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Why is Seatylock integrated seat/lock not more popular?

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Why is Seatylock integrated seat/lock not more popular?

Old 02-03-20, 11:00 AM
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PDXCarless
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Why is Seatylock integrated seat/lock not more popular?

I'm looking at it as a second lock to supplement my U-lock and like that it means I don't have to find a way to also secure my seat. There are plenty of reviews about various folding locks, but barely any info on the Seatylock integrated-seat model that has now been out there for around 5 years and not being any more expensive than the straight folding lock (Foldylock) by the same manufacturer. . Any opinions out there?
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Old 02-04-20, 09:04 AM
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My guess is that until now, nobody's ever heard of it.
It seems like a good idea to deter the honest theives for a few minute café stop.

I see no shortage of bikes picked clean by vultures. The only reasonable deterrant to wholesale theft locally seems to be: Front wheel u-locked to frame, rear wheel u-locked to frame, frame u-locked to rack. No accessories. Even so a seatpost with saddle or the stem/bars/shifter assembly can walk away in seconds by any junkie with a 4 or 5mm allen wrench & a pair of linemans pliers or dikes.

Saddles can be very particular. Maybe if there were more than '"comfort" & "trekking" models it might appeal to a greater variety of butts.

The Dutch commuter bike & mentality has yet to really take off in America. So I would expect any real utility cycling product to be a tough go for wide adoption.

From a philosophical standpoint, I like this, if we lived in a theft free world. it's light weight & around €30 But I suspect the first time it was used, in Portland, Seattle or elsewhere, the whole bike would go on a junkies shoulder as he rode his BMX bike to the nearest blackberry patch adjacent to the freeway to be "improved" in a meth induced "repair" session.

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Old 02-04-20, 11:10 AM
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I've never heard of seatylock but I kind of like it. Also because I'm pretty tall and my seat post is maxed out this might get me another half to one inch of effective post length.
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Old 02-04-20, 11:19 AM
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Never heard of it.
https://seatylock.com/collections/se...-chameleon-red
First reaction: looks gimmicky, lots of places for slop between seat post and seat, can't use my own saddle preference
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Old 02-04-20, 11:22 AM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
My guess is that until now, nobody's ever heard of it.
From a philosophical standpoint, I like this, if we lived in a theft free world. it's light weight & around €30 But I suspect the first time it was used, in Portland, Seattle or elsewhere, the whole bike would go on a junkies shoulder as he rode his BMX bike to the nearest blackberry patch adjacent to the freeway to be "improved" in a meth induced "repair" session.
I look at a good u-lock as absolutely necessary and anything else as supplementary. That being said, I run my u-lock through the back wheel and the frame, secured to a rack. My back wheel has a Nuvinci CVT hub on it so it represents about 50% of the bikes value. My front wheel has a dynamo on it so I'd like to have more than just a simple cable looped through it. If I could have the frame lock you referenced for my front wheel, I'd consider it. However, i don't see how to mount it on the front. The Seatylock I'm considering would be for my front wheel, but would also allow it to go around another post of the typical U shaped bike rack. It would just be less weight than a second u-lock but also solve the seatpost/saddle post protection. I'm not that picky about my saddle on a commuter bike and would buy the Seatylock today if I could find any picky reviews about it's pros and cons. I worry about the seat not being secured well to the proprietary quick release mount resulting in a slightly moving seat ("slop").

UPDATE: I did find some reviews on that link (posted above) that were at least not 100% glowingly positive. It seems there is a bit of slop in the seat. Now, I'm wondering if I would just get used to it. This is for commuting, errands and everyday city-biking, not performance biking. It could also be a good solution for my Brompton which I've never been able to mount a lock that doesn't get in the way of the fold.

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Old 02-04-20, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by PDXCarless View Post
I look at a good u-lock as absolutely necessary and anything else as supplementary. That being said, I run my u-lock through the back wheel and the frame, secured to a rack. My back wheel has a Nuvinci CVT hub on it so it represents about 50% of the bikes value. My front wheel has a dynamo on it so I'd like to have more than just a simple cable looped through it. If I could have the frame lock you referenced for my front wheel, I'd consider it. However, i don't see how to mount it on the front. The Seatylock I'm considering would be for my front wheel, but would also allow it to go around another post of the typical U shaped bike rack. It would just be less weight than a second u-lock but also solve the seatpost/saddle post protection. I'm not that picky about my saddle on a commuter bike and would buy the Seatylock today if I could find any picky reviews about it's pros and cons. I worry about the seat not being secured well to the proprietary quick release mount resulting in a slightly moving seat ("slop").

UPDATE: I did find some reviews on that link (posted above) that were at least not 100% glowingly positive. It seems there is a bit of slop in the seat. Now, I'm wondering if I would just get used to it. This is for commuting, errands and everyday city-biking, not performance biking. It could also be a good solution for my Brompton which I've never been able to mount a lock that doesn't get in the way of the fold.
I suppose it could solve the front wheel &/or seat theft concern well. Or at least be a deterrant for a while. At $90, I don't see why not. I, for one have way spent more for way less. A good serious lock can run that much by itself. Even as a visual (probably it's greatest strength) it would cause second thoughts. If paired with a proper u-lock as a primary, I doubt the risk/reward equation would would be deemed worth the hassle by a thief.

You could buy it & report back what you really think. If it's cheezy, you could always return it, right?
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Old 02-04-20, 09:06 PM
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The problem with slop is it tends to work itself worse.
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Old 02-04-20, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by base2 View Post
My guess is that until now, nobody's ever heard of it.
It seems like a good idea to deter the honest theives for a few minute café stop.

I see no shortage of bikes picked clean by vultures. The only reasonable deterrant to wholesale theft locally seems to be: Front wheel u-locked to frame, rear wheel u-locked to frame, frame u-locked to rack. No accessories. Even so a seatpost with saddle or the stem/bars/shifter assembly can walk away in seconds by any junkie with a 4 or 5mm allen wrench & a pair of linemans pliers or dikes.
This ^^^^

I would like to ride my bike to some where other than work but honestly it's not worth it. Too many things to lockup. lights; cadence sensor, front rim, handle bars, stem, seat/seat post. And that's just for rookie thief. A real thief that is prepared with a buddy and van/pickup can cut/pick/pry open any lock that you are willing to carry on you.
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Old 02-05-20, 10:01 AM
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Most of the reviews on their page are 5 stars everything is great, or 4 stars it's great but has a little slop. I personally feel that the tiniest slop would completely ruin it for me, just a guess as I've never ridden a seat with slop. Anyway, that makes me wonder if any of the reviews are from people who do lots of riding whether frequent or high miles or both. My feel of the reviews was that it's mostly people who ride to the bagel shop 2 miles away once a month or so. I really like the concept and would completely forgive the extra weight, but the idea of movement in my seat is a no-go.
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Old 02-05-20, 11:09 AM
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Originally Posted by RoadKill View Post
Most of the reviews on their page are 5 stars everything is great, or 4 stars it's great but has a little slop. I personally feel that the tiniest slop would completely ruin it for me, just a guess as I've never ridden a seat with slop. Anyway, that makes me wonder if any of the reviews are from people who do lots of riding whether frequent or high miles or both. My feel of the reviews was that it's mostly people who ride to the bagel shop 2 miles away once a month or so. I really like the concept and would completely forgive the extra weight, but the idea of movement in my seat is a no-go.
Lots of us now (not in commuting but in MTB) are riding dropper posts, that have a little bit of play. However it's down in the collar, not up at the clamp, so it's not rocking, and body weight times 5-7" moment tends to take out the slack pretty well.
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Old 02-05-20, 01:29 PM
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I like my folding lock - a good compromise between size and security for me. I don't think combining one with a seat is a good idea. I'll keep mine attached to my bottle cage bosses.
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Old 02-06-20, 11:27 AM
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Thanks for the input, everyone. I think I'm going to hold off on this for a while in hopes I can try one out somewhere.
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