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Show me your milk crates!

Old 05-10-23, 05:49 PM
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Commuter item suggestions

Any suggestions for items to carry on my bike for next week? It's called the Commuter Challenge and you're supposed to try to represent your profession. One guy carried big law depositions, I'm thinking of carrying my yoga mat on my bike, though that's just a hobby these days. I advise grad students these days in Engineering. I have to add a brick because of how much money I raised, also carry my laptop and other heavy commuter items like metal coffee mug, and I have to somehow add a loaded pannier also though I can choose to stuff with newspaper. I'll be dealing with uneven cobblestones going up and downhill so I need sturdy attachments. I do have more bungee cords and rope also.

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Old 05-10-23, 05:50 PM
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Show me your milk crates!

Hi all, I enjoy mine but I recently saw another bike project volunteer with a longer milk crate. I'm curious what anyone else's set up is. He used a cargo net with bungee hooks. I do have a cargo net but have not been in the habit of using it... yet.
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Old 05-11-23, 06:18 AM
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My milk crate brings all the boys to the yard.

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Old 05-11-23, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by jaxy357
Hi all, I enjoy mine but I recently saw another bike project volunteer with a longer milk crate. I'm curious what anyone else's set up is.
The strength/sturdiness of the rear carrier is the limiting factor for carrying stuff in a basket, IMO. Imaginative use of bungee cords and zip ties can make up for deficiencies in basket dimensions or attachments.






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Old 05-12-23, 01:19 PM
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That is one cargo-holding machine!!
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Old 05-14-23, 08:44 AM
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So I'm not the only one who puts a milk crate on a bicycle. Where do you guys get your crates and what brands? I got mine attached by pipe fittings so I can take it off and on at will. Thinking about getting a longer milk crate, but where to buy?
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Old 05-14-23, 09:45 AM
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Mine I got by posting on my local buy nothing group on Facebook and it was from a dairy farm. My friend's longer one was from a mushroom farm.
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Old 05-14-23, 09:49 AM
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Pic from today's ride through the greenways and a practice ride for Friday.
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Old 05-18-23, 12:47 AM
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Old 05-18-23, 03:35 AM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
The strength/sturdiness of the rear carrier is the limiting factor for carrying stuff in a basket, IMO. Imaginative use of bungee cords and zip ties can make up for deficiencies in basket dimensions or attachments.
That’s my experience as well.


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Old 05-18-23, 03:43 AM
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Originally Posted by whm1974
So I'm not the only one who puts a milk crate on a bicycle. Where do you guys get your crates and what brands? I got mine attached by pipe fittings so I can take it off and on at will. Thinking about getting a longer milk crate, but where to buy?
I'm curious about the pipe fittings if you have a pic. I'm using bungees currently because I was told some flexion is good but I think I have too much back and forth motion while riding. not exactly aerodynamic and a little tricky getting on and off the train, etc. I forgot to mention the Container Store if you have one near you can be full of options for milk crates.
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Old 05-18-23, 06:15 AM
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Originally Posted by jaxy357
I'm curious about the pipe fittings if you have a pic. I'm using bungees currently because I was told some flexion is good but I think I have too much back and forth motion while riding. not exactly aerodynamic and a little tricky getting on and off the train, etc. I forgot to mention the Container Store if you have one near you can be full of options for milk crates.
When I use a milk crate I use three-inch wide velcro straps to hold it down. Originally I used a velcro fishing rods holder from an outdoor adventure shop.

20 year ago I bought Wald Folding Baskets for the rear of the one bike I had back then. They are perfect. They fold up out of the way, but are there when I need them. There are less expensive ones out there that may work also.

I realize you mentioned a milk crate challenge, but there are other options.

Two years ago when I bought a 20-inch folding bike I bought a taller, more stylish basket from Wal-Mart and use bungees, but they are not as secure as the velcro.
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Old 05-18-23, 06:39 AM
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I like the idea of velcro and think I have some in my sewing room, thank you!
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Old 05-18-23, 01:56 PM
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Originally Posted by jaxy357
I like the idea of velcro and think I have some in my sewing room, thank you!
I wouldn't trust Velcro from your sewing room for securing a basket to a bicycle rack if anything heavier than a change of clothes and/or your lunch was the cargo.
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Old 05-18-23, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
I wouldn't trust Velcro from your sewing room for securing a basket to a bicycle rack if anything heavier than a change of clothes and/or your lunch was the cargo.
I decided against the velcro for attachment, will double up the bungees and maybe add some zip ties, too. Went to the hardware store and grabbed some new bolts and nuts for the existing rack that the milk crate attaches to...didn't realize i was missing one and the other one wouldn't have lasted long...
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Old 05-20-23, 04:13 AM
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Isn't against the Law (In some states.) to have a milk crate on your bike as most of them are stolen?
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Old 05-20-23, 08:23 AM
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Originally Posted by Colorado Kid
Isn't against the Law (In some states.) to have a milk crate on your bike as most of them are stolen?
"Milk Crate" is a generic term used for the type of storage container configuration that often has been used by various dairies for their products. These type of containers are sold in many establishments, without any dairy company's logo. All quite legal.
Home Depot Milk Crates For Sale
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Old 05-20-23, 09:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Colorado Kid
Isn't against the Law (In some states.) to have a milk crate on your bike as most of them are stolen?
Pretty much every milk crate I have has some form of indication that it is the property of the dairy and not for private possession. Thus I am not admitting to having 30 or so,
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Old 05-20-23, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by Colorado Kid
Isn't against the Law (In some states.) to have a milk crate on your bike as most of them are stolen?
There is no law against riding a bicycle even if in some areas a good number of the bicycles may be stolen.
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Old 05-20-23, 03:15 PM
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All my milk crates are busy off the bikes holding water jugs, so I'm sort of left out of this thread. But my Chicago-forged Schwinn cruiser showcases the fine products of Maysville, Kentucky:
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Old 05-20-23, 04:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Colorado Kid
Isn't against the Law (In some states.) to have a milk crate on your bike as most of them are stolen?
It's Ok. You committed three felonies today and didn't even know it.

Daily rider year round...


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Old 05-20-23, 05:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Colorado Kid
Isn't against the Law (In some states.) to have a milk crate on your bike as most of them are stolen?
The bright yellow milk crate bolted on my 2001 Trek 7200 has a date code of 11-74. It came from my grandfather's store after he died in the mid 80s. The dairy went out of business in 1989 (presumably not from milk crate theft losses), so I think I'm OK.

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Old 05-21-23, 09:32 AM
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Originally Posted by ralphs
The bright yellow milk crate bolted on my 2001 Trek 7200 has a date code of 11-74. It came from my grandfather's store after he died in the mid 80s. The dairy went out of business in 1989 (presumably not from milk crate theft losses), so I think I'm OK.
I bought these unmarked "milk crates" at a garage sale for 50¢ each about 10 years ago. These 3 are in my garage, others are in various closets holding stuff.


I prefer to use purpose built bicycle baskets on my bike. The baskets on all my bikes are all at least 20 years old and were inexpensive when bought while living in Germany and still serve their purpose quite well.

Over 40 years ago I mounted a borrowed milk crate on my commuter bike for awhile.

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Old 05-21-23, 09:07 PM
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
The strength/sturdiness of the rear carrier is the limiting factor for carrying stuff in a basket, IMO. Imaginative use of bungee cords and zip ties can make up for deficiencies in basket dimensions or attachments.






Hey you dont have enough reflectors, you need more

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Old 05-22-23, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Eds0123
Hey you dont have enough reflectors, you need more
When commuting in hours of darkness on busy 4 lane 55mph roads, a bicyclist can never have too many lights or reflectors. Sturdy baskets are also useful for mounting elevated lights so they can be seen by more than the first vehicle in a line of vehicles approaching from rear at high speed.




Bottom photo was taken with flash, note how well the reflectors (the bottom three red objects return the light to the source.

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