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Affordable rain gear recommendations for a newb...

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Affordable rain gear recommendations for a newb...

Old 01-04-20, 06:15 PM
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Scott6283
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Affordable rain gear recommendations for a newb...

Hi everyone, I am new to the forums. I am currently a fair weather commuter but would like to commute more often even if it is raining a bit.(I live in the PNW) My question is what would you all recommend as far as relatively affordable rain gear? Iíve seen ponchos that cover the rider and the bike and I have seen lightweight rain suits that can go over clothing with a helmet cover but Iím not sure which way to go or really what to look for in rain gear for cycling. Any help would be great!
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Old 01-06-20, 11:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Scott6283 View Post
Hi everyone, I am new to the forums. I am currently a fair weather commuter but would like to commute more often even if it is raining a bit.(I live in the PNW) My question is what would you all recommend as far as relatively affordable rain gear? Iíve seen ponchos that cover the rider and the bike and I have seen lightweight rain suits that can go over clothing with a helmet cover but Iím not sure which way to go or really what to look for in rain gear for cycling. Any help would be great!
Experiment with the cheapest first? If it works, stick with it; if not, try something else. Sorry, my rain gear is a bus pass.

You'll probably get 37 responses with 43 opinions. Hopefully some are useful.
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Old 01-07-20, 12:57 AM
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Welcome to the forums.
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Old 01-07-20, 01:50 AM
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The ponchos or capes or whatever you want to call them can be good and also can be pretty affordable, so maybe try one out and see. Not my cup of tea, personally, but some pepople really like them.

I got a solicitatioon fo ra complete rain "suit" from amazon today for maybe 39 bucks or something w/ free shipping. No idea of that company, but there is a lot of inexpensive rain gear on amazon. Pricing is ll over the map for this stuff. I saw a rain jacekt from a well-known company that looked nice the other day. It was abou t $450. I'm sure it's really nice. I hope it is. I won't be buyin git.

Most people who live in places like Eugene or Portland or Seattle who love it, and most seem to, do so because they do not allow the rain to keep them from doing what they want to do. Rain-avoidance isn't really a thing. It's more of an Embrace The Rain And Go Ride 60 MIles All Geared Up type deal. For a lot of people, anyway. That said, with the weather being so dry this year, I still have not had to ride in the rain much this year. So, for now, it sorta can be avoided. A bit.

So, I say, try out a couple affordable options and see what you like. Or, just go for the home run now and buy a bunch of Showers Pass. I have some waterproof socks from them that were 37 dollars (!), but you know what, they were well worth it--they're waterproof!
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Old 01-07-20, 02:06 AM
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Thanks for the input. I was looking at some of the inexpensive rain suits on amazon so I may go that way to start with. I have looked at the showers pass stuff and while it is nice the price isnít lol
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Old 01-07-20, 08:42 AM
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Ex Police coat

Originally Posted by Scott6283 View Post
Thanks for the input. I was looking at some of the inexpensive rain suits on amazon so I may go that way to start with. I have looked at the showers pass stuff and while it is nice the price isnít lol
A foul weather Gortex coat (not the jacket) will cost you about 700 USD retail. Buy a hi viz debadged ex Police one for a tenth of that. There are plenty on eBay sold by the official government disposal department. It will last decades. Not aero but you arrive at work bone dry.
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Old 01-07-20, 08:47 AM
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an inexpensive rain suit might work fine, but I'd rather try the item(s) on. we have a local Outdoor Store that carries these, in varying levels of quality & price. something to look at, is leg length, cuz you want them long enough to cover your ankles. arm length too, due to body position on the bike. some have cheap elastic cuffs for wrists & ankles, some are better & more comfortable & some are just open & you can use an ankle band. shoes or shoe covers & gloves will be something to look at too. for an inexpensive helmet cover you can use a cheap motel style shower cap, but if you haven't collected any from recent motel stays, maybe you can find something similar online? once you get to work you'll need a place to hang that stuff to dry. I used t work at a place that had a boiler room, so it was warm & dry & the business owner didn't mind me draping my stuff all over for the day cuz the door was mostly closed

I have these shoe covers but haven't used them much. they have a good bottom platform/sole & they're easy to get on. the zipper is a good feature. they are thin & not expensive. I got the biggest they sell & they fit on size 13 shoes, but not hiking boots

FixWhat Waterproof Motorcycle Bike Shoes Covers,Reusable Anti-Slip Rain Snow Shoes Overshoes Gear Zipped Shoes Men Women Rain Covers


these shower caps look close to like what I've used, but you don't need so many or to dispose of them, cuz w/o abuse they are quite durable

Disposable Hair Plastic Shower Cap - (Pack of 100) Clear Women Shower caps Waterproof Bath Hat Processing Hair Cover for Treatment Spa Hair Salon and Home Use

I think barmitts are the best way to keep hands dry. they make them for straight bars & drop bars

Docooler Handlebar Mitts Pogies Mittens for Cold Weather Riding MTB Fat Bike Motor Bar Covers Winter Thermal Cover Bike Hand Warmer with Thick Neoprene: 6mm - Features: Warm, Rainproof, Windproof












back to ankle bands for a second. I've got tall boots, not for riding. when the snow gets deep, the snow pushes the legs up. so I tied string around the base to keep my rain/snow pant legs down over the boot. turns out they are reusable! been on these boots since January 2015!


winter (2014-15) was tough for filling the bird feeder!

Last edited by rumrunn6; 01-15-20 at 12:36 PM.
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Old 01-07-20, 10:24 AM
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Those ponchos are nice. I haven't had one in a long time. I hear they can be bad if you have a strong crosswind, but I don't have enough experience to say.
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Old 01-14-20, 10:56 PM
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I also ride in PNW. Rain or shine. My go to rain jacket and rain pants are from J&G in Eugene, OR. Both are around 10 years old. Recommended. At that time each piece was $45. No idea what they are now. 30 years ago and a lot more disposable income and I spent the $$$ for Gore-tex but unless you are ice fishing you will be better off just cheaping out on coated nylon. You are going to get just as wet either way. In rain, especially in PNW, trying to stay bone dry is an exercise in futility. I try to stay warm. If I'm warm I can deal with some wet. J&G sell a helmet cover but I use a showercap. Pastel blue and pink in a two for $3.99 and I don't feel bad poking a hole in it for my helmet mirror. Rain chaps (Rainlegs) are worth what they cost.
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Old 01-15-20, 02:53 AM
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i am not sure ,for rainy weather , i often would use pannier bags also waterproof socks to keep myself and my necessities to dry, i would use the sealskinz socks before ,but it is expensive , then my friend introduce the cheaper one ,named waterfly waterproof socks, cheap but high quality, hope it helps
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Old 01-15-20, 08:21 AM
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I bought a Showers Pass rain jacket at REI Seattle that was good but here in NYC I never use it. I don't know if they are still made. I wouldn't buy a Gore-Tex or anything that is expensive because it'll get dirty after one ride and you won't want to use it for anything other than cycling.
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Old 01-15-20, 07:51 PM
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You've gotten some good advice so far, but my skim of this thread didn't catch the best advice for foul-weather commuting: fenders. Maybe you already have them...But if not, get them. And get long ones. And then add a leather mudflap to the tail end of the front fender so that you have coverage almost all the way to the pavement, and hence no wheelspray hitting your shoes, pedals, and bottom bracket.

Without fenders, your tires will spray water back up onto you and the bike, and it's water from the road -- i.e., dirty, oily, grimy. With fenders, you and the bike will still get wet, but only from rainwater - which is clean.
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Old 01-16-20, 01:37 AM
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After two 30-mile rides in the rain:

wo rides in rain after having been totally clean prior.
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Old 01-16-20, 12:59 PM
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I too am a big fan of fenders (but not on my road bike), but water spray doesn't just travel in line with the tire, in line with the frame. when you turn the wheel a little it now sprays to one side. also it sprays to sides if you get a little depth to the water





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Old 01-16-20, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
I too am a big fan of fenders (but not on my road bike), but water spray doesn't just travel in line with the tire, in line with the frame. when you turn the wheel a little it now sprays to one side. also it sprays to sides if you get a little depth to the water
From the looks of the latter two photos, I think your fenders might be standing a bit too proud of your tires. Getting them closer would reduce the spray. (Though it could just be the angle of the photos.)
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Old 01-17-20, 10:01 AM
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
From the looks of the latter two photos, I think your fenders might be standing a bit too proud of your tires. Getting them closer would reduce the spray. (Though it could just be the angle of the photos.)
my point was fenders provide no protection from spray from the sides & from turning the wheel. in order to protect us from that, we'd have to have something that looks like this

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Old 01-17-20, 10:44 AM
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Originally Posted by rumrunn6 View Post
my point was fenders provide no protection from spray from the sides & from turning the wheel. in order to protect us from that, we'd have to have something that looks like this
Oh, sure, I understand. But that big mudflap in your second photo must help a bit with that. Those things are the best.
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Old 01-17-20, 12:30 PM
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Originally Posted by Koyote View Post
Oh, sure, I understand. But that big mudflap in your second photo must help a bit with that. Those things are the best.
just found this pic too, of a different bike, tiny OEM mudflap. the spray from turning my wheel (w/o a longer fender &/or mudflap), while riding in snow, covered my toes w/ snow. so like you said longer fenders & a proper mudflap are ideal



back to my MTB, the fenders do stand off as you pointed out. don't want stuff getting caught up in there. I DIY'd the mudflap. it definitely catches stuff. but when/if it gets pulled off on a ride, I can put it back on pretty easily with the binder clips. but before I put it back in place I can see where the junk goes w/o it! I want to DIY something that will protect my front chainrings, but also some kind of sheild to keept stuff from my rear tire flying onto my chain



it's so big, it's funny to see the different positions it takes during rides












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Old 01-21-20, 09:14 AM
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Frogg Toggs are a good choice. Many of them are designed for motorcycle riders, so they definitely work. They might not be as breathable as biking specific gear, but it's pretty inexpensive by comparison.

I have Novara rain pants and jacket, but almost never use them anymore since I just ride the velo when it's raining now.

Those got me through 3 years in Seattle though, so they definitely do the trick.
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Old 01-22-20, 01:46 PM
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I am a big Pearl Izumi fan. The arms are long enough for me and their warranty/service is fantastic. Not too expensive. Whatever you get, let it get dirty, maybe wash it once in a while but keep it away from heat.
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