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Phosphorescent gear numbers

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Phosphorescent gear numbers

Old 11-16-05, 09:20 PM
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Scott176
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Phosphorescent gear numbers

Hi All.
I'm a newbie to bike commuting and when i cycle back home from the office it's usually at night. Not being used to the 24 shift gearing system i tend to depend on reading the numbers on the gear shifters - i threw a chain twice, due to 'cross-chaining' (is that the right term?), before getting the hang of things. However at night it's very difficult to see the gear numbers. Does anyone know of a 'glow-in-the-dark' gear-numbers gearing system? Not that i'd change over now, but when i'm considering my next bike it would be a nice feature to have.
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Old 11-16-05, 10:24 PM
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Throwing the chain is a derailuer adjustment issue.
Shift when you need to and don't worry about what gear you're in. Get used to it. It really is that simple.
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Old 11-16-05, 10:31 PM
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Is good form to look at how many pedal-revolutions per minute are you doing rather than to look at what gear your bike is at. Stay in the middle, smaller chainring and go by feel.
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Old 11-16-05, 11:05 PM
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Just try to keep in mind where you're at. And occasionally look down to reaffirm.
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Old 11-16-05, 11:07 PM
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I use barcons, and there are no reference numbers. Heck, the front derailleur isn't even indexed. I just shift when I need to, up or down. I don't care what number the gear is.
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Old 11-16-05, 11:28 PM
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I don't thing I've ever used the granny gear on my bike. I just shift the gears on the right and only use the shifter on the left when I'm climbing big hills and wanna be a wuss about it. Just pedal comfortable and don't bother w/ looking at your gears too much except to see if you're getting stronger.
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Old 11-16-05, 11:33 PM
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I could see cross-chaining being an issue if your chain is on the small chainring on the cranks and you shift out to the small cogs in the rear as well. That's not a good situation, because it generates maximum chain slack, and simultaneously puts the chain under very high load while running it on a rear cog with very few teeth engaged.

Solution: do not use the small chainring on the crank routinely. Use it when climbing steep hills if you have to, and then make a point of shifting the chain back to the middle chainring as soon as practical when the hill has been conquered. Chainrings with more teeth wear slower too, other factors being equal.

If you still would like to be able to see the gear indicators in darkness, one option would be a small LED light designed to illuminate the display of a bicycle computer. Check out the one at the bottom-right on this page, for example. Some adaptation would be required. Or just buy/adapt a helmet light that points where you look
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Old 11-17-05, 12:03 AM
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Originally Posted by CastIron
Shift when you need to and don't worry about what gear you're in. Get used to it. It really is that simple.
Avoiding the Big-Big and Small-Small combinations to be sure.
Cross chaining occurs when the gears are used that place the chain on the inside sprocket (1) in the front and the outside sprocket (8) in the back or conversely on the outside (3) in front and the inside (1) in back. This puts the chain at an extreme angle which causes excessive chain and sprocket wear and also causes less than the smoothest shifting. While these 2 extreme angle gears are part of your set of 24 and can be used , there are other gears among the 24 that either duplicate or come close to duplicating these gears. Recommendation: unless you are "just passing through" as in preparing for a steep hill or recovering from a steep climb, stay away from the 1-8 and the 3-1 combinations of gears.

As for glow in the dark indicators I painted out the windows on my commuter's Deore shifter pods, so there'd be no sale for me.
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Old 11-17-05, 09:21 AM
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Scott176 -- I can sympathsize completely with the whole gearing issue. This is my first serious winter of commuting and it has been an adjustment for me. I use a combination of Slvoid's keep track of where you are in the gearing approach and the more casual just shift until it feels comfortable. Since I have a bike computer that lights up I will periodically check that to make sure I am keeping the speed I usually maintain on a given section of my ride. The biggest thing is to shift until you can ride comfortably at a good cadence -- better for overall speed and your knees. Remembering where you are in the gearing is important to avoid cross chaining, but otherwise is not too critical.
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Old 11-17-05, 09:24 AM
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All of my relatively flat commute allows me to stay on the middle chainring and pretty much in the midrange of the cassette.
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Old 11-17-05, 10:30 AM
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Here's a link to the same light that mechBgon mentioned, but at a cheaper price. It also has a larger picture.
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Old 11-17-05, 11:02 AM
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You shouldn't be able to throw the chain on a 24 by crossing alone. Sounds like your limiters aren't set properly, they rarely are on new bikes and is something that should be done on the first service.

Either get the Hayes book and do it yourself (only requires a screwdriver and is a simple adjustment), or go to the LBS and get tehm to do it.
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Old 11-17-05, 11:15 AM
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You need to remember when you are in either the small or big chainrings and change to the middle ring when the extreme gears are no longer needed. Most gear shifting with the right hand to keep the pedals turning at a happy speed. A helmet mounted LED would also allow you to see what gear you are in and would also make you more visible to others on the road.
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