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Old 02-06-19, 09:23 PM
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My new fix: Add some sealant and forget about it.
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Old 02-07-19, 12:22 AM
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Those tyres do not look like good quality and also are quite expensive. Pick up some Schwalbe Marathons are be done with it or as we say "set it and forget it." Should run around £/€15-20 a tyre.
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Old 02-07-19, 12:32 AM
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Holy cow, it's Andy. That's been a while.
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Old 02-07-19, 09:57 AM
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You have new tires and tubes, so try them and see how well they work.
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Old 02-07-19, 10:31 AM
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Quality control is at an all-time low for stuff like bicycle tubes. I went through a dozen or so defective ones last year. Leaks around the valve stems, bad seams, areas where the rubber is too thin and ruptures at random. All kinds of strange stuff, but they were generic tubes I got off Ebay really cheap. I've learned my lesson about buying cheap inner tubes, the hassle of constant unexplained flats is nowhere near worth saving a couple bucks.

But if this is happening with Schwinn-branded tubes too, that's really sad if Schwinn stopped caring about basic stuff like that. I have never been much of a believer in "self-sealing" anything, FWIW. Though that idea is making a comeback these days with tubeless setups.
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Old 02-07-19, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
Quality control is at an all-time low for stuff like bicycle tubes. I went through a dozen or so defective ones last year. Leaks around the valve stems, bad seams, areas where the rubber is too thin and ruptures at random. All kinds of strange stuff, but they were generic tubes I got off Ebay really cheap. I've learned my lesson about buying cheap inner tubes, the hassle of constant unexplained flats is nowhere near worth saving a couple bucks.

But if this is happening with Schwinn-branded tubes too, that's really sad if Schwinn stopped caring about basic stuff like that. I have never been much of a believer in "self-sealing" anything, FWIW. Though that idea is making a comeback these days with tubeless setups.
Does "Schwinn" even exist any longer? I assume someone just bought the rights to use the brand name and just pump low-quality products through the system.
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Old 02-07-19, 11:47 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
Quality control is at an all-time low for stuff like bicycle tubes. I went through a dozen or so defective ones last year. Leaks around the valve stems, bad seams, areas where the rubber is too thin and ruptures at random. All kinds of strange stuff, but they were generic tubes I got off Ebay really cheap. I've learned my lesson about buying cheap inner tubes, the hassle of constant unexplained flats is nowhere near worth saving a couple bucks.

But if this is happening with Schwinn-branded tubes too, that's really sad if Schwinn stopped caring about basic stuff like that. I have never been much of a believer in "self-sealing" anything, FWIW. Though that idea is making a comeback these days with tubeless setups.
I agree. Had probably 2 of the last 5 or 6 tubes ripped around the seam where the valve stem joins the tube. Brand new tubes, straight into the garbage. Wonder if more expensive tubes would make a difference. I pretty much buy the cheapest ones.
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Old 02-07-19, 02:51 PM
  #33  
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Originally Posted by liampboyle View Post
I'm thinking coincidence (lose valve core on one, and possible cat involvement on the other - our new kitten thinks my tires make a good scratching post) but this has me thinking that tubeless conversion might not be a bad idea.
Different tires have different levels of flat protection.
But the tires you listed don't even claim flat protection...so it's a pretty good bet they don't have any.

The cheapest tires I would go for are basic schwalbe marathons ($36.48 in around your size):
https://www.amazon.com/Schwalbe-Mara...T0/?th=1&psc=1

Someone else mentioned the Continental Contact's ($38.91):
https://www.amazon.com/Continental-C...dp/B002SR05IA/

Schwin was a reputable brand in the 70's and 80's, unfortunately, nowadays the brand only sells cheap knockoff stuff. Both Continental and Schwalbe are quality brands.

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Old 02-07-19, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
There are different level so flat protection with tires.
But the tires you listed don't even claim flat protection...so it's a pretty good bet they don't have any. At all.
From the Amazon listing,
Schwinn bike tire with puncture guard has a folding wire bead and a Kevlar tread center that reduces punctures and makes for a sturdy replacement
So they claim Kevlar. But... "folding wire"?
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Old 02-07-19, 03:18 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
From the Amazon listing, So they claim Kevlar. But... "folding wire"?
Wow I searched the page for "flat" and "protection" and got nothing...I swear the item description didn't say that a minute ago. Hmm.

Good point, but I'd still say that the flats are most likely the result of poor quality tires. I don't think you can buy a decent tire for $20 if you want something that's flat resistant, decent rolling, etc.
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Old 02-07-19, 03:21 PM
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It's true that Schwinn is just a licensing name. Or maybe it's more than that. It's not all completely junk. The Schwinn bikes at department stores are department store bikes. There are some Schwinn bikes at bike shops, too, or at least there were in recent years, and they're not junk.
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Old 02-08-19, 08:19 AM
  #37  
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Fixed the flats, so back on the road this morning. Ended up just buying a new tube for the rear wheel (Slime tube from Wallyworld, LBS wasn't open before work when I had time to run in). So far so good, spoke to my LBS about getting some of the Continentals before much longer.
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Old 02-08-19, 12:50 PM
  #38  
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Get a new PUMP (or five) before going much further. At $5-10 apiece on CL or at your local co-op/kitchen, I feel they're something you can't have too many of.

Schwinn is now a Dorel Industries brand. IIRC, they were under the Pacific Cycles umbrella previously. So yeah, mostly just a badge/name now.
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Old 02-11-19, 09:59 AM
  #39  
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Also - sounds like you found the problem, but check your wheels, especially for spoke tension, where you said they're near 25 years old. I had to chuck a wheel with no tension left and corroded nipples (winter bike), and have had other wheels start poking holes in tubes. I'm now better at wheel maintenance - winter wheels barely get touched still, though.
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Old 02-11-19, 01:20 PM
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I'm a daily commuter biker. Over the last year I tired the Continental GatorSkin. I'm not sure how they compare in the product line to the Continental Contact but I was unimpressed with the GatorSkin. I went back to my standby, Specialized Armadillo. The Armadillo last me about 9 months on the back with very few flats and nearly forever on the front. I've been using them consistently for 15 years and nothing even comes close.
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Old 02-11-19, 01:25 PM
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Rim tape?

Have a close look at the rim tape. Did you say these are the original rims? Rim tape can cause flats if it's old and protrudes into the spoke nipple area - it stresses the tube. If you don't know this it can drive you crazy trying to stop the flats.
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Old 02-11-19, 01:50 PM
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mtbaddict has it right about low pressure.
robertorolfo has it right about Vittoria Corsa G.
rhm has it right about randomness.
Lemond 1985 has it right about QC for innertubes.


I ride light tires. The citybike, a modified DL-1, is running on Compass Snoqualmie, as light and unprotected as it gets. I'm in Chicago and ride alleys, vacant lots, whatever. Our streets are fairly rugged too. No flats a year and a half on that bike. Two of three other bikes have sewups, two flats past year. Another bike has Compass Stampede and Vittoria Corsa, one flat past year to a defective innertube. Hard to see how I could do much better were I riding around on tank treads. Let some air out of your tires. For that matter stiff tire casings will tend to make sharp objects drive in. Then you need major armor. Supple casings just flex around. My light, light tires don't even have cut marks. Let some air out of your tires.

Best quality innertube currently available is Schwalbe. Get them from UK. Including shipping you can get them for less than cost of generic junk purchased domestically.
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Old 02-11-19, 01:51 PM
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Tube valve stem

Make sure valve core stem from tube is sticking striaght out from the tire rim. A crooked valve stem stresses rubber where it enters tube and will cause the tube to leak.
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Old 02-11-19, 02:20 PM
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Interesting thread. Interesting also the leaps some people make in response to a one time negative experience. I am hearing more and more about people wanting to go tubeless. As I understand it this will necessitate a completely new wheelset and also the requisite tires, sealant and repair tools. I don't know, even when I used Big Apples and/or Marathons and had to deal with the occasional flat I never found that a spare tube and tire levers weren't enough. But the real breakthrough was when I bought a bike with Bontrager Hardcase clinchers. Haven't had a flat since. It's been years. I no longer carry flat repair tools. I don't even worry about talking about them in open forum. They are that good. FWIW.
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Old 02-11-19, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Phamilton View Post
I agree. Had probably 2 of the last 5 or 6 tubes ripped around the seam where the valve stem joins the tube. Brand new tubes, straight into the garbage. Wonder if more expensive tubes would make a difference. I pretty much buy the cheapest ones.
Just how cheap are these cheap tubes (US$ preferable)?

I've been getting various Vittoria, Michelin, Continental and Richey tubes on sale (usually $4-5 each), and I haven't had a significant defect yet (knock on wood).
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Old 02-11-19, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
Interesting thread. Interesting also the leaps some people make in response to a one time negative experience. I am hearing more and more about people wanting to go tubeless. As I understand it this will necessitate a completely new wheelset and also the requisite tires, sealant and repair tools. I don't know, even when I used Big Apples and/or Marathons and had to deal with the occasional flat I never found that a spare tube and tire levers weren't enough. But the real breakthrough was when I bought a bike with Bontrager Hardcase clinchers. Haven't had a flat since. It's been years. I no longer carry flat repair tools. I don't even worry about talking about them in open forum. They are that good. FWIW.
Thanks for the tip, but I gotta ask, how do they fare against goathead thorns? Do you ever encounter any of those in your local area?
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Old 02-11-19, 02:53 PM
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Flats

I used to have so many flats that I was ready to give up biking being up in age . I tried Schwalbe products and am EXTREMELY pleased. Used a few different models from them and always good results, being older I can remember paying less for car tires however it was years ago and this in no way is any kind of deterrent from not using this product.
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Old 02-11-19, 03:21 PM
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Is there a chance you pinched the tubes when you mounted the tires? If your technique is poor, you could have done the same pinch to both and you were just lucky that both didn't go completely flat.


Tricks I have learned: 1) put a little air in the tube. A really easy way to get this right - blow the tube up by mouth. Before you start seating the second tire bead, stuff the tube into the tire AND onto the rim. 2) As you go around seating the rim. push the tube into place ahead of the bead. (It will try to squeeze out despite that first effort.) 3) Before inflating, go around the entire tire squeezing the sidewalls and beads in with your hands and looking to see that no tube is seen under those beads. 4) Inflate to a low pressure, remove the pump, then spin the wheel and look for the reference line molded into the tire just above the rim. It should remain an even height as you spin the wheel. If if hops up and down, deflate and adjust the tire beads, looking for pinched tube. Repeat 4) When the tire passes this test, inflate to full pressure.


Also, look for the causes of your flats. The tubes are your first clue. Look for where the flats are, how many holes in the tube for that flat and what the holes look like. Here, patching tubes has its real advantages, 1) you get all the holes because until you do, the tube on't hold air. More info on the cause. 2) you have the location documented. Now, find the same location on the tire. (You did either mount the tire with the label at the valve or directly across, did you not? Or if you didn't, you left the tire on the rim while you removed the tube or just enough of the tube to patch it, no? And if "no" to both questions, take this as a learning experience.)


Common causes of flats - glass, tiny wires, thorns. Usually one tiny hole. Construction debris - often a slash in both tire and tube. Pinch flats from not enough air in the tires or hitting too deep a pothole pavement edge - very often tow small holes or short slashes side by side on the tube. With pinch flats, the tire is almost always just fine and rewuires no attention but all the rest may well require a patch or boot on the tire to prevent future flats. Regular patches work just fine for very small holes from glass, wire, etc, but slashes in the tire will require a boot, ie a patch of real structural strength to keep the casing together at full pressure. You also want to look to make sure the cause if the flat isn't still in the tread. Single tiny holes may well be from very short pieces of car tire wire that is still in the tire tread and casing. If you do not find and remove it, that tiny wire will cause you another flat. Not maybe. Only question if the time. You are not home free because you cannot see it. Again, those patches on the tube and lining up the tire label with the rim are real benefits. Now you know exactly where to look for that invisible wire. (It did have to leave a tiny cut on the tread, It can be found!)


Don't quit this until you've found the cause. If you inadvertently tossed some of the evidence, well, do better next time.


Ben
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Old 02-11-19, 03:57 PM
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+++1

I ran into a similar problem in the past (tho, wasn't both tires). Replaced the inner tube, filled it and found it flat the next morning. Pulled the tire (again and didn't see anything sticking out of the tire. Pulled the inner tube, located the hole in it and used that to locate the place on the tire from where the puncture could have come. Sure enuf, a thin wire (maybe a small staple?) was sticking thru the tire (wasn't very much, almost unseeable). Yet, on the outside of the tire there was nothing obvious. Got out a magnifying glass and looked more closely. Found the other end of the wire but it had been worn down to the level of the tread. Almost impossible to find.

Now when I get a flat, before I install a new or fixed tube, I always run my finger along the inside of the tire to feel for anything poking thru the tire. Haven't had the unexpected secondary flat since.

"Why is there always time to do something twice, but never enuf time to do it right the first time?"

[QUOTE=

....snip.....
I think you really owe it to yourself though to figure out what caused the other tires to go flat. It could have been something as simple as pinched inner tubes. Or it might be glass, tacks, goat heads, or who knows what?

I like to sit under a nice bright light and feel the inside of the tire where it contacts the tube, checking for anything poking through. Then use a knife blade and tweezers to completely remove it like you would a sliver in your finger. Once you figure out exactly what caused the flats, you'll have a much better chance of avoiding future ones, otherwise you're just throwing money around trying different tires and tubes.[/QUOTE]
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Old 02-11-19, 05:53 PM
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Yeah you can't buy Schwinn brand stuff, you also can't buy Walmart stuff either.

I guess what I can't figure out is that you had two flats so why couldn't you fix them instead of walking?

If flats are an issue due to goatheads you need to get beefier tires like, Schwalbe Marathon Plus or Marathon Supreme, Conti Gatorskin Hardshell, Vittoria Rubino Pro G+, Vittoria Randonneur, Michelin Power Endurance, Specialized Roubaix Pro or Armadillo All Condition, and Bontrager Hardcase series of tires. Next you should add a tire liner, problem with liners is that they can be heavy, but if you want to make sure you don't get a flat they're great added protection, the best is the RhinoDillos, these come with one end that has a soft edge to it so it won't rub a hole into the tube as you ride. I'm not a fan of thorn resistant tubes, they don't work in my opinion unless the thorn is really small but useless against goatheads, and they're heavier than liners. I'm also not a fan of sealants for high pressure tires, they tend to dry out after awhile which means you need to add more after about 3 months, and some like Slime won't work once the psi gets above 70, not to mention the mess they can make of your rim.

I too live in S California so I have some experience with goatheads, those things are very tough, if they hit just right they can penetrate even the best tire with a liner! But probably 99 times out of 100 they won't hit just right enough to penetrate all your defenses.

Some of the tires I mentioned are heavy, you have to decide if you want to make sure that you don't get any flats and go with the heaviest ones, or are you willing to sacrifice one or two flats during the life of a tire for a lighter tire.

But you do need to learn how to fix a flat on the side of the road. Of course most people simply replace the tube and then go home and fix the flatted tube, so carry a spare tube, but you also need to be able to put a patch on a tube on the side of the road just in case you flat a second time. Also you should consider carrying a tire boot patch in case you get a larger hole if you decide against a tire liner, the boot will keep the tube from blowing through the hole or another something like a small pebble hitting the hold and killing the tube again; tire boots are not permanent, they will come loose and move after 2 or 3 rides, so if the hole is big it's just a way to get home so you can get a new tire, the hole is small keep reading. I carry a tube of superglue so when I boot a hole, or see a cut or small hole I fill it with the superglue from the outside of the tire, sometimes you may have to refill it several times after several rides before there's enough to permanently close the hole.

Make sure you carry a decent pump, about 95% of the mini pumps on the market won't get anywhere near their max pressure ratings, in fact most won't get to 75psi not alone some 220 psi rating they gave it. I know there maybe 3 or 4 mini's that reach that high but the best one for those is the large version of the Lezyne Road Drive, it takes fewer strokes to get to 100 then any other current pump on the market, their medium size one will take a lot more strokes and effort to get to 100, and I doubt their small one will get to 100.
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