars.
frofro is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-19, 01:49 PM
  #12  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,299

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Yes, unfortunately seat tube length is a poor choice for The universal bike size number. It made more sense in the old days when every top tube was level, but nowadays the more a top tube slopes, the less the seat tube length, while the bike "size" could remain identical.

Reach from seat to handlebars is a much better measure, and for horizontal top-tube bikes, will be pretty similar to seat tube length (which just adds to the confusion)

So the Geometry page for my Surly CrossCheck (horizontal top tube), shows for my size
Size 60cm
Seat tube length (center-top) 600.0mm
Top Tube Length (center-center) 599.8mm
Effective Top Tube Length (center-center) 600.0mm

For this bike actual and effective are near-identical because the tube is horizontal. For sloping-tube bikes, actual top tube length is pretty useless, and effective is what you want to focus on.
RubeRad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-05-19, 06:09 PM
  #13  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 39,638

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 167 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6193 Post(s)
Basic.. straddle middle of the top tube, flat footed , off the saddle..

1 hand on the bars, 1 hand on the saddle,

Lift the bike straight up .. How far off the ground are the tires..?
fietsbob is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-19, 12:11 PM
  #14  
frofro
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2019
Posts: 4
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Thanks to all of you guys, on the end I purchased 55cm trekking frame bike. Handlebars have adjustible stem and are sitting higher than the seat, I'm really pleased with the purchasse.

Top tube is not horizontal and with both legs on the ground I'm almost hitting the top tube with my pubic bone, so I guess thats the biggest frame i could get. Bike is equipped with nexus 8, suntour front suspension, front/back lights and rear rack which is factory welded to the frame. Total weight 17kg. So far so good.
frofro is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-17-19, 04:35 PM
  #15  
Korina
Banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 814

Bikes: 2016 Giant Live Rove Lite 2004 Giant OCR1, 1993 Women's Giant Rincon, 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (frame)

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Having my own sizing issues, it seems that if you get the right standover, the rest can be tweaked. Y/N?
Korina is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-19, 09:07 AM
  #16  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 36,503

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 387 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5044 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Having my own sizing issues, it seems that if you get the right standover, the rest can be tweaked. Y/N?
Generally, yes.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-19, 11:14 AM
  #17  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,036

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
If I got this correctly seat tube length is different for different type of bikes. On few sites i found they are suggesting 56-57cm for road bike, which has horizontal tob tube, and 53cm for trekking/city bike. I do have bike with roadbike type of frame 55cm and handlebars are too far away. I'm even more confused now since most of the sites suggest 52-54cm and some of you guys suggested even 60cm.
For your height and inseam, a 56 to 58 cm road and a 55cm mountain (20”) will work. I would suggest going towards the higher end of the scale but ride them to see for sure. Going to a 60 cm will make the bars further away and is probably too large.

The issue with your 55cm bike may be due to the stem length rather than the top tube length. A shorter stem may be all you need but, generally, a 55 cm bike is usually be kind of cramped for most people.

I would take Grant Pederson’s advice with a grain of salt about the size of Denmark.

Problem with fitting is that all the bike shops were I live are crappy at doing it. Actually they don't do it at all. Biggest one sold MTB with 56cm frame to my friend who is 203cm tall and he has neck problems now. He got MTB with seat, when adjusted toto h size, higher than handlebars.
The shop that sold your friend a 56cm (22”) mountain bike was spot on for someone his height. Anything shorter would have been cramped and difficult to ride. Anything taller would have been too stretched for a mountain bike. The stem on the fork may have been cut off too short but the size of bike is the proper size.

The length that forks are cut to is often too short. I cut my own forks...and build my own bikes...so I cut them longer than what is “normal”.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-19, 03:25 PM
  #18  
chas58
Senior Member
 
chas58's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 3,292

Bikes: too many of all kinds

Mentioned: 21 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 616 Post(s)
Originally Posted by frofro View Post
Thanks to all of you guys, on the end I purchased 55cm trekking frame bike. Handlebars have adjustible stem and are sitting higher than the seat, I'm really pleased with the purchasse.

Top tube is not horizontal and with both legs on the ground I'm almost hitting the top tube with my pubic bone, so I guess thats the biggest frame i could get. Bike is equipped with nexus 8, suntour front suspension, front/back lights and rear rack which is factory welded to the frame. Total weight 17kg. So far so good.
Great!

Generally I size a bike for the top tube length, as every thing else can be tweaked. Typically the handlebar reach can be tweaked +/- 20mm by changing the stem.

Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Having my own sizing issues, it seems that if you get the right standover, the rest can be tweaked. Y/N?
Focus on getting the correct top tube length. Everything else can be adjusted to that.
But, if you get that wrong, it will be painful to ride the bike for very long.

As a rule of thumb (for bike with the bars at or below seat level), if the length of the reach is correct you will not be able to see the front hub, because the handlebars obscure your view. If you can see the front hub - the top tube / reach is too long or short.
chas58 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-18-19, 06:58 PM
  #19  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,036

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2264 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Korina View Post
Having my own sizing issues, it seems that if you get the right standover, the rest can be tweaked. Y/N?
For some reason people are under the impression that stand over height is an unimportant frame parameter. It’s about the only thing that can’t be changed to make the bike fit. The other parameters...like the overhyped “top tube length”...may result in some discomfort but that is going to be more long term. Get the stand over height wrong and you won’t have to wait to experience discomfort.

Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
Great!

Generally I size a bike for the top tube length, as every thing else can be tweaked. Typically the handlebar reach can be tweaked +/- 20mm by changing the stem.


Focus on getting the correct top tube length. Everything else can be adjusted to that.
But, if you get that wrong, it will be painful to ride the bike for very long.

As a rule of thumb (for bike with the bars at or below seat level), if the length of the reach is correct you will not be able to see the front hub, because the handlebars obscure your view. If you can see the front hub - the top tube / reach is too long or short.
Someone who is small and for whom there are few frames made will tell you that the top tube length means diddly when it comes to how a bike fits. When you are only 5’ tall, there isn’t much room between the bike and your sensitive bits with most any standard wheel configuration. Bailing off on a bike that is too big for a rider that is too small results in acute pain vs chronic pain.

Frankly, I find the same to be true and am far more concerned about standover than top tube length. I have some adjustment for top tube...move the saddle forward or shorten the stem...but standing on tippy toes just isn’t an option.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-19, 09:45 AM
  #20  
Korina
Banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 814

Bikes: 2016 Giant Live Rove Lite 2004 Giant OCR1, 1993 Women's Giant Rincon, 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (frame)

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Originally Posted by chas58 View Post
Focus on getting the correct top tube length. Everything else can be adjusted to that. But, if you get that wrong, it will be painful to ride the bike for very long.
Hmm. That's funny, because I test rode a Kona Dew Plus in size medium, and it fit like a dream; I didn't want to take it back to the shop. But the top tube was gently nestled against bone. How do I adjust for that?
Korina is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-19, 09:49 AM
  #21  
Korina
Banana slug
 
Korina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Arcata, California, U.S., North America, Earth, Saggitarius Arm, Milky Way
Posts: 814

Bikes: 2016 Giant Live Rove Lite 2004 Giant OCR1, 1993 Women's Giant Rincon, 1988 Specialized Rockhopper Comp (frame)

Mentioned: 9 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
For some reason people are under the impression that stand over height is an unimportant frame parameter. It’s about the only thing that can’t be changed to make the bike fit. The other parameters...like the overhyped “top tube length”...may result in some discomfort but that is going to be more long term. Get the stand over height wrong and you won’t have to wait to experience discomfort.

Someone who is small and for whom there are few frames made will tell you that the top tube length means diddly when it comes to how a bike fits. When you are only 5’ tall, there isn’t much room between the bike and your sensitive bits with most any standard wheel configuration. Bailing off on a bike that is too big for a rider that is too small results in acute pain vs chronic pain.

Frankly, I find the same to be true and am far more concerned about standover than top tube length. I have some adjustment for top tube...move the saddle forward or shorten the stem...but standing on tippy toes just isn’t an option.
Thank you! Yes! Exactly! You can adjust the stem, and the saddle, heck even the cranks, but not the height of the bike, unless you change the wheel size, which has its own complications.
Korina is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-19, 05:28 PM
  #22  
robertorolfo
Senior Member
 
robertorolfo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2017
Location: Queens, NY for now...
Posts: 784

Bikes: 82/82 Lotus Unique, 86 Lotus Legend, 89 Basso PR

Mentioned: 30 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 452 Post(s)
Do you guys generally find that you prefer frames on the larger end of your useable range, or lower end?

I read somewhere that smaller frames sometimes feel better (this was in reference to steel, so perhaps they were stiffer), but sometimes I ride my father's bike just for fun (it's an 80's Ross Gran Tour that just sits in his garage), and I kinda like the way it feels. It's definitely a little too big for me (I can only stand over it on my tippy toes with the top-tube snug against my undercarriage), but when I 'climb up on it' and get going, it sorta feels cool to be on such a big/tall frame. Am I strange?
robertorolfo is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-19-19, 06:18 PM
  #23  
Darth Lefty 
Disco Infiltrator
 
Darth Lefty's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Folsom CA
Posts: 8,988

Bikes: '76 Paramount, Salsa Timberjack, Burley Samba, Terra Trike

Mentioned: 52 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1253 Post(s)
Dropper posts have introduced a new wrinkle to MTB sizing. If you use a frame too large you will need a shorter extension dropper. Newer bikes have shorter seat tubes for full extension. Size medium full suspension bikes used to be 17" but now they come with 15" seat tubes to accommodate 150 or 175mm droppers. The change has been less extreme for hard tails but frames that were 18" are now 17" for 125mm droppers.

I can tolerate a frame that's size L and have for many years but my latest bike is M and it's where I should have been all along. This is a trail hardtail MTB so it definitely is about the length of the cockpit, whether you want to call that reach or top tube length or whichever. There's enough stand-over on any of them.

Trek's "G2" geometry they inherited from Fisher includes a frame size between M and L. I don't think anyone else does that, and I think it's great they do.
@robertorolfo a good steel sport touring bike just feels like that... ime
__________________
Genesis 49:16-17
Darth Lefty is online now  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-19, 10:43 AM
  #24  
RubeRad
Keepin it Wheel
 
RubeRad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: San Diego
Posts: 8,299

Bikes: Surly CrossCheck, Moto Fantom29 ProSL hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Originally Posted by robertorolfo View Post
Do you guys generally find that you prefer frames on the larger end of your useable range, or lower end?

I read somewhere that smaller frames sometimes feel better (this was in reference to steel, so perhaps they were stiffer), but sometimes I ride my father's bike just for fun (it's an 80's Ross Gran Tour that just sits in his garage), and I kinda like the way it feels. It's definitely a little too big for me (I can only stand over it on my tippy toes with the top-tube snug against my undercarriage), but when I 'climb up on it' and get going, it sorta feels cool to be on such a big/tall frame. Am I strange?
I definitely prefer on the larger end. On a smaller bike (lower top tube, shorter wheelbase) I feel like a circus bear
RubeRad is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 02-20-19, 10:49 AM
  #25  
noglider 
aka Tom Reingold
 
noglider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: West Village, New York City
Posts: 36,503

Bikes: 1962 Rudge Sports, 1971 Raleigh Super Course, 1971 Raleigh Pro Track, 1973 Raleigh Twenty, 1974 Raleigh International, 1975 Viscount Fixie, 1982 McLean, 1996 Lemond (Ti), 2002 Burley Zydeco tandem

Mentioned: 387 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5044 Post(s)
Having no clearance under your pubic bone is a problem for some. But some of us don't mind tipping the bike to the side in order to stand over it.
__________________
Tom Reingold, tom@noglider.com
New York City and High Falls, NY
Blogs: The Experienced Cyclist; noglider's ride blog

“When man invented the bicycle he reached the peak of his attainments.” — Elizabeth West, US author

Please email me rather than PM'ing me. Thanks.
noglider is online now  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service