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-   -   Schwalbe Marathon Plus 25C's (https://www.bikeforums.net/commuting/1226952-schwalbe-marathon-plus-25cs.html)

Welshboy 03-28-21 09:40 AM

Schwalbe Marathon Plus 25C's
 
Wow! These have to be the hardest to fit (and also the most expensive) tyre I've ever encountered and it's seriously got me thinking about how I'd manage if I get a flat on my 12-mile each way commute or is there any chance they'll soften up a bit after racking up a few hundred miles or so?

I bought two of these this week after a couple of rear wheel flats and I first tried fitting them to a Shimano wheelset that are designed for tubes and tubeless and thought that might be the problem as I find most wired-on tyres are a bit harder to fit on tubeless ready wheels. Anyway, I have an old pair of road wheels with Mavic Open Pro rims going spare so I thought I'd try them on those but whilst I did eventualy get them on it was a huge struggle and it's not something I'd like to do at the roadside. I'm really thinking about sticking with lighter tyres and accepting the occasional flat as part of the commuting experience and, to be fair, I'm pretty good at changing a tube at the roadside. But if I do stick with these Marathon Plus tyres and I get no flats between now and the end of September (when I retire) then I guess I'll be raising a glass to the Schwalbe designers!

PaulH 03-28-21 12:00 PM

Pre-Covid, I was driving and biking about the same distance per year and getting about the same result between flats on both -- around 15,000-20,000 miles. I think you will be raising a glass.

sweeks 03-28-21 07:50 PM

Plan on raising that glass!
I've been riding Marathon Plus tires for at least ten years and have never had a flat due to a puncture. One valve stem failure, but the tires are as close to flat-proof as I've found.

debade 03-29-21 03:47 AM

My wife and I only use them on our touring bikes but 32s. Thousands of miles on both bikes and can only recall one flat on each bike. Her’s was on an older tire and a somewhat typical flat but can’t remember what it was. Mine was while doing a day ride during a tour and a piece of metal lodged perpendicular to the rim piercing the tire on both sides. I never saw the road debris and if I was not on the bike when it happened, I would have suspected the tire was vandalized. I tell this story because this flat was so unique and unlikely to happen again.

My story about Schwalbes is typical among touring cyclists. I see no reason 25s would be different but that would be my only question about them. And if you can’t find more information about that size being more prone to flats, I would buy them and the wine at the same time.

timdow 03-29-21 08:22 AM

The 25c's are extremely difficult to mount. I used a coupe of "C" clamps to hold the tire on the rim while I finished mounting it. I have been using larger sizes of Marathon Plus on other bikes, and only one sidewall flat. Like you, I am hoping that I don't have to repair a puncture along the road. If so, maybe the tire will be more compliant after using it for a time(?) Wishful thinking there I guess. Even with the flat I got (construction staple that went into the tread that didn't puncture, then the other end of the staple went into the sidewall), I didn't even know until the next morning.

noglider 04-01-21 01:32 PM

Buy a Kool Stop Tire Jack and carry it with you. It makes a difficult job fairly easy. There are similar competing tools, too.

AstroEng 04-02-21 02:35 PM


Originally Posted by PaulH (Post 21988830)
Pre-Covid, I was driving and biking about the same distance per year and getting about the same result between flats on both -- around 15,000-20,000 miles. I think you will be raising a glass.

15,000 miles?! Wow... I only get about 3000 before I get a crack in the rubber that allows some small piece of glass or something through and gives me a flat.

My experience has been that they stay hard to put on for the life of the tire.

Welshboy 06-03-21 01:00 AM

Just a little post script. I hesitated on using my new Schwalbe Marathon Plus 25C's until I had another rear wheel puncture on my existing Vittoria Zaffiro tyres so I've only just started using them. A very harsh ride!

sweeks 06-05-21 07:23 AM


Originally Posted by Welshboy (Post 22086012)
A very harsh ride!

Reassess tire pressure?
I have Marathon Plus (406-35) on my commuter bike and Marathon Supreme (700x32) on my road bike. On both bikes, I've been going to lower and lower tire pressure (maybe 30% below max) and have found improvements in ride quality without increased rolling resistance.

Welshboy 06-05-21 11:07 AM


Originally Posted by sweeks (Post 22089052)
Reassess tire pressure?
I have Marathon Plus (406-35) on my commuter bike and Marathon Supreme (700x32) on my road bike. On both bikes, I've been going to lower and lower tire pressure (maybe 30% below max) and have found improvements in ride quality without increased rolling resistance.

Worth a shot. I'll check out the figures on the sidewall and go LOW.

fooferdoggie 06-05-21 11:26 AM

they do stretch. I got new rims put the month old tire o the front not hard but the new tire on the back was a real bear. these are 38's but I still struggled to get it on. but they are pretty flat resistant. but Have gotten flats from big nails and a couple small pieces of wire. once just rolling my bike through my woodworking shop got a small piece of wire in it. I got 8000 miles on the front. I goofed the black up so I don't know the milage I will get on that,

Darth Lefty 06-14-21 01:25 PM

The problem with lower pressure in the 25c Marathon Plus is there was never really very much air in there to begin with

rumrunn6 06-21-21 12:03 PM


Originally Posted by timdow (Post 21989997)
I used a coupe of "C" clamps to hold the tire on the rim while I finished mounting it.

interesting. since I read about it on the forums I use toe clip straps & a tire jack. or in this case 2 toe clip straps & a velcro strap. my winter marathons are pretty tough
https://cimg1.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...3eacacf80b.jpg
this other thing is called a "speedier lever" & does provide some features & benefits that customary levers do not. it gets used pretty much for all tire changes
https://cimg0.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...cdc3eded06.jpg
my tire jack only works on narrow tires, perfect for 25mm tires

https://cimg3.ibsrv.net/gimg/bikefor...0ae35b553c.jpg
also, always pinch them & make sure they are well into the wheel channel, giving you more slack on the opposite side

Welshboy 08-04-21 06:05 AM

OK. I'm getting to like them and whilst they are still heavy and a bit harsh riding I do kind of feel invincible when riding through the unavoidable glass on the cycle path that runs parallel to the main highway where I'm guessing that drivers toss glass bottles over onto the cycle path.

I did puncture on my 'fender free' road bike that I use for sunny day commutes so I might get Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres for that bike but in the 28C size.

Almost a fan.

GhenghisKahn 11-13-21 08:00 AM

"I did puncture on my 'fender free' road bike that I use for sunny day commutes so I might get Schwalbe Marathon Plus tyres for that bike but in the 28C size. Almost a fan."

Going to 28mm is a good move provided you have the clearance. 32mm would be even better. Been using SMPs on all my commuter, utility and touring bikes for over 20 years. Probably 125,000 miles+ including 3 lengthy tours. 3 flats. When you realize you haven't flatted in 8 months you'll be a fan.

Welshboy 11-30-21 04:43 PM

Had my first puncture after 875 miles commuting on some pretty crappy glass strewn bike paths. Incredibly I was about 250 yards from work so no dramas. No bicycle tyre could have withstood the chunky spike of glass that caused me to puncture. Unfortunately, 875 miles has NOT softened them up at all and getting the tyre off to change the tube was hard work and would have been a nightmare at the side of the road with cold hands.

GhenghisKahn 12-04-21 05:16 PM


Originally Posted by Welshboy (Post 22324890)
Had my first puncture after 875 miles commuting on some pretty crappy glass strewn bike paths. Incredibly I was about 250 yards from work so no dramas. No bicycle tyre could have withstood the chunky spike of glass that caused me to puncture. Unfortunately, 875 miles has NOT softened them up at all and getting the tyre off to change the tube was hard work and would have been a nightmare at the side of the road with cold hands.

In your case you may want to try airless. They will definitely slow one down, but what I liked was the harder work it was to traverse the same distance and terrain as with pneumatic. Never used them for commuting, though. Dont even know if they're still being made. My use of them dates back to 2007-2009.

Well, they're still being made apparently:

http://www.bikeroar.com/articles/tannus-airless-solid-tire-review-aither-1-dot-1-road

PaulH 12-05-21 09:18 AM

I use Mr. Tuffy liners with my Marathon Plus. This essentially eliminates flats.

Darth Lefty 12-05-21 12:20 PM

The latex layer is the clever part of Marathon GG and Plus tires, and what keeps them from being terrible. It provides more depth for anything to puncture through, but it gives back more energy than butyl rubber like the tread or casing. Conti has a similar tire. The larger Plus tires are really, really thick. 9mm. The latex layer is 5mm thick and there's the tread on top of that and the casing under it. I wonder if the 25's are as thick. I've joked before there wouldn't be any room for air inside... Schwalbe also has a cheaper tire that's their base compound all the way through and just as thick, but I don't think anyone is buying it. It must be a real pig.

Surely also small high pressure tires are in more danger from road hazards anyhow. Same weight on smaller contact patch = more pressure to push in road hazards

ThermionicScott 12-06-21 04:45 PM


Originally Posted by Darth Lefty (Post 22329612)
Surely also small high pressure tires are in more danger from road hazards anyhow. Same weight on smaller contact patch = more pressure to push in road hazards

That's the only way I can explain my good "luck" on wider (38-42mm), low-pressure tires that have no special flat protection whatsoever. It seems like there are more and more patches of broken glass between my house and work (or the local watering holes), and I don't always see them before I hear that sickening "kssht-kshht" sound. :twitchy: But it might as well be sand for the way it sticks for another revolution or two, then gets brushed off again.

I also suspect -- without evidence to back it up ;) -- that this is part of why "road tubeless" users happily report fewer flats. Yes, sealant does a great job of plugging holes in the casing, but roadies have also moved up from 23mm tires to 25, 28, even 32mm in a lot of cases, and dropped their tire pressures accordingly.

parkbrav 01-08-22 05:02 PM

I just wanted to introduce myself. I am a 12 month cyclist up here in Boston until I make that down payment on a car.

anyway, I just installed the winter tires. And I'm bargain hunting on new summer tires. And I'm considering Schwalbe Marathon for my next tire.

So I just wanted to say thanks for the testimonials. You just made a sale (or two!) :)


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