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Old 07-24-01, 07:24 AM
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meradi
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commuting bike

Hi,

Thanks to everyone for your helpful advice!
Right now I'm riding a $5 thrift store bike, but if I keep riding it and not driving much, I plan to buy a new(er) bike next year. An incentive I guess.
I really like the cyclocross bikes I've seen, but they are so expensive. The flexibility they allow seems perfect. I really like road bikes but I do wish I could go off-road at times, or through potholes anyway.

What if I got something cheaper like a hybrid bike (like a Schwinn Sierra with the 700c wheels) and put road-style handlebars on it?
Any ideas or advice would be appreciated

And by the way, finding 27" tires now seems to be difficult, apart from Walmart kinds of stores. I went to one last night, and they only had one. I'll see how long these tires last me (I think they might have come with the bike, 20 years ago!).
Thanks again!
Brian
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Old 07-24-01, 07:28 AM
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jramsey
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That's pretty good, only having one tire of a given size.

That's good.

You might have to mail order them.

Jonathan
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Old 07-24-01, 08:38 AM
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MichaelW
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Check ou the Jamis Aurora. Its the kind of style you are looking for, but cheaper than some others (like Bianchi). Most reviews rate Jamis pretty well, esp their frame geometries and handling.
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Old 07-24-01, 09:56 AM
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mike
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Originally posted by meradi

And by the way, finding 27" tires now seems to be difficult, apart from Walmart kinds of stores. I went to one last night, and they only had one. I'll see how long these tires last me (I think they might have come with the bike, 20 years ago!).
Thanks again!
Brian
How many do you need? I know a guy who has a bunch of them in used, but very good condition. You can get them cheap. Better yet, you will be helping the environment. It is a waste to throw away useable tires for no good reason.

Contact me through the bike forums private messages (just click on my name at the left and it will bring you there) or e-mail me.

Mike
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Old 07-24-01, 05:43 PM
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Originally posted by meradi


What if I got something cheaper like a hybrid bike (like a Schwinn Sierra with the 700c wheels) and put road-style handlebars on it?

Getting a drop handlebar for a hybrid can be quite expensive (>$100) because you have to replace the shifters, brake levers, cables, etc... as well. The price of a cheap hybrid plus a drop handlebar almost equals that of an entry-level road bike like the Fuji Ace, which is quite good for commuting.
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Old 07-25-01, 06:34 AM
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Originally posted by cdc28p
Getting a drop handlebar for a hybrid can be quite expensive (>$100) because you have to replace the shifters, brake levers, cables, etc... as well. The price of a cheap hybrid plus a drop handlebar almost equals that of an entry-level road bike like the Fuji Ace, which is quite good for commuting.
Actually, you can get the drop handlebar and brake levers from the old $5.00 thrift store bike. The better bike you get at the thrift store, the better the handlebars + brake levers.

You MIGHT have to get a shim (just a thin sheet of metal) to fit the handlebars onto the handlebar stem, but a shim is only a couple of bucks.

Experiment. Have fun.
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Old 07-25-01, 10:06 AM
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Now, we're talking fun!



Jonathan
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Old 07-25-01, 10:57 AM
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Hybrid frames dont come with a gear cable tensioner, like on the downtube of most racing bikes.

If you are in the 2nd hand game, why not look for a touring bike. They are usually lighter and stronger than hybrids, and can take off road trails with ease. People have used them for cyclo-cross racing and road time trials. Being unfashionable, they are cheaper, and less attractive to theives.
Most of the cheaper CX style touring bikes are built onto low-end frames, and are heavier than proper touring bikes.
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Old 07-25-01, 11:40 AM
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I have to agree with MichaelW on this one. Good points.

Hybrids are still too heavy for distance touring and they aren't strong enough for serious off road.

If you will be mostly road biking with some gravel trail use, a touring bike would work well.

I often take my touring bikes onto packed gravel an non-paved paths and they hold up well enough. I wouldn't want to bang a touring bike around on a rough demanding trail, but for many trails, touring bikes work fine.
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Old 07-26-01, 07:54 AM
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Around here, I haven't seen much in the way of touring bikes used. After reading your comments, though, Micheal and Mike, I will keep my eyes open.

I've been riding a Trek 700 (hybrid) to work, and I'm thinking of getting another bike to have one already geared up for snow/ice. Now, I may get a touring bike and put slicks on it, and inverted tread, and maybe spikes, on my hybrid for winter.

Jonathan
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Old 12-18-05, 10:24 AM
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ken cummings
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Try Google and enter: Bianchi volpe bike. I had one for years and used it for everything from commuting, loaded touring, double centuries, to rocky, sandy jeep trails. I finally upgraded to a Bruce Gordon touring frame which can even take the single-track in Annadel Park. With 700x42 tires that is. If you do not mind a geek factor a set of bare drop or flat handlebars can be clamped to bars of the opposite type to give more hand positions. Many forum members have frames sitting in their garages. Ask around, someone may be able to supply what you need.
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