Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

How to get faster

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

How to get faster

Old 06-25-22, 09:03 AM
  #26  
koala logs
Banned.
 
Join Date: May 2022
Posts: 674
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 347 Post(s)
Liked 166 Times in 136 Posts
Originally Posted by poeli View Post
its 65% rural roads on which I can ride fast, and then 35% city with traffic lights yes. Guess id have to train to get faster to my cruising speed again.
In this case, you can definitely save time by riding faster on rural roads. On city roads, keep it easy so you'll have fresh legs when you hit the open roads where speed matters more.

Indeed, training and in addition, fueling and hydration. The faster you ride, the more you need to eat and drink to aid recovery and get to your destination / work feeling fresh and energized as opposed to feeling worn down and fatigued - not a good thing if you have to work.
koala logs is offline  
Old 06-25-22, 10:38 AM
  #27  
Sardines
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Posts: 259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 54 Times in 47 Posts
A 40 to 44t chain will gain you a couple of km/h at the top end, and you're still have 28+" of gearing, so you should be good in terms of climbing ability. A XL saddlebag in lieu of panniers does help a lot with aero. I did that for a while, but then I moved to bigger laptops and even trunk bags couldn't fit it.
Also switching from a wide tire, say durable 40mm to a fast 32mm, will help with aero and rolling resistance as well. And improving aero at over 20+km/h will help with speed. So in combination, you may just get significant minutes of time on the flats, with the same effort.
That is the one thing I miss about COV19... traffic was lighter when people stayed home! haha
Sardines is offline  
Likes For Sardines:
Old 06-29-22, 02:01 AM
  #28  
Leisesturm
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 5,199
Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1967 Post(s)
Liked 427 Times in 306 Posts
Originally Posted by kenneth001 View Post
U know to get faster I usually bend my back down to the handlebars of the bike
Even better ... drop bars! If the o.p. bike is flat-bar a drop bar setup WILL shave some minutes. It's all about the aero. Savvy bike commuters are ditching backpacks and going to panniers and are much happier. I just spent a lot of money on a specialist pannier for business attire so my wife doesn't have to wear the 40L backpack she used to stuff with clothes, laptop, and etc. FWIW.
Leisesturm is offline  
Old 06-30-22, 01:37 PM
  #29  
Badger6
Obsessed with Eddington
 
Badger6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Brussels (BE) 🇧🇪
Posts: 1,310

Bikes: '16 Spesh Diverge, '14 Spesh Fatboy, '18 Spesh Epic, '18 Spesh SL6, '21 Spesh SL7, '21 Spesh Diverge...and maybe n+1?

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 520 Post(s)
Liked 596 Times in 361 Posts
Originally Posted by poeli View Post
its 65% rural roads on which I can ride fast, and then 35% city with traffic lights yes. Guess id have to train to get faster to my cruising speed again.
I live outside of Brussels and commute into the city for work. So, I can relate to everything you’ve said about riding in the city. I wonder what exactly is the route you use through the city. Do you have the option of using some of the protected bike lanes or designated bike routes? I’ve found that some routings through the city are very fast, while others are horribly slow. I tend to ride mostly on the eastern and southern side of the city, and avoid the center at all costs…unless filling in streets on Wandrer.earth.

Also, for commuting, not sure what tire you’re on, but the Specialized Roubaix 30/32 (if you can find it in Belgium) is excellent. Rolls fast, and is very durable. I run mine tubeless, and I’ve had exactly one flat in 2 years here. And one other in the previous 4 years using those tires.
Badger6 is offline  
Old 07-01-22, 09:36 AM
  #30  
Sardines
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Posts: 259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 54 Times in 47 Posts
My recollections of Belgian roads are mostly riding out of the cities en route to the next country. What sort of flats are you guys getting? Punctures and/or cuts from sharp debris, sidewall damage or pinch flats from too many potholes? Going tubeless will usually take care of punctures and especially pinch flats, and you save a little weight and rolling resistance. The other damage you will have to get a much tougher tire, which can affect rolling resistance and aero.
Funnily I've been experimenting with Google Maps bicycling routes and my own devised routes. Google is great at telling me where traffic is, and I am willing to be annoying and ride on curbs (kerbs for you UKers) to wind round traffic if unavoidable.
poeli , I would first try get a baseline time for the commute, averaged over a week, then install the chain ring upgrade to see if there is an improvement over a week. Once you get a new baseline with the chainring, then try the tires,etc. Basically try to upgrade one element at a time so you know which one has the biggest gain, and which one is negligible. Also grade on comfort, for eg, the backpack vs panniers/saddlebag, or the tire pressures vs speed gains. Took me awhile to figure out but I found a custom padded bag with uniklip attachment, helped me the most aerodynamically, as did the faster GP5kSTR tires. Thanks to you I am also looking at testing a pair of GP5kTL to see if there's a difference, cos those tires are 30% cheaper, and being at EOML, will be easier to stock up.
Sardines is offline  
Likes For Sardines:
Old 07-25-22, 10:30 AM
  #31  
Sardines
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Posts: 259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 54 Times in 47 Posts
Originally Posted by poeli View Post
I ordered a 44t chainring instead of a 40t to test if there will be differences.
the casette is still 11-42t.
I know I won't cut my time by 20 minutes, but small improvements combined should give me some minutes (but no way double digits).
thanks for your post!
So how did it go?
Sardines is offline  
Old 07-25-22, 12:58 PM
  #32  
poeli
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Sardines View Post
So how did it go?
I wish I could say I tedted it already. Installed it but then lying wheel bearings gave out and did my bike to my local bike shop. Fixed and continued. Then my derailleur was broken, back to the bike shop where its been for 2 weeks already (almost 3). Holidays now so I will certainly give them a call when i can pick up my ride (and finally test!!)
poeli is offline  
Old 07-26-22, 01:34 PM
  #33  
Sardines
Full Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2021
Posts: 259
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 102 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 54 Times in 47 Posts
Yikes, sorry to hear that. But yeah that's the problem with derailleur systems, it's a chain of things to break down. With Pinion and Gates belt, I only worry about oil change every year, and belt health. It's a dream to maintain. But 3 weeks to change a derailleur? Is it that busy in the summer?
Sardines is offline  
Old 07-27-22, 01:04 PM
  #34  
poeli
Newbie
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2016
Posts: 19
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by Sardines View Post
Yikes, sorry to hear that. But yeah that's the problem with derailleur systems, it's a chain of things to break down. With Pinion and Gates belt, I only worry about oil change every year, and belt health. It's a dream to maintain. But 3 weeks to change a derailleur? Is it that busy in the summer?
spare parts are difficult to get apparently. But still. I want my ride so I can test!
poeli is offline  
Old 08-04-22, 09:18 AM
  #35  
beng1
Full Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 329
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 367 Post(s)
Liked 161 Times in 80 Posts
Leave earlier in the morning for work, then you can get to work on time easy and without stress, works on a bike or if driving an automobile.
beng1 is offline  
Old 08-04-22, 07:58 PM
  #36  
Ridinglurker
Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2021
Posts: 45
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 30 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
I'm impressed with your ride. My commute is 9km and I don't get over 20 kmh on average. 5 traffic lights ruin all gains.

If you have flexible work hours, try finding a better time to have less traffic. Not only is it faster, but also safer.

Don't use a backpack! Consider a frame triangle bag. That is aero and lower center of gravity. Maybe a bag on rear rack would not as much drag ad panniers.

On rough roads wider tires and rims may actually be better since you lose less energy moving up and down. Get really expensive tires for less rolling resistance. Consider tubeless to avoid flats. Obviously a flat ruins all time gains. I have Schwalbe Allmotion touring tires. Very robust and so smooth rolling at 2.15".

Tight clothing and good seating positions. But there is a tradeoff between power, aero and comfort. Don't sacrifice comfort for speed.
Ridinglurker is offline  
Old 08-05-22, 09:40 AM
  #37  
jakez
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2022
Posts: 11
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 1 Post
Originally Posted by stargazecyclist View Post
aerodynamic fairing
:d:d:d
jakez is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.