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Improving visibility on rain and dark

Old 11-18-19, 09:22 PM
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phtomita
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Improving visibility on rain and dark

Today I got rain coming back home and is pretty dark 6:30 PM around here.
If I get a car coming, I can't see pretty much anything ahead of me with my glasses wet and a bit fog on inside.

Is there any good product to clean/apply on the glasses to improve visibility in these conditions?
I am thinking on cleaning and apply/rub those sheets for the car windshield that helps a lot on the car.

What you use on your glasses?
Thank you in advance for any suggestion/advice.
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Old 11-18-19, 09:48 PM
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Rain-X. First, clean your glasses using a solution of vinegar and water. Don’t use ammonia based glass cleaner. Then apply the Rain-X according to the instructions. Be sure to polish the lenses well with a clean cloth. If you don’t polish well, you’ll get hazing and halos. I’m not sure why Rain-X is not advised for polycarbonate lenses because I’ve used it myself on safety glasses, motorcycle windshields, and helmet visors without any ill effects. When applied properly and polished well, Rain-X is amazingly effective.


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Old 11-18-19, 09:56 PM
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I'm trying out monovision contact lenses to avoid that very problem. I'm off the bike now for unrelated reasons, but thus far I think it's going to work.
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Old 11-18-19, 10:09 PM
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Are these prescription lenses? If not, i would simply ride without the glasses in those conditions. The light glare from raindrops at on the lenses at night, fogging, and overall decreased visibility probably make it safer to ride without the lenses.
If these are prescription, I have no suggestions other than maybe contact lenses.
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Old 11-19-19, 12:30 AM
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Originally Posted by SalsaShark View Post
Are these prescription lenses? If not, i would simply ride without the glasses in those conditions. The light glare from raindrops at on the lenses at night, fogging, and overall decreased visibility probably make it safer to ride without the lenses.
If these are prescription, I have no suggestions other than maybe contact lenses.
Yes, mine are prescription glasses. I can see all blurry and at least if there is something big in the path without glasses.
There is a downhill path at the side of the freeway with cars coming with lights on (even when weather is dry is sometimes a bit challenging to see).
Today, I couldn't see much because of rain, so actually was trying to see from above my lens .
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Old 11-19-19, 02:22 AM
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I've only been in your situation once and it wasn't good. I decided next time I'll just take my glasses off. They're prescription but only moderately strong, for distance vision only, and they were worse than useless with water on them.

I have clear safety glasses now too, maybe I'll go the Rain-X route on those like Kedesto recommended and just wear those.

My real worry though is whether cars can see me in rainy dark conditions. If their windshield wipers are at all streaky ...
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Old 11-19-19, 04:14 AM
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Originally Posted by phtomita View Post
Today I got rain coming back home and is pretty dark 6:30 PM around here.
If I get a car coming, I can't see pretty much anything ahead of me with my glasses wet and a bit fog on inside.

Is there any good product to clean/apply on the glasses to improve visibility in these conditions?
I am thinking on cleaning and apply/rub those sheets for the car windshield that helps a lot on the car.

What you use on your glasses?
Thank you in advance for any suggestion/advice.
I also wear prescription glasses, and the best thing that ever happened to me was getting a helmet with a detachable visor.

When those rain + headlights situations happen, I now just run my gloves over the visor, it gets rid of the water and it’s sorted the issue each time.

My major issue was having distorted vision due to the water drops on my glasses and lights in my eyes made it more difficult, the visor solves that, and it’s easier to run my glove over the visor than it was my glasses.

In addition, I run two lights at the front, one is pointed slightly down, so I can see the ground in front. You may need to slow down a bit, but you can navigate.
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Old 11-19-19, 05:51 AM
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This happened to me on my early morning, very dark, ride the other day. Glasses got completely fogged up in some serious fog (common this time of year). Had to stop and put them in my pocket and just ride naked sans glasses for 48 more miles. It was fine, but with that fog on the lenses, super dangerous. I will have to try that RainX solution. Maybe that will help.
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Old 11-19-19, 06:06 AM
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Improving visibility on rain and dark
Originally Posted by phtomita View Post
Today I got rain coming back home and is pretty dark 6:30 PM around here. If I get a car coming, I can't see pretty much anything ahead of me with my glasses wet and a bit fog on inside.

Is there any good product to clean/apply on the glasses to improve visibility in these conditions?
I am thinking on cleaning and apply/rub those sheets for the car windshield that helps a lot on the car.

What you use on your glasses?

Thank you in advance for any suggestion/advice
Originally Posted by GUMK View Post
I also wear prescription glasses, and the best thing that ever happened to me was getting a helmet with a detachable visor.

When those rain + headlights situations happen, I now just run my gloves over the visor, it gets rid of the water and it’s sorted the issue each time.

My major issue was having distorted vision due to the water drops on my glasses and lights in my eyes made it more difficult, the visor solves that, and it’s easier to run my glove over the visor than it was my glasses.

In addition, I run two lights at the front, one is pointed slightly down, so I can see the ground in front. You may need to slow down a bit, but you can navigate.
I have previously posted.
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I wear a billed baseball cap under my helmet as a “canopy” to keep my eyeglasses relatively clear with occasional swipes with a finger…
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
I perennially post about my winter eyewear for my 14 mile year-round commute, from about 35° down to as low as 0°. I must wear my prescription eyeglasses, and fogging is one of the worst dangers of winter riding. I am entirely satisfied with my system:…

Finally, last Monday I rode in a sleety, wintry mix, and wore a billed baseball cap under my helmet. My prescription eyeglasses stayed dry and clear, and my vision was good with occasional swipes of the goggles with a gloved finger.…
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
IME, and from reading numerous posts on the subject, there are three basic methods for preventing fogging, caused by exhaled moist air onto the cold surface of the eyeglasses and goggles:...

3. Antifogging agents, like Cat Crap, soap, spit etc.:I find that when exhaling forcefully, and colder temperatures, say under 20° F, those agents can be overcome. That’s why I suggest
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
…that any recommendations for winter riding include description of the conditions in which they are employed, i.e. lowest temperature and distance.
I’m not trying to be contrarian about any methods used, but I am zealous because fogging is a difficult and dangerous challenge to winter riding, and would keep me off the bike for about 3 to 4 months during the year.
No need to further comment on good lighting.

Last edited by Jim from Boston; 11-19-19 at 06:23 AM.
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Old 11-19-19, 07:32 AM
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For many years now, I've been cleaning my glasses with hand-soap and warm water. It definitely helps with fogging, although at stoplights I need to breath with a pronounced overbite to help direct the breath away from the glasses. A dozen or so years back I tried a kid's toy snorkle from the dollar store to conduct my breath back over my shoulder. IT worked, but was a disgusting,uncomfortable mess at the end of the commute.

As far as rain, I can still see distance well enough over the top of my glasses to do that. My newest rain cape came with a clear visor on the hood, but it was wrinkly and caused more fog on my glasses, so I fold it back.
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Old 11-19-19, 09:03 AM
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Old 11-19-19, 11:31 AM
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I'm dealing with this. I'm in the rain at night often, especially this month. My only saving grace is that my glasses prescription is mild, and I can live without my glasses when the rain is a big problem. But I use a rearview mirror attached to my glasses, so when I take them off, I end up mirrorless. I might try Rain-X. First, I'm going to try putting a soap film on my glasses. I'll apply soap and buff it off without water. I've heard that can work.
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Old 11-19-19, 11:36 AM
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I have same issue. Can't see without glasses, can't see with them in the rain.
A large helmet visor, makes no difference in heavy rain.
I find I can navigate better without the glasses as shapes are not blocked/distorted.
Turns out one doesn't have to see that well to cycle
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Old 11-19-19, 12:15 PM
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Originally Posted by noisebeam View Post
A large helmet visor, makes no difference in heavy rain.
But in light rain, a visor or the brim on a cap can keep light rain off the lenses!
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Old 11-19-19, 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by pdlamb View Post
But in light rain, a visor or the brim on a cap can keep light rain off the lenses!
Not in my experience. Even external fog results in water drops all over lenses.
When moving forward drops come from the front, not the top.
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Old 11-19-19, 12:40 PM
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Originally Posted by noisebeam View Post
Not in my experience. Even external fog results in water drops all over lenses.
When moving forward drops come from the front, not the top.
IME, just angling my head down, and looking through the tops of my glasses, will keep fog off my glasses for the better part of a 10 mile commute. In light rain, I can usually make 6-7 miles before I need to wipe the glasses with a billed cycling cap.

We'll have to agree to disagree on visors and brims.

Re: wiping glasses, it's worth while making sure wet weather gloves have something like an absorbent thumb back. Even when wet, they'll get enough water off my lenses that I can see better.
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Old 11-20-19, 04:54 PM
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I've seen some people wearing a giant brim attached (it seems) by elastic, and it goes all around the helmet. That seems like a great thing to try. Where can I get one? Or what should my search terms be?
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Old 11-21-19, 09:53 AM
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Tom, I think you're looking for Da Brim:
https://www.adventurecycling.org/cyc...-helmet-visor/

The two people I've seen using them seem to ride a bit slower than I do. I suspect keeping the wind down is one reason they both liked it so much.
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Old 11-21-19, 10:53 AM
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Da Brim you say? I like the looks of the classic. I may have to get one.
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Old 11-21-19, 05:32 PM
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Originally Posted by noglider View Post
I've seen some people wearing a giant brim attached (it seems) by elastic, and it goes all around the helmet. That seems like a great thing to try. Where can I get one? Or what should my search terms be?
+N on a visor being far more effective than any treatment or device for glasses/goggles. Da Brim is too extreme for just rain, but presumably good for sun in Africa or south. Rain can be taken care of with the Taiga Helmet Cover or Salamander Beak Visor.
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Old 11-22-19, 09:46 AM
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Thanks, @2_i. Those are nice. I still haven't found the one whose brim is of the same width all around the helmet. But one of those two might be nice.
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Old 11-30-19, 09:09 AM
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I haven't had problems with fogging eyeglasses when outside. It's usually only happens when i walk indoors from a cold exterior. Condensation only occurs when the cold glass encounters warm and moist air, like from your breath when you exhale. when I'm in motion, the exhaled breath doesn't reach my eyeglasses. When I'm at a standstill, the glasses might fog from the breath for 2 seconds, but it immediately clears up. However, I don't normally have freezing temperatures here.

When it's near freezing, I wear ski/mtb googles over-the-glasses (otg) to protect my eyes from drying out. The goggles do fog up on the inside when I'm at a standstill from skin sweat, but clears up after 5 seconds when I'm in motion again, because it's got some vents on the top and bottom, with a double layer polycarbonate lens. If it rains, lots of drops tend to stick to the plastic lens, and I simply wipe it with my gloves.

I do use a visor on my helmet. It does reduce the amount of water that hits my eyeglasses when it rains (when I'm not wearing goggles over them). But even if my eyeglasses are wet, it doesn't fog up. The lens does have some anti-scratch-UV-glare coating. I don't know if this has any effect. I also wash my glasses daily with soap. I don't know if this affects anything either.

I don't know if I'd want to apply other chemicals like Rain-X to my glasses, as I don't know if it would cause problems if it were to get into the eyes.

However, if I wear a balaclava, I do have problems with fogging on my glasses, due to the breath being directed upwards. I bought another balaclava with holes around the mouth and nose, and it helps to reduce the fogging a little bit.
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Old 11-30-19, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by tomtomtom123 View Post
When it's near freezing, I wear ski/mtb googles over-the-glasses (otg) to protect my eyes from drying out. The goggles do fog up on the inside when I'm at a standstill from skin sweat, but clears up after 5 seconds when I'm in motion again, because it's got some vents on the top and bottom, with a double layer polycarbonate lens.

If it rains, lots of drops tend to stick to the plastic lens, and I simply wipe it with my gloves.

Ido use a visor on my helmet...I also wash my glasses daily with soap. I don't know if this affects anything either.

I don't know if I'd want to apply other chemicals like Rain-X to my glasses, as I don't know if it would cause problems if it were to get into the eyes.

However, if I wear a balaclava, I do have problems with fogging on my glasses, due to the breath being directed upwards. I bought another balaclava with holes around the mouth and nose, and it helps to reduce the fogging a little bit.
I have previously posted (link) pertinent comments on this current thread. See also:
Originally Posted by Jim from Boston View Post
"Colder weather - glasses fog up issue."

I perenially post my approach to the problem, most recently on the Winter Cycling Forum. Considering how frequently this question arises I have also frequently posted: including a dispute with the dishsoap / spit solution.

And I look forward to trying this newly-posted solution:
Originally Posted by scoatw View Post
I use an old Iditarod trick I saw back in 09 of Jay Petervary,a veteran rider of the 1000 mi trip to Nome. In addition to wearing a balaclava, I cover my nose and cheeks with a fleece headband. This gives my breath an opening to escape without going up my goggles when covered with the balaclava.

This is my 11th winter of daily commuting. I always had fogging problems below 10'f. I used it at 0'f and it worked great.
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Old 12-05-19, 09:31 PM
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The problem with Rain-X is that it leaves a film on the lens.
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