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A dirty bike is a happy biker?

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A dirty bike is a happy biker?

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Old 03-11-08, 03:49 PM
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A dirty bike is a happy biker?

I used to read the threads about obsessive-compulsive chain cleaning a lot. I was always stressed about rainy days when my chain got full of water and grit, and got frustrated adjusting my brake pads after cleaning teardowns. Then I got lazy...and my stress disappeared. Commuting became less stressful when I decided my chain and cassette were disposable items and stopped trying to keep them so clean. Spray, wipe, lube, roll....replace every 6-12 months. Bliss.

Unfortunately rim brakes in a wet climate make wheels a $$$ disposable item, as well.
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Old 03-11-08, 03:55 PM
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disc brakes, belt drives and internal gears

doity boike, whut doity boike

Yes, completely agree with you - greasy chain cleaning is a complete P.I.T.A.
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Old 03-11-08, 03:56 PM
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How often do you add air to your tires? That's when I wipe/lube my chain and clean my rims- usually every 3 or 4 rides, so once or twice a week. Takes about 5 minutes to do all that maintenance.
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Old 03-11-08, 04:09 PM
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I don't think that looking at parts as disposable is what we should accept as cyclists. We should be outraged if a drive train only lasts a year. Not only is it bad for our bank balance, its harmful to the environment, the very thing, some are trying to help by riding a bike. It used to be that drive trains lasted years and years, while recently, I installed a new 105 mid chainring that looked to have already had a life. I agree that it shouldn't have to be a ritual, maintaining a bike, I just think we should expect more. I am however happy to see products on the market that fly in the face of the trends, Items like internally geared hubs, and disc brakes. Sadly they cost so much that they often only find their way on to the bikes of the well informed and well funded. The rest have to live with expensive replacements.
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Old 03-11-08, 04:44 PM
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Yeah, my chain/gears are cleaned only when I start hearing grinding. And that's if it's sunny outside. Depends on how much rain there is - more rain = more cleaning. It's easier to get up the hills with a clean chain in any case. Rust is also bad and that happens faster than I'd like.
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Old 03-11-08, 05:00 PM
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"A dirty bike is a happy biker?"

Then I must be hysterical!
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Old 03-11-08, 05:36 PM
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I don't clean my bike at all all winter. There's just no point. I ride 8 miles of gravel/sand/clay mix road a day. If there's any moisture on the ground at all, my drivetrain is covered in sand within 2 miles of home and will be all day.
In the summer I keep the power washer hooked up, and clean the thing when it rains and relube after it dries, but apart from that I don't clean it much.
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Old 03-11-08, 05:40 PM
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I always lube my chain, otherwise it will start making noise. That however is pretty much the only maintenance i do, along with putting air in tires and changing used brake pads.
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Old 03-11-08, 05:46 PM
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Originally Posted by knucklesandwich View Post
How often do you add air to your tires? That's when I wipe/lube my chain and clean my rims- usually every 3 or 4 rides, so once or twice a week. Takes about 5 minutes to do all that maintenance.
Maybe once a month at most. I do have a wipe/lube period like that - I'm just saying I don't tear it down for a deep cleaning anymore. The grit is usually within the links of the chains so a wipe doesn't do much. I once bought a box of pipe cleaners to push the grit out of the links, back when I was more into it. (bike flossing) However to clean the gears I have to take the chain off and the mess really starts...so I never bother with that anymore. The chain usually gets lube every month or two, but far more often during rainy periods. I haven't really noticed things getting terribly worse since I began slacking off on the cleaning.

Actually this chain has about two years on it, and the cassette nearly 4 years. I've even been lazy about changing parts, as wells.

When I become rich and famous I'll get a Rohloff and never worry about cleaning again.
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Old 03-11-08, 06:09 PM
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I should have cleaned my drive train more often, if for no other reason than to wash off the road salt. That stuff just kills chains and gears. My main commuting bike (Trek 7.3 FX) has less than 1000 miles on it and I've already replaced my chain and now the chainrings and cassette are showing corrosion, too. In fact, the whole drive train, including both deraillers, is pretty much shot.

Lessons I have learned this winter:
#1: Spend the extra five minutes a week cleaning & lubing your drive train. It's worth it.
#2: SS & IGH drive trains seem to perform better and longer if you ride in winter climates.
#3: Wash road salt off your bike ASAP.
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Old 03-11-08, 06:15 PM
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Originally Posted by cbass View Post
Lessons I have learned this winter:
#1: Spend the extra five minutes a week cleaning & lubing your drive train. It's worth it.
#2: SS & IGH drive trains seem to perform better and longer if you ride in winter climates.
#3: Wash road salt off your bike ASAP.
Man...5 minutes? It used to take me about 2 hours to get my drivetrain remotely clean. Salt...glad I don't have that, yech.
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Old 03-11-08, 07:19 PM
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It only takes me 5-minutes to remove my chain, shake it in a bottle of paint thinner, and put it back on the bike and lube it. I just don't understand where the hassle is with having a clean drivetrain.

I like my chain to be clean because it shifts better and my parts last longer. I'm a 10,000 mile + per year cyclist and my component replacement costs are already high... poor maintenance would only increase the cost. And going through parts more quickly means more environmental impact.

I also like to keep my bike clean because it's more than just a machine to me... I tend to grow attached to bikes over time, and I feel bad when I neglect them. I'll still ride in the rain and salt/sand, but I try to give the bike a 15-minute wash job afterwards, and I run some sandpaper over the brake pads to get the road grit and embedded aluminum off of them.

So I guess I'm the opposite of the OP - I'm a happier cyclist when my bike is clean... just my 2-cents.
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Old 03-11-08, 07:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Andreasaway View Post
I am however happy to see products on the market that fly in the face of the trends, Items like internally geared hubs, and disc brakes.
Disc brakes "fly in the face of the trends"? Disc brakes are the new V-brakes!
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Old 03-11-08, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by matthew_deaner View Post
It only takes me 5-minutes to remove my chain, shake it in a bottle of paint thinner, and put it back on the bike and lube it. I just don't understand where the hassle is with having a clean drivetrain.
Even with degreaser my chain needs every link flossed to get the grit out. Then both sides of each sprocket and chainring and pulley need cleaning - no point in cleaning a chain and then putting it back on dirty gears. All that is easily over an hour - especially cleaning all those teeth in the cassette. If I put in that much time then I also clean the grime off the wheels and try to get the grit out of the brake pads. Then I've got dirty towels and pipe cleaners to deal with after I'm finished. Ugh
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Old 03-11-08, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
Even with degreaser my chain needs every link flossed to get the grit out.
Then you're using the wrong degreaser, or not cleaning often enough.

To clean the cassette, get a park tool gear brush and give it a rub when you're cleaning the bike. Doesn't have to be perfect.

Front chainrings don't need cleaned very often, but if it bothers you, try a rag and paint thinner. Works great.
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Old 03-11-08, 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by bkrownd View Post
Man...5 minutes? It used to take me about 2 hours to get my drivetrain remotely clean. Salt...glad I don't have that, yech.
Yeah, 5 minutes or so for a quickie wipe-down & lube job. Just to get the salt & gunk off the moving parts. For a more thorough cleaning it definitely takes longer .

Yes, be glad you don't have salt! It's corrosive & nasty. This was my first winter as a bike commuter and I've learned a real lesson about what it will do to a bike if not removed .
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Old 03-11-08, 07:46 PM
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Originally Posted by matthew_deaner View Post
It only takes me 5-minutes to remove my chain, shake it in a bottle of paint thinner, and put it back on the bike and lube it. I just don't understand where the hassle is with having a clean drivetrain.

I like my chain to be clean because it shifts better and my parts last longer. I'm a 10,000 mile + per year cyclist and my component replacement costs are already high... poor maintenance would only increase the cost. And going through parts more quickly means more environmental impact.

I also like to keep my bike clean because it's more than just a machine to me... I tend to grow attached to bikes over time, and I feel bad when I neglect them. I'll still ride in the rain and salt/sand, but I try to give the bike a 15-minute wash job afterwards, and I run some sandpaper over the brake pads to get the road grit and embedded aluminum off of them.

So I guess I'm the opposite of the OP - I'm a happier cyclist when my bike is clean... just my 2-cents.

+1

You and me both. I am not quite a 10,000 mile a year cyclist but somewhere around 7000 plus. Components do not last long for me either without maintenance.
Call me nutty but cleaning a bike is a good way for me to relax. Grab a chair, degreaser, towel, water, brush, and go to town.
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Old 03-11-08, 08:16 PM
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Does anyone else use this method? http://nordicgroup.us/chain/

I do. Every weekend. Takes about five minutes. The rest of my bike is filthy. I don't do 10K a year (or anywhere near it). I do around 2K miles per year. This is my first year round biking, but this method seems to work for me.
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Old 03-11-08, 08:23 PM
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I don't clean my chain because for me, it doesn't matter. I tried cleaning my chain every weekend, and I tried just putting a chain on, lubing it once a week, wiping it down and never cleaning it. Regardless it lasts 1800 miles. The reason is that if I clean it, within 2 miles it's filthy again. I've tried 5 different lubes too, doesn't matter. It doesn't change how long it takes for my sprockets to wear out either.
If your commute is on pavement exclusively, then I can imagine that you can make a chain last quite a long time. For me I am basically covering my chain with fines on every ride; cleaning just gets the pulverized stuff out of the links and allows nice new freshly sharp abrasive to get in.

I don't know how you can get a chain off, clean it, put it back on and lube it properly in 5 minutes. I'm using kerosene as a solvent, I can't imagine anything working any better (I've tried Pedros and Performance solvents, they didn't work as well as kerosene). One week after installing a new chain it takes me a good 15 minutes to get it anything like clean. I put it in a jar with solvent, shake the crud out of it for a couple of minutes, remove it, replace the solvent, repeat, it takes about 4 tries until the chain doesn't crunch (sound of sand in the links) when I bend it.

Chains cost $5. At 1800 miles on a chain, I'm spending about $15 a year on chains. I think it would have to take me about 14 seconds to clean a chain for it to be cost effective for me to do so.

The only thing I get from a lubed chain is the pleasure of the drivetrain running smoothly, and I get that from a lubed and wiped down chain; I can't feel the difference after a cleaning so there's no benefit.
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Old 03-11-08, 08:29 PM
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Originally Posted by ItsJustMe View Post
I don't do it because for me, it doesn't matter. I tried cleaning my chain every weekend, and I tried just putting a chain on, lubing it once a week, wiping it down and never cleaning it. Regardless it lasts 1800 miles. The reason is that if I clean it, within 2 miles it's filthy again. I've tried 5 different lubes too, doesn't matter.
If your commute is on pavement exclusively, then I can imagine that you can make a chain last quite a long time. For me I am basically covering my chain with fines on every ride; cleaning just gets the pulverized stuff out of the links and allows nice new freshly sharp abrasive to get in.
That sounds awful. Do you live on a gravel road? I did about a decade ago and it totally wrecked my chains and rims... and it was almost impossible to keep my bikes and car clean.
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Old 03-12-08, 12:09 AM
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Originally Posted by matthew_deaner View Post
Then you're using the wrong degreaser, or not cleaning often enough.
Simple Green. As to the second half, maybe according to some. Cleaning bikes, like watching TV, making beds and folding underwear, is time wasted and forever lost. I'm done with it.
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Old 03-12-08, 03:08 AM
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I had been thinking about that more recently, working through the challenges of the times surely. I look at my chain and notice the buildup. I wonder if it is worth it. A mountain bike that covers some rough terrain is my choice of vehicle. Sand and dirt abound on some of my favorite trails. Perhaps in that circumstance it does make sense to clean regularly and I may go ahead and try my hand at it a weekend at a time. Will see if it makes that much difference. Great insight so willingly shared thanks.
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Old 03-12-08, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by matthew_deaner View Post
That sounds awful. Do you live on a gravel road? I did about a decade ago and it totally wrecked my chains and rims... and it was almost impossible to keep my bikes and car clean.
I don't live on one, but the most direct route to work goes over them. There are two alternate routes; one is 2.2 extra miles over really bad pavement (rougher than the gravel most of the time) on a 2 lane road that's infamous for half-asleep commuters going 65 in a 50 zone and no shoulder and 6" dropoff into the gravel on the side. The other is 6 miles extra (over a normal 10.5 mile route).

The gravel is actually pretty smooth most of the time, but it is dirty. During spring melt it falls apart and parts of it are like riding through molasses as the top 2 or 3 inches melts into mud and there's nowhere for the water to go until the underlying frost breaks. For most of the year it's OK except for a few days after they grade it, then it's a field of grape to golf ball sized rocks over a hard surface, until we get a little rain and cars drive on it to soften the clay and the cars push the rocks down into the clay. Then it's smooth again.
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Old 03-12-08, 09:33 AM
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As needed, I'll run my Finish Line chain cleaner filled with Dumonde Tech degreaser then wipe down the chain with a clean rag before re-lubing with Finish Line Wet (spring,fall,winter) or Dry (summer).
Once a week I'll clean my bike. I use store brand non-bleach counter wipes to clean the frame, fenders, and get the grit/gunk off the rims. It takes 5 - 10 minutes and gives me the assurance that my reflective tape is clean and shiny for my early morning commute.

I just bought a new bike this year, so I'm kind of obsessive about its appearance.
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Old 03-12-08, 09:45 AM
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I arrive at work early, and tend to spend a few minutes wiping down the bike and generally cleaning it with disposable wipes (armorall orange cleaning wipes). I will lube where I feel it wants it, and after a few minutes of this, I have cooled down enough to shower and get dressed. Results in the bike being reasonably clean most of the time - now in the winter it is definitely not as clean as it is on nice dry summer days (Damn I could use one of those now), but even in the wet and ugly days, the bike is kept in decent shape.
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