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Converting a hybrid (SU100) to a commuter bike?

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Converting a hybrid (SU100) to a commuter bike?

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Old 06-03-08, 03:57 PM
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itsthewoo
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Converting a hybrid (SU100) to a commuter bike?

I currently have a Trek SU100, and I was initially considering buying a new bike to facilitate my commute to school, but thought about just putting parts on the Trek.

Would getting drop bars + smaller tires suffice to getting it close to a cyclocross style bike for commuting?

Or should I just sell the frame and buy a cyclocross bike?
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Old 06-03-08, 04:00 PM
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Why can't you commute on it as is?

I like drop bars too, but it's an expensive conversion. Bars + brifters (or shifters and brake levers) travel agents or new brakes, bar tape, cables...it adds up.
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Old 06-05-08, 10:12 AM
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I haven't made any significant changes to my hybrid, besides swapping the tires out with some 700x32 Schwalbe Marathons, and I commute fine with it.
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Old 06-05-08, 11:21 AM
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Drop bar conversion will cost alot because you'll also need to swap your shifters and brake levers. A trekking/butterfly bar will use your stock controls,give you lots of hand positions,and let you get aero. If you're in a heavily urban area,you might not even need to swap the bars. Here in DC,if you're not on a MUP,you can't really go more than a mile or two without haveing to stop for traffic,which really moots the need for a drop bar. Skinnier tires really won't help much unless your stock ones are low pressure(65-70psi),have a fair bit of tread,and/or are heavy. Look up the specs for your tires and see how they compare to say a set of Conti Sport Contacts in 1.3".

Really,you'd do better putting a set of full fenders,lights and a rack on your SU. Then commute on it and see if you find yourself needing a different bar or tires.
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Old 06-05-08, 11:31 AM
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All you need to turn your ride into a commuter is to ride it to some destination and...presto, you've got a commuter. If you put fenders on it, you'll have a bike that you ride places with fenders on it.
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Old 06-05-08, 12:19 PM
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Originally Posted by adebrunner View Post
All you need to turn your ride into a commuter is to ride it to some destination and...presto, you've got a commuter. If you put fenders on it, you'll have a bike that you ride places with fenders on it.

+1 LOL!
Oh so eloquent!
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Old 06-05-08, 12:32 PM
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Skinny tires = free speed usually, and you need a way to carry your whatever you bring to school. So a rack and trunk bag or pannier (or messenger bag, or Carradice style saddle bag) and skinny slick tires after the current ones wear out, and a good lock.
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Old 06-05-08, 01:10 PM
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Why drop bars? I have this bike---I have since added fenders---and it works just fine for me for a commuter bike. Panniers on both sides, a rack trunk, and two tail lights and two headlights I also have clipless pedals on one side of the pedal and platforms on the other, Shimano M-41 shoes.





Granted, I only travel at about 15 mph., but it does get the job done.

Tim C.
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Old 06-05-08, 01:19 PM
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Originally Posted by referee54 View Post
Why drop bars? I have this bike---I have since added fenders---and it works just fine for me for a commuter bike. Panniers on both sides, a rack trunk, and two tail lights and two headlights I also have clipless pedals on one side of the pedal and platforms on the other, Shimano M-41 shoes.





Granted, I only travel at about 15 mph., but it does get the job done.

Tim C.
Drop bars give you 4 hand positions, two of which give you different degrees of improved aerodynamics.

In at least 2 of the 4 positions, the brakes are at your fingertips and perhaps also the shifters depending on the setup. This isn't true of the bar end and trekking bar arrangements that I've seen.
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Old 06-05-08, 01:28 PM
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Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
Drop bars give you 4 hand positions, two of which give you different degrees of improved aerodynamics.

In at least 2 of the 4 positions, the brakes are at your fingertips and perhaps also the shifters depending on the setup. This isn't true of the bar end and trekking bar arrangements that I've seen.
I weigh 225. The last thing that i am worried about is aerodynamics! Seriously...I had a decent road bike a while back; I like the comfort of what I use now. I can ride on the road, I can ride on MUP's if I need to, and the tires and such are great for crushed limestone, which we have on the Towpath Trails.

Tim C.
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Old 06-05-08, 01:29 PM
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Big drop bar fan here. Just be aware that if you do make this change, you may soon find yourself wanting a new "faster" frame as well. You are playing with upgrade fire, my friend .

I agree that it will be costly. You may be better off buying a used bike already set up with drop bars.
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Old 06-05-08, 01:43 PM
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Originally Posted by referee54 View Post
I weigh 225. The last thing that i am worried about is aerodynamics! Seriously...I had a decent road bike a while back; I like the comfort of what I use now. I can ride on the road, I can ride on MUP's if I need to, and the tires and such are great for crushed limestone, which we have on the Towpath Trails.

Tim C.
Somebody asked "why drop bars?" and I answered. I agree they're not for everybody. I also agree that it's an expensive conversion if you buy all new parts and that it may make more sense just to get a bike that's designed for them if that's what you really want.

However, converting to drop bars might be a fun project if you're into that kind of thing. If you go with used parts and bar-end shifters instead of STIs it doesn't even have to be that expensive. Some people like bar-ends better anyway.
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