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riding with rush hour commuter traffic

Old 07-01-19, 08:40 AM
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rumrunn6
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riding with rush hour commuter traffic

lights a fire in yer belly, don't it?

meaning, compared to road riding other times of the day, or on the weekend & especially compared with riding a paved rail trail

rather than a tempo based on yourself, we have to adjust for prevailing traffic & circumstances. I think this is more tiring but also a better workout
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Old 07-01-19, 10:54 AM
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I purposely don't ride WITH traffic when commuting. I take a lot of side streets and cut behind shopping centers (where the delivery bays are and stuff) all to avoid being in traffic as much as possible.

It's safer per mile than running on the main 2 roads through my area. But when I have to cross those roads it's like playing Frogger at rush hour.

I'm safe, but I have to hustle to be safe.
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Old 07-01-19, 11:08 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
lights a fire in yer belly, don't it?

meaning, compared to road riding other times of the day, or on the weekend & especially compared with riding a paved rail trail

rather than a tempo based on yourself, we have to adjust for prevailing traffic & circumstances. I think this is more tiring but also a better workout
I enjoy it, it's fun. Not for all my riding but, it's good sprint and interval training for me.

In my town, the traffic lights don't react to bikes, so when I see a light turn green up wayyy up ahead, I know I'm gonna need to be on the bumper of the last car through the intersection to have a prayer of getting a green. That's my sprint training. And then I draft off the pack of cars going 35-40 mph, for as long as I can, those are my intervals.
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Old 07-01-19, 11:13 AM
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i go about 1.1 miles out of my way to catch an MUP that keeps me off-street for 75% of my commute.

and another 12% of my route (the final mile into downtown evanston) is on a protected bike lane.

so i just don't have a whole lot of interaction with impatient and frustrated rush-hour motorists.

that's by design.



but ages ago, i used to ride through downtown chicago everyday (in the pre-bike lane era), and that was harrowing at times (effing cab drivers are THE WORST!).

now that i'm middle aged with children depending on me to stay alive, i can't say that i miss it.

Last edited by Steely Dan; 07-12-19 at 03:30 PM.
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Old 07-01-19, 11:21 AM
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Most of the time when I ride with rush hour traffic I'm crossing busy roads without a traffic light. That means I'm often stopping half way across waiting for another break in traffic and get to sprint to get across whereas the rest of the time I'm on side streets or paths with a lot less traffic.

Knowing it was going to be too hot and/or rainy for me to commute this week I went out for a ride last night to get some exercise and ended up exploring my new neighborhood. I ended up coming out on some of the busy streets and didn't recognize them at first due to the lack of cars. Nice for me then, but much different than during rush hour.
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Old 07-01-19, 12:35 PM
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Mornings aren't an issue for me as I leave early enough and the traffic is light when I do have to be on the road. As for my ride home, that is a different story but I take MUP's probably about 90% of my route so I don't have to get in with all the cars. I have two busy roads my MUP crosses and the cars have the right of way but they usually all stop and let bikers and pedestrians go so it isn't too bad to get through. After that, I run for a couple of miles along a busy main street but have a MUP that runs parallel to it so while cars are zipping by me at 50 mph I have some separation. I do have three intersections to deal with but other than waiting on the light to change, most people are pretty respectful for me when crossing. I actually have more issues navigating the increased number of users on the MUP's in the afternoon commute than I do dealing with the cars.
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Old 07-01-19, 12:38 PM
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Children of the 80's understand.

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Old 07-01-19, 12:48 PM
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My town is big enough to have more than two streets, but not so big that all of the streets are jammed during rush hour. On the bike, rush hour is the time of day when I go to work or come home. Since most of the traffic is on the larger roads, there's a huge variation on how long a commute will take in the car, depending on traffic, accidents, special events, etc.: 12-40 minutes. If it takes me more than 10% longer than normal on the bike, it's because I decided to take a long way.

Hardly counts as fire in my belly. That's the hot salsa from the Mexican restaurant.
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Old 07-01-19, 12:55 PM
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There's definitely a game aspect to it. It's feels great to be free and on a bike, around a bunch of people trapped in steel boxes on their way to jobs they probably hate. Especially if I have the day off. Forced staycations due to lack of work have their benefits.

Commuters do sometimes seem to be highly impatient, and will often pass pretty closely. I guess they have their commutes timed down to the millisecond, and some bike on the road that causes them to miss a green light and be delayed 30 extra seconds is pretty unforgivable, worthy of a close pass or honk of the horn. The good part is that if they ever hit you, they'll be easy to track down since they're probably on that same road at the same time every day.
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Old 07-01-19, 02:21 PM
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I like having control over most of my commute of whether I want to deal with rush hour traffic, or get to the MUP as soon as possible. I often don't make that decision until I leave work and see how it looks.

The worst of it is getting on or off base (I work on a military installation), but the drivers are pretty good on base (cuz if they do hit, they'll have to deal with the MPs). Almost 70k people working on base, and only 3 entrances/exits, makes for some sporty lines getting out the gate, but I bypass a lot of cars that way.

I actually hate those days I need to drive because I know how bad the traffic is. All of the main routes I take have really wide shoulders (wide enough to be another car lane, really), so the stop and go traffic on them doesn't bother me, I spend most of my time passing cars, not the other way around.
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Old 07-01-19, 02:37 PM
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riding with rush hour commuter traffic
Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
lights a fire in yer belly, don't it?

meaning, compared to road riding other times of the day, or on the weekend & especially compared with riding a paved rail trail

rather than a tempo based on yourself, we have to adjust for prevailing traffic & circumstances. I think this is more tiring but also a better workout
Originally Posted by Skipjacks View Post
I purposely don't ride WITH traffic when commuting
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
i go about 1.3 miles out of my way to catch an MUP that keeps me off-street for 75% of my commute.

and another 12% of my route (the final mile into downtown evanston) is on a protected bike lane.

so i just don't have a whole lot of interaction with impatient and frustrated rush-hour motorists.

that's by design
.

but ages ago, i used to ride through downtown chicago everyday (in the pre-bike lane era), and that was harrowing at times (effing cab drivers are THE WORST!).… i can't say that i miss it.
Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
There's definitely a game aspect to it. It's feels great to be free and on a bike, around a bunch of people trapped in steel boxes on their way to jobs they probably hate.
I have posted to this thread: "New York City Cycling -- CRAZY!!!"
Originally Posted by C.Jester View Post
...I’ve always felt safer riding in heavy traffic in town than out on the back roads. At least if I get hit in town, there are witnesses and someone to call 911
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
The weird thing is that traffic in NYC is aggressive, but I find it easier to survive than other places.

I'm not sure I'm ready to say NYC drivers are better than in other places, because it may simply be that I understand the dance and know how to do it .
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
As a social ballroom dancer with years of lessons, as well as urban commuter, may I say, "Well said."

There was thread once about rural vs urban cycling, and a concensus was that urban cycling was safer, because of the congestion and slower speeds. Even with heavy traffic, I know the patterns of traffic, the "dance steps," and can anticipate the car's movements.

Earlier on this thread, I wrote: An important aphorism I learned on BF is, "To know where a car is going, watch the front wheels, not the body or hood," though we don't watch our feet when we dance.

riding with rush hour commuter traffic

Originally Posted by Stun View Post
My experience is that people drive differently in every city and treat cyclists very differently. The best advice often comes from cyclists that live the closest to you …

The exception here would also be Jim from Boston--anyone that can successfully commute around Boston has my full respect and probably knows how to deal with about every intersection imaginable!

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-01-19 at 04:43 PM.
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Old 07-01-19, 02:50 PM
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haha nice vid! never saw that one before. I can personally attest to horses on the highway, tho! this is Route 2 Acton




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Old 07-01-19, 02:52 PM
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First guy: That's a funny looking car you've got there. How many horsepower is it?

Second guy: One.

Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
haha nice vid! never saw than one before. I can personally attest to horses on the highway, tho! this is Route 2 Acton


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Old 07-01-19, 02:53 PM
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There's a big difference between fast moving rush-hour traffic and congested rush-hour traffic. In fast moving traffic, the cars will try to either race you to the lights or intersection or try to bully you out of the way if they don't have room to change lanes. Those I try to avoid. Sometimes, at a light, I wait for the bulk of the traffic to go by before I proceed.

In congested traffic, there's not much any car can do but to sit there and inch along while you pass them all.

And then there's fast moving traffic that gets halted by some sort of lane restriction or road construction. I take advantage of those so I don't have to use my alternate route.

Yeah, I know I'm trying to show off.
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Old 07-01-19, 03:39 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
lights a fire in yer belly, don't it?
Do you mean taking the lane all the time?

I ride as fast (a.k.a. slow) as I feel like in the bike lane, whether car traffic next to me is 20mph or 60mph, dense or light.
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Old 07-01-19, 04:17 PM
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I take the light rail an extra two stops past 'optimal' to route through a safer course on the way home for this reason. That makes what would be a 4 mile commute closer to 5.5. On days where I ride the whole way home I take a 21 mile route with 2k feet elevation gain instead of an 18 mile route with 750 feet elevation gain in order to avoid the worst traffic snarls. So I go three miles out of my way and 1250 feet extra elevation gain to reduce my traffic exposure.

My morning commute is all downhill to the light rail, and the roads in that direction have better bike lanes, so I'm both less exposed, and riding closer to the speed of the flow of traffic. That being the case I just take the direct route (4 miles).
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Old 07-01-19, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
lights a fire in yer belly, don't it?
The first time I sat at the head of the line in front of a traffic light waiting for the green, taking the lane until I could cross four lanes of traffic and get established on the far side, was The. Biggest. Thrill. I felt like such a bad-a$$. Every muscle taut, ready to leap forward at the green. Fantastic.
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Old 07-02-19, 05:38 AM
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That's usually when my rear wheel slips in the dropouts, right on cue, on my very first pedal stroke. Due to the immense power transfer, of course.

Seriously though, on some days it feels like life or death out there, and it's a great motivator for feats of strength, and moments of great cunning. Of course it helps that you can fit through small gaps in traffic and out maneuever the living hell out of any car that rolls on 4 wheels. I definitely "get it" when it comes to riding in traffic, it's a blast.
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Old 07-02-19, 05:46 AM
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I don't ride in heavy traffic often which makes the rush of adrenaline more fun when I do.
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Old 07-02-19, 08:43 AM
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lol my goal riding on the street is to avoid rushes of adrenaline.
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Old 07-02-19, 08:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
…Seriously though, on some days it feels like life or death out there, and it's a great motivator for feats of strength, and moments of great cunning.

Of course it helps that you can fit through small gaps in traffic and out maneuever the living hell out of any car that rolls on 4 wheels. I definitely "get it" when it comes to riding in traffic, it's a blast.
I previously posted to this thread, "Commute by bike? But that's dangerous!"
Originally Posted by noglider View Post
Everyone knows that cycling is dangerous. Except that everyone who knows this is wrong. Traveling by bike is one of the safest ways to commute, safer than driving a car.

​​​​​​​Cycle, walk, drive or train? Weighing up the healthiest (and safest) ways to get around the city
Originally Posted by EnjoyinTheRide View Post
I personally don’t road cycle not in the sense of what really goes on. But I would say that I could understand families and friends having concern because even I as a driver get nervous passing cyclists, particularly in the larger groups.

And let’s be honest there is a lot out of your control. I mean you have traffic coming behind you, passing you within feet, sometimes going beyond speed limits (vehicles). And let me throw the worse thing out here in that let’s add texting while driving, cell phoning while driving and with all the new gadgets (cameras, tv's etc) they put in these vehicles there's more distraction for drivers.

I get the sense that the majority of cyclists do ride on the roads they feel comfortable on and do it as responsible as one can. But families and friends might not get that part of it as easy as the "drivers" side most understand.....
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
Generally I get kudos or just indifference towards my cycling, mostly as a year-round commuter here in Metro Boston, even after my serious accident four years ago. The most hostile remarks, particularly in Winter, are from those drivers who fear for themselves to hit me.

Of course I contend with their fears using many of those talking points as mentioned above ["Once again: Health VS Cycling Accidents" (link)]. One soft argument I read on Bikeforums is that cycling in traffic really does look dangerous to car drivers ensconced in their vehicles.

Personally I feel pretty safe, well-lit, with unlimited vision with mirrors, and pretty nimble on my bike. Nonetheless, I’m totally attentive to the cars around me, and I have a number of safety aphorisms in my mind to keep me alert (link).


Once though, I was standing on a busy intersection (Massachusetts and Commonwealth Aves) one Saturday night watching some happy-go-lucky student-type cyclists on Hubway Bike Share bikes, no helmets, riding along and laughing in traffic, and I thought to myself that really does look dangerous.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 07-02-19 at 08:51 AM.
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Old 07-02-19, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Lemond1985 View Post
That's usually when my rear wheel slips in the dropouts, right on cue, on my very first pedal stroke. Due to the immense power transfer, of course.
Yeah, that has some pucker power. Only matched by sitting first at the red light, and snapping the crank as I started. I didn't quite crash, but the cager second in line had to demonstrate his horn. (Wish that type drove a vehicle with a turn signal...)
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Old 07-02-19, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
Yeah, that has some pucker power. Only matched by sitting first at the red light, and snapping the crank as I started. I didn't quite crash, but the cager second in line had to demonstrate his horn. (Wish that type drove a vehicle with a turn signal...)
Intense traffic seems to have an adverse effect on my ability to engage clipless pedals on the first try. Left turn lanes are even worse, and the worst of all is uphill starts. I've practiced for twelve years with both SPD and SPD-SL systems. Both of them become like I'm wearing shoes with soles of greased ball bearings when the light turns green on an uphill start with traffic piled up all around me. On my commuter bike I've switched over to MTB platforms, and they're great for commuting.
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Old 07-02-19, 12:43 PM
  #24  
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
Yeah, that has some pucker power. Only matched by sitting first at the red light, and snapping the crank as I started. I didn't quite crash, but the cager second in line had to demonstrate his horn. (Wish that type drove a vehicle with a turn signal...)
Dang, dude, them's some serious legs! Props!
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Old 07-02-19, 12:45 PM
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With a top cruising speed of 14 mph, I ride AFRAP.

That said, I did a stupid last week and got in the left turn lane of a busy intersection. Don't know what got into me; fortunately it wasn't the cager behind me.
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