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Only 1 chainstay and seatstay

Old 05-19-21, 07:37 PM
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seibaatgung
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Only 1 chainstay and seatstay

Are there any bikes with a chainstay and seatstay only on the side of the drivetrain? That would be great for putting in a new tube while commuting - same with a lefty fork.
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Old 05-19-21, 09:51 PM
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I believe Rob English made a few, but it'll probably cost you an arm and a leg for that custom frame and wheelset(which, by his reputation, may be worth your arm and leg...). Not sure if it's worth it just to change tubes though. Certainly looks unique, and could probably be built very stiff when using the right tube diameters, which I'm sure Rob went through the troubles to make sure it's correct.

If you have a friend with a brazing torch and a few weekends, you could probably make a similar frame for $300, but you'd have to figure out where to source the rear hub, or how to machine one yourself. If you're okay with a lefty front and a righty rear, you could get a lefty hub for the front, but I don't know of any righty rear hubs.
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Old 05-19-21, 10:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Parkyy16 View Post
I believe Rob English made a few, but it'll probably cost you an arm and a leg for that custom frame and wheelset(which, by his reputation, may be worth your arm and leg...). Not sure if it's worth it just to change tubes though. Certainly looks unique, and could probably be built very stiff when using the right tube diameters, which I'm sure Rob went through the troubles to make sure it's correct.

If you have a friend with a brazing torch and a few weekends, you could probably make a similar frame for $300, but you'd have to figure out where to source the rear hub, or how to machine one yourself. If you're okay with a lefty front and a righty rear, you could get a lefty hub for the front, but I don't know of any righty rear hubs.
I don't see the cost for a right-only back end on the pricelist. It looks like the complete bike would cost on par with a Quattrovelo at €8950=$10,904 at which point it makes more sense to buy the vehicle that's mass-produced and thoroughly-tested.
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Old 05-19-21, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
I don't see the cost for a right-only back end on the pricelist. It looks like the complete bike would cost on par with a Quattrovelo at €8950=$10,904 at which point it makes more sense to buy the vehicle that's mass-produced and thoroughly-tested.
There are some people that would buy a $10k bike from a custom builder. I didn't pay that much for my Breadwinner, but it's certainly the most expensive thing I've ever bought for myself. Either case, it's probably not worth the money to get a righty rear end for ease of tire/tube changes. You'd still have to mess with the drive train to take the wheel off anyways, since you have to clear the chain off of the cogs in order to be able to pull the wheel off.
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Old 05-20-21, 12:48 AM
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Originally Posted by Parkyy16 View Post
There are some people that would buy a $10k bike from a custom builder. I didn't pay that much for my Breadwinner, but it's certainly the most expensive thing I've ever bought for myself
Picture?
Originally Posted by Parkyy16 View Post
it's probably not worth the money to get a righty rear end for ease of tire/tube changes.
I doubt you would rack up thousands in cab fare for the occasional flat.
Originally Posted by Parkyy16 View Post
You'd still have to mess with the drive train to take the wheel off anyways, since you have to clear the chain off of the cogs in order to be able to pull the wheel off.
How often do you change the wheel?
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Old 05-20-21, 09:37 AM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
Are there any bikes with a chainstay and seatstay only on the side of the drivetrain? That would be great for putting in a new tube while commuting - same with a lefty fork.
Last time I checked, open-ended tubes were still available.
They’re not horrible to ride and a lot less expensive.
edit:
Here are some:https://gaadi.de/?page_id=3671&lang=en
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Old 05-20-21, 11:05 AM
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Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Last time I checked, open-ended tubes were still available.
They’re not horrible to ride and a lot less expensive.
edit:
Here are some:https://gaadi.de/?page_id=3671&lang=en
Putting one in would still require me to take out my tubeless liner?
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Old 05-21-21, 02:36 PM
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What imagined problem are you trying to solve here? In a tubeless set up, most flats can be repaired just by remembering to add some more sealant, because you forgot, and it went flat without it... Or in the case of a bigger puncture, a plug. In order to need a tube replacement, your tire and/or rim is going to have significant damage and it’s probably also going to need a boot. How often does that happen? And you want to compromise the rear end stiffness in pedaling and braking for the entire lifetime of the bicycle for that one potential situation?

if you look at motorcycles that have single-sided swingarm, they usually have a driveshaft running through the arm. The brake is on the left side like a bicycle but there’s no chain on the right. They also have an in-line crankshaft and transmission to work with the drive shaft to the rear end. Shaft drives have been tried on bicycles but they are hardly common. Pedals are a transverse system and work nicely with a chain drive.

Last edited by Darth Lefty; 05-21-21 at 02:41 PM.
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Old 05-21-21, 03:54 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
What imagined problem are you trying to solve here? In a tubeless set up, most flats can be repaired just by remembering to add some more sealant, because you forgot, and it went flat without it... Or in the case of a bigger puncture, a plug. In order to need a tube replacement, your tire and/or rim is going to have significant damage and it’s probably also going to need a boot. How often does that happen?
In case the hole is too large for the plug to repair. Probably not very common. What is a boot?
Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
And you want to compromise the rear end stiffness in pedaling and braking for the entire lifetime of the bicycle for that one potential situation?
Probably not - it's just a subject of interest to me.

Last edited by seibaatgung; 05-21-21 at 03:58 PM.
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Old 05-21-21, 05:16 PM
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An interior tire patch. Park TB-2 just for an example
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Old 05-21-21, 05:19 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
An interior tire patch. Park TB-2 just for an example
Why not use a patch for a tubeless-compatible tire or a tube itself instead of a tubeless-incompatible patch?
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Old 05-23-21, 09:17 AM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
Are there any bikes with a chainstay and seatstay only on the side of the drivetrain? That would be great for putting in a new tube while commuting - same with a lefty fork.
My Giant Halfway folding bike has exactly that. Also, the front fork is one-legged.


Last edited by Inisfallen; 05-23-21 at 09:20 AM. Reason: Added a picture
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Old 05-23-21, 02:40 PM
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Originally Posted by Inisfallen View Post
My Giant Halfway folding bike has exactly that. Also, the front fork is one-legged.

That's definitely the cheapest option for someone unwilling to try a two-ended tube. Not a fan of rim brakes though.
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Old 05-23-21, 04:17 PM
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You can see how the brake bridge on that bike lines up with the fold so it misses the top tube. It must fold down tight. Pretty clever!

Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
That's definitely the cheapest option for someone unwilling to try a two-ended tube. Not a fan of rim brakes though.
But in bikes, (nearly all) hub brakes all react on the left because (nearly all) drivetrains area on the right. So it's what you are going to be stuck with.
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Old 05-23-21, 05:04 PM
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Originally Posted by Darth Lefty View Post
You can see how the brake bridge on that bike lines up with the fold so it misses the top tube. It must fold down tight. Pretty clever!


But in bikes, (nearly all) hub brakes all react on the left because (nearly all) drivetrains area on the right. So it's what you are going to be stuck with.
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Old 05-23-21, 05:29 PM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
Are there any bikes with a chainstay and seatstay only on the side of the drivetrain? That would be great for putting in a new tube while commuting - same with a lefty fork.
It would be, but I think it's possible to overestimate the difficulty of patching a tube while it's still on the rim. It's pretty easy to find the spot where the puncture is (often whatever caused the puncture will be stuck in the tire), lever that portion of the tire off the rim, on one side of the rim, pull that section of tube out, patch it, and put it and the tire back on the rim. It can be faster than removing the wheel, then the tire, then replacing the tube.

Originally Posted by dabac View Post
Last time I checked, open-ended tubes were still available.
They’re not horrible to ride and a lot less expensive.
edit:
Here are some:https://gaadi.de/?page_id=3671&lang=en
That's actually pretty clever, but kind of a solution in search of a problem, given the ease of patching a tube.
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Old 05-23-21, 06:24 PM
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Where I am in S E Asia, it is normal to patch bicycle and motorbike tubes without removing the wheel. The tube remains inside the frame.
so it can be done. I don't like it, so I carry a spanner to remove the wheel.

I also like to minimize flat tires. I run tubeless sealant in tubes. You can't predict when you will get a flat tire. But I get approximately one small puncture per month which seals with the sealant, and one large puncture per year which is too big to seal with the sealant. Getting one flat tire per year, is not too bad, unless I come up with something even better.

The challenge with tubeless sealant in tubes is, sealant can leak out when applying the patch, and prevent it from sticking. So you need to squeeze out as much as possible from near the area to be patched before beginning. Of course you hold it up, so most of the sealant remains at the bottom.
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Old 05-23-21, 06:34 PM
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Originally Posted by Inisfallen View Post
That's actually pretty clever, but kind of a solution in search of a problem, given the ease of patching a tube.
If you're commuting with a tubeless setup and you get a flat, a 2-ended tube can be inserted without taking the tire off the wheel. If you patch the tire you would need an air compressor or cartridge to re-seat the bead. An air compressor is too large to carry for this purpose, and air cartridges aren't rechargeable.
Originally Posted by alo View Post
I also like to minimize flat tires. I run tubeless sealant in tubes. You can't predict when you will get a flat tire. But I get approximately one small puncture per month which seals with the sealant, and one large puncture per year which is too big to seal with the sealant. Getting one flat tire per year, is not too bad, unless I come up with something even better.
How do you deal with the large punctures?
Originally Posted by alo View Post
Where I am in S E Asia, it is normal to patch bicycle and motorbike tubes without removing the wheel. The tube remains inside the frame.
so it can be done.
How is that done?

Last edited by seibaatgung; 05-23-21 at 07:01 PM.
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Old 05-23-21, 07:14 PM
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Dave Levy of TiCycles has built a couple of righty one-siders. At least one was belt drive and I recall was intended as a commuter. They looked like well thought out bikes. I never asked the price. I know he is not cheap. (He's built me 2 frames. 4 stems and 2 seatposts. The guy I'd go to for an unusual project.)
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Old 05-24-21, 07:18 AM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
If you're commuting with a tubeless setup and you get a flat, a 2-ended tube can be inserted without taking the tire off the wheel. If you patch the tire you would need an air compressor or cartridge to re-seat the bead. An air compressor is too large to carry for this purpose, and air cartridges aren't rechargeable.

How do you deal with the large punctures?

How is that done?
See my post above. It's pretty easy to figure out where the puncture is. Then lever the tire off the rim, just one one side, over maybe just six inches or so of the circumference of the rim. Pull out the tube, just in that six-inch section, and patch the puncture.

I've done it plenty of times.
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Old 05-24-21, 07:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Inisfallen View Post
See my post above. It's pretty easy to figure out where the puncture is. Then lever the tire off the rim, just one one side, over maybe just six inches or so of the circumference of the rim. Pull out the tube, just in that six-inch section, and patch the puncture.

I've done it plenty of times.
Does a tube patch work equally well on a tire?
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Old 05-24-21, 08:00 AM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
Does a tube patch work equally well on a tire?
No. Although I'm not quite sure what you mean. For your run-of-the-mill puncture, there's no need to patch the tire. Just remove whatever caused the puncture, if it's still stuck in the tire. And most patch kits come with a "boot," which is a temporary repair that will (hopefully) get you home if your tire is really torn, or has a huge hole it it. But it's a temporary fix. A tire that badly damaged will have to be replaced.
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Old 05-24-21, 08:27 AM
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Originally Posted by Inisfallen View Post
No. Although I'm not quite sure what you mean. For your run-of-the-mill puncture, there's no need to patch the tire. Just remove whatever caused the puncture, if it's still stuck in the tire. And most patch kits come with a "boot," which is a temporary repair that will (hopefully) get you home if your tire is really torn, or has a huge hole it it. But it's a temporary fix. A tire that badly damaged will have to be replaced.
I'm tubeless. I'm familiar with plugs but if that's not enough how should I patch it?
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Old 05-24-21, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
I'm tubeless. I'm familiar with plugs but if that's not enough how should I patch it?
OK, I see.

I'm sorry, I don't know anything about tubeless bike tires. I've never had a bike with tubeless tires/rims, and probably never will. I've got nothing against them, I just have no experience at all with tubeless tires for bicycles.
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Old 05-24-21, 06:32 PM
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Originally Posted by seibaatgung View Post
How do you deal with the large punctures?

How is that done?
Large punctures need to be patched.

It is normally a lot less messy if you have sealant in a tube, compared to having sealant in a tubeless tire.

Where I am in S E Asia, they just remove the bead from one side of the tire, and remove the tube, while it is still on the bike. The tube still passes through the frame. I don't like it. I remove the wheel.
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