Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Why don't coyotes act like dogs?

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Why don't coyotes act like dogs?

Old 01-19-08, 09:01 AM
  #1  
banerjek
Portland Fred
Thread Starter
 
banerjek's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 11,504

Bikes: Custom Winter, Challenge Seiran SL, Fuji Team Pro, Cattrike Road/Velokit, РOS hybrid

Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 205 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 16 Times in 12 Posts
Why don't coyotes act like dogs?

Lately, I've been seeing unusual numbers of coyotes on my commute -- last week, I saw two. Anyway, I've found that I don't treat them like dogs, and they don't act like dogs. What gives?

Example: yesterday, one was feeding on a deer carcass by the side of the road as I climbed a moderately steep hill. I maintained my pace and when I was about 25 feet away, it trotted into the woods and watched me until I passed.

Shortly afterwards, it occurred to me that my behavior was idiotic because wild animals don't like to be driven away from food and had I been bitten, I'd have to get rabies shots. My experience with dogs is that if they're by the side of the road when you come by, chances of getting a canine escort through the territory are pretty high. It's usually a good idea to relax your pace to keep from exciting them.

However, both coyotes I saw trotted off as I came near. Is this other peoples' experience with them, or do they normally act more like dogs?
banerjek is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 09:17 AM
  #2  
markhr
POWERCRANK addict
 
markhr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: North Acton, West London, UK
Posts: 3,783
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q...imal+behaviour

possibly just a precaution with a larger, faster moving, predator and also smell association with danger/gunfire. That and dogs seem to chase for fun/play.
__________________
shameless POWERCRANK plug
Recommended reading for all cyclists - Cyclecraft - Effective Cycling
Condor Cycles - quite possibly the best bike shop in London
Don't run red lights, wear a helmet, use hand signals, get some cycle lights(front and rear) and, FFS, don't run red lights!
markhr is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 09:39 AM
  #3  
ghettocruiser
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Toronto
Posts: 4,063
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Coyotes are smart.

Chasing a large, potentially deadly creature on a pointy metal thing isn't.
ghettocruiser is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 09:43 AM
  #4  
Gojohnnygo.
Burn-em Upus Icephaltus
 
Gojohnnygo.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 2,356
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I've seen eastern coyotes in packs(Larger then western coys) for years on my commute. At first they scared the hell out of me. Now it's like seeing deer on my commute. I just look out for there next move so we don't collide.
__________________
Sick BubbleGum
Gojohnnygo. is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 09:56 AM
  #5  
Gojohnnygo.
Burn-em Upus Icephaltus
 
Gojohnnygo.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 2,356
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Now that I think about it. Last year late at night, I did have an odd situation with a coy crossing the road in front of me. He or she about 45 pounds just lay-ed down in the ditch and just stared at me as I passed by.

Why don't they act like dogs because they are wild animals.
__________________
Sick BubbleGum
Gojohnnygo. is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 09:59 AM
  #6  
n4zou
Scott
 
n4zou's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,393

Bikes: Too Many

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Coyotes are open season all year in Alabama day or night. If I see one it gets shot immediately. Thats the only animal in Alabama that can be hunted at night with guns and night vision equipment on a baited field. It's a unique hunting experience.
n4zou is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 10:02 AM
  #7  
JeffS
not a role model
 
JeffS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 4,659
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
Coyotes are open season all year in Alabama day or night. If I see one it gets shot immediately. Thats the only animal in Alabama that can be hunted at night with guns and night vision equipment on a baited field. It's a unique hunting experience.
What, the fish in a bucket thing was too much of a challenge for you guys?
JeffS is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 10:15 AM
  #8  
syn0n
livin' the nightmare
 
syn0n's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: desert
Posts: 491

Bikes: '81 Centurion SS coversion, other ****

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I see them sometimes. I was walking in my neighborhood with a friend one morning and we walked within a few feet of one coyote, and didn't notice him in the bush. He was apparently so frightened he ran across the street and didn't stop. I'll catch a glimpse of the guys a maybe once every month. And they always run away when they know they've been seen.
syn0n is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 11:36 AM
  #9  
jcm
Gemutlichkeit
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 2,424
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Coyotes are highly intelligent and they know a bigger predator when they see one. We have eyes in front, and sometimes I think we may be a terrifying sight to many animals due to our lack of facial hair - which may help clue them in as to our intent. Eye contact among the higher animals is a primary communication - long before we get close enough to be sniffed for gender.

We also show our teeth more than any other animal - which probably doesn't come across as a smile to wild canines. Just watch the reaction in a pack of wolves when the big guy shows his chops. Others instantly react like our own domestic dogs by tail wagging and cowering. Well, maybe ours don't cower because they know that we don't bite much, but there's the picture. When we make eye contact with our dogs, they usually react like a lower ranking pack member - as well they should.

It's the same with wild dogs except that they usually leave the area because they aren't in our pack.

Also, coyotes have been ruthlessly hunted for at least two centuries on this continent. Being smart, I'm sure there has been some generational info passed on to their young. It's normal behavior for a coyote to give up his meal to a human because of the huge size difference. There are many accounts of humans walking right up to a feeding group of wolves and doing the same thing.. Wolves and coyoyes will wait their turn at a kill until the humans have left.

The only animals in North America that will defend their kills are the bears and big cats. But, even they will usually make themselves scare if a human approaches. Animals seem to respect head height, not body mass. Eyes in front and up high means power.
jcm is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 11:46 AM
  #10  
savethekudzu
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 575
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jcm View Post
The only animals in North America that will defend their kills are the bears and big cats.
And I, for one, have no intent to challenge their right to do so.
savethekudzu is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 12:37 PM
  #11  
San Rensho 
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 5,656
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 138 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
The coyote was probably just skitish of something bigger than he is and moved away until he saw you pass.

With domesticated dogs, the impulse to chase is their territorial nature. They have a house or yard to guard, thats their primary motivation. And they are also very comfortable around human beings and not afraid of them. So every day, at around the same time, you ride by, the dog sees you and gives chase, and you immediately run away. The dog is high fiving himself. The dog says to himself "am I good or what", I've successfully chased away an intruder. The dog of course doesn't know that you are not an intruder, but just a passerby.

My dog does this with the mailman every day. He walks up to the fence, she barks at him, runs up to the fence and then he goes away. In her mind, she has done her job successfully and she knows it.
__________________
Il faut de l'audace, encore de l'audace, toujours de l'audace

1980 3Rensho-- 1975 Raleigh Sprite 3spd
1990s Raleigh M20 MTB--2007 Windsor Hour (track)
1988 Ducati 750 F1
San Rensho is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 12:43 PM
  #12  
chipcom 
Infamous Member
 
chipcom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Ohio
Posts: 24,365

Bikes: Surly Big Dummy, Fuji World, 80ish Bianchi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Brother Coyote is no dog. His survival depends upon avoiding humans...unless, being the trickster he is, he wants to screw with you a bit.
__________________
"Let us hope our weapons are never needed --but do not forget what the common people knew when they demanded the Bill of Rights: An armed citizenry is the first defense, the best defense, and the final defense against tyranny. If guns are outlawed, only the government will have guns. Only the police, the secret police, the military, the hired servants of our rulers. Only the government -- and a few outlaws. I intend to be among the outlaws" - Edward Abbey
chipcom is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 01:00 PM
  #13  
iltb-2
Still Around
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 285
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
Thats the only animal in Alabama that can be hunted at night with guns and night vision equipment on a baited field. It's a unique hunting experience.
Yeah, sounds real sporting!
iltb-2 is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 01:02 PM
  #14  
nick burns
Senior Member
 
nick burns's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Absecon, NJ
Posts: 2,947

Bikes: Puch Luzern, Puch Mistral SLE, Bianchi Pista, Motobecane Grand Touring, Austro-Daimler Ultima, Legnano, Raleigh MountainTour, Cannondale SM600

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
If I see one it gets shot immediately.
Why?
nick burns is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 01:03 PM
  #15  
iltb-2
Still Around
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 285
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by JeffS View Post
What, the fish in a bucket thing was too much of a challenge for you guys?
They must have run out of dynamite and hand grenades for their unique sport fishing experience.
iltb-2 is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 01:04 PM
  #16  
CommuterRun
Conservative Hippie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wakulla Co. FL
Posts: 4,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ghettocruiser View Post
Coyotes are smart.

Chasing a large, potentially deadly creature on a pointy metal thing isn't.
That's pretty good.

Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
Coyotes are open season all year in Alabama day or night. If I see one it gets shot immediately. Thats the only animal in Alabama that can be hunted at night with guns and night vision equipment on a baited field. It's a unique hunting experience.
Same here, except that I don't often have anything handy to shoot one with, and wouldn't shoot down the highway if I did. I have shot them before when suitably armed and in the woods. Even at the risk of spoiling that hunting trip. We have 'yotes, but on my pre-dawn rides to work I see more foxes, normally greys. Had a young one early last summer on the side of the road that wanted to play. It didn't run off as I went by, so following my usual SOP when they do this, I turned around to come back by for another look. We wound up chasing each other around a figure eight pattern in the highway for a little bit. Then Fox went off into the woods and I continued on my way. Saw that one several times in the same place over the summer. Pretty cool.

I don't think 'yotes are as smart as foxes, but they are by no means dumb either. They know people are best given a wide berth. Especially in rural areas like this where they stand a good chance of getting a bad case of lead poisoning.
Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
If I see one it gets shot immediately.
Originally Posted by nick burns View Post
Why?
I imagine the reason in AL is the same as it is in FL. Because they are vermin. A non-native pest. Like feral dogs and house cats.

To answer your question, Banerjek, I feel perfectly safe allowing wild animals like this to move out of the way as long as they know I'm approaching. The thing I see that I would be most likely to have any kind of incident with are deer. And that's just because they're so durn flighty you don't know which way they are going to run.

Last edited by CommuterRun; 01-19-08 at 01:52 PM.
CommuterRun is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 01:58 PM
  #17  
zephyr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 483

Bikes: Surly crosscheck, Rivendell Atlantis, Ciocc Mockba80, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Coyotes are fairly common in my area, I see them occasionally when on roads or trails near the large mountain wilderness area nearby. I hear them howling at night once in a while. They are good predators around here, they mostly feed on jack rabbits. Without coyotes, the rabbit population would get way out of control. They have never bothered me on any close encounter, they usually take a quick look and head off in the other direction. Since coyotes generally don't harm people, don't understand why anyone would want to shoot them.
zephyr is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 02:10 PM
  #18  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,852

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by zephyr View Post
Coyotes are fairly common in my area, I see them occasionally when on roads or trails near the large mountain wilderness area nearby. I hear them howling at night once in a while. They are good predators around here, they mostly feed on jack rabbits. Without coyotes, the rabbit population would get way out of control. They have never bothered me on any close encounter, they usually take a quick look and head off in the other direction. Since coyotes generally don't harm people, don't understand why anyone would want to shoot them.
Around here they have a bad habit of wreaking havoc on the poultry farms. One farmer down the road had over $10,000 worth of damage done to his flocks in one night by coyotes. We have had a couple after our guineas also. They are quick to reproduce and are opportunists when it comes to food.

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon

Last edited by wahoonc; 01-19-08 at 02:44 PM.
wahoonc is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 02:21 PM
  #19  
Rex G
Senior Member
 
Rex G's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Bellaire TX USA
Posts: 821

Bikes: Bianchi Alloro, Veloce, San Remo, Pista; Rivendell Canti Rom; Zinn custom

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by San Rensho View Post
The coyote was probably just skitish of something bigger than he is and moved away until he saw you pass.

With domesticated dogs, the impulse to chase is their territorial nature. They have a house or yard to guard, thats their primary motivation. And they are also very comfortable around human beings and not afraid of them. So every day, at around the same time, you ride by, the dog sees you and gives chase, and you immediately run away. The dog is high fiving himself. The dog says to himself "am I good or what", I've successfully chased away an intruder. The dog of course doesn't know that you are not an intruder, but just a passerby.

My dog does this with the mailman every day. He walks up to the fence, she barks at him, runs up to the fence and then he goes away. In her mind, she has done her job successfully and she knows it.
I agree. Dogs that chase usually do so due to territorial reasons, though some herding breeds may feel motivated to chase when away from their territory, in an effort to herd anything that moves. Our Boxer will take off and run with a runner or cyclist because she wants to play, anywhere she sees them. She is not barking, and her body language is totally different; she just wants to play, and loves everybody. Wolves are less territorial than domesticated dogs, and coyotes are even less territorial. Coyotes certainly do not want to herd or play with us.
__________________
Have Colt, will travel...
Rex G is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 03:02 PM
  #20  
Coyote!
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Mentioned: Post(s)
Tagged: Thread(s)
Quoted: Post(s)
Well I REALLY need to weigh in here and agree with all the points listed. . .ESPECIALLY those touting intelligence [we like to think we're good lookin', too]. Fundamentally, no dogs we. Those guys are on the wolf side of the family. . .couldn't stay hidden if they tried! About the hunting, it hasn't seemed to put a dent in the family Chevy.

Chip added. . .

>>> Brother Coyote is no dog. His survival depends upon avoiding humans...unless, being the trickster he is, he wants to screw with you a bit

Love ya' buddy!
 
Old 01-19-08, 03:36 PM
  #21  
idcruiserman
Mmmmm potatoes
 
idcruiserman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Idaho
Posts: 1,921
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by n4zou View Post
Coyotes are open season all year in Alabama day or night. If I see one it gets shot immediately. Thats the only animal in Alabama that can be hunted at night with guns and night vision equipment on a baited field. It's a unique hunting experience.
It's not hunting. It's vermin extermination.
idcruiserman is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 03:36 PM
  #22  
jaypee
succumbs to errata
 
jaypee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: WI
Posts: 741
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by CommuterRun View Post
A non-native pest.
Not true.
jaypee is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 03:51 PM
  #23  
CommuterRun
Conservative Hippie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wakulla Co. FL
Posts: 4,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jaypee View Post
Not true.
Coyote

The coyote (Canis latrans), once strictly a western species, now occurs throughout the eastern United States. Coyotes began expanding their range into the Southeast in the 1960s, reaching northwestern Florida in the 1970s. In a 1981 survey, coyotes were reported in 18 of Florida's 67 counties. A similar survey in 1988 reported coyotes in 48 counties. They are most numerous in northern Florida, but their numbers appear to be increasing state- wide. The eventual occupation of the entire state is likely.

In addition to their natural range expansion, coyotes have been illegally trucked in from western states and released. Documented releases of coyotes have occurred in Gadsden, Liberty, Columbia and Polk counties. In Polk County, coyotes were released by a local fox hunter who believed he was stocking a depleted fox population with animals sold to him as "black fox." Coyotes are extremely adaptable; just about any type of forest or farmland is suitable habitat. Most of Florida, with the possible exception of the densely populated cities and the expansive saw grass marshes of the Everglades, is suitable coyote habitat.
From:
http://myfwc.com/critters/coyote.asp
And that link has much more information.

Non-native vermin.
CommuterRun is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 03:51 PM
  #24  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,288

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 92 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2471 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 102 Times in 69 Posts
Originally Posted by CommuterRun View Post
I imagine the reason in AL is the same as it is in FL. Because they are vermin. A non-native pest. Like feral dogs and house cats.
Killing just to kill something is unethical hunting. If you are going to eat the things you shoot or use the hide, then by all means shoot them. If you kill them just to kill them, you play into the hands of the anti-hunting crowd.

Secondly, the coyote ranges from Panama to Alaska and is native to all of North America. It's expansion of range into the deep south is a natural reaction to the removal of other predator species. They are just filling a hole left by the removal of something else. It's not like there was a fence at the stateline that said 'Coyotes keep out'.

Lastly, coyotes control the true vermin of the world...rats, mice, rabbits, voles, snakes, feral dogs, feral cats, feral birds, etc. We, the most efficient invasive species the planet has ever seen, have thrown things out of balance. The coyote is just doing his part to restore that balance...he just happens to be almost as good at it as we are.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Old 01-19-08, 04:10 PM
  #25  
CommuterRun
Conservative Hippie
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Wakulla Co. FL
Posts: 4,271
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Killing just to kill something is unethical hunting. If you are going to eat the things you shoot or use the hide, then by all means shoot them.
Only as it applies to game animals. A dead coyote is only good for feeding the vultures. The hide may be useful if the fur is good.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
If you kill them just to kill them, you play into the hands of the anti-hunting crowd.
These people try to spin anything they want, any way they want. To them the truth is irrelevant.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Secondly, the coyote ranges from Panama to Alaska and is native to all of North America. It's expansion of range into the deep south is a natural reaction to the removal of other predator species. They are just filling a hole left by the removal of something else. It's not like there was a fence at the stateline that said 'Coyotes keep out'.
See above
In some cases they were even trucked in and sold.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
Lastly, coyotes control the true vermin of the world...rats, mice, rabbits, voles, snakes, feral dogs, feral cats, feral birds, etc.
And in preying on the populations of native animals, i.e. rats, mice, rabbits, voles, snakes, etc., they throw the biodiversity further off balance.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
We, the most efficient invasive species the planet has ever seen, have thrown things out of balance.
This I agree with. There has been too much tampering, and coyotes in FL, AL too, are an example of that.

Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The coyote is just doing his part to restore that balance...
No, he's just a highly adaptable and destructive opportunist. Just like feral dogs and cats.

They've been here less than forty years, so just in my lifetime they've gone from none to the problem they currently are.
CommuterRun is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.