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Pannier, or other method, for school transport

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Pannier, or other method, for school transport

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Old 09-10-07, 07:18 PM
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Nachoman
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Pannier, or other method, for school transport

My 14 year old is biking to school everyday and not happy strapping his backpack to his rear rack. He carries 15-20 pounds of books, etc. (which according to him is about 37,400 cu. cm.) What pannier, or other method of transport, do you recommend that is relatively inexpensive and effective? Thanks!
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Old 09-10-07, 07:32 PM
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I've got one of these:
http://www.nashbar.com/profile.cfm?c...%3A%20Panniers
I give it a "meh." It's not a great pannier and it's not a great backpack, but it is both...

I often just throw my backpack into a grocery pannier:
http://www.banjobrothers.com/products/01080.php
And then I strap the backpack down with a bungee cord.
I suppose that a decent rack basket would work well for this too, but it might let the rain in..

If I were you, I would go to my LBS and talk it over with the folks there. There are soooo many options for this, I'm sure they'll at least give you some good ideas.

Good luck, and let us know what you decide!

Edit:
One thing to consider - if he has a locker at school, I think he has a lot more options. He can store a bag there that he can carry around and you/he won't be limited to options that are easy to carry all day..
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Old 09-10-07, 08:09 PM
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I have Arkel panniers. If you head to your local bike shop and look around at that brand you will be able to find ones that fit your son's needs well. Just make sure to get them when they're on sale or something.

Arkel is a good and durable make of panniers.
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Old 09-12-07, 10:28 AM
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Your son could stash the backpack in a front basket. This is pretty std for european students. The wicker ones hare very light and durable and probably better than wire mesh. Basil seem to be the main brand.
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Old 09-12-07, 12:18 PM
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I found that a messenger bag rides low enough on my back that I don't feel unstable cycling with one on, and my back doesn't get hot and sweaty like when I cycle with a backpack on. Patagonia makes a nice bag called the Critical Mass, and Timbuktu makes nice looking messenger bags. The nice thing about wearing the messenger bag is that you just lock up your bike and walk, instead of messing around strapping your pack to your bike, etc.

Carradice and Ortlieb both make high quality single panniers designed for commuters with dividers and compartments for laptops, books, etc., but they are not cheap by any stretch of the imagination.
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Old 09-12-07, 12:35 PM
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I used one of these Jandd commuter panniers through law school. It was great in many respects--it's spacious, durable, and you can take it off the bike and carry it around as a shoulder bag--but the bolts behind the hooks that connect to the rear rack dug little holes in some of my books. At almost $100, can't say it's cheap.
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Old 09-12-07, 12:39 PM
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I drop my backpack in a grocery pannier that is secured to my rear rack with extra zip ties. It is excellent, and the grocery pannier was cheap
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