Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Surly LHT-Anyone built one w/650B wheelset?

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Surly LHT-Anyone built one w/650B wheelset?

Reply

Old 07-27-08, 12:13 PM
  #1  
uprightbent
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Washington DC area
Posts: 267
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Surly LHT-Anyone built one w/650B wheelset?

My correct size seems to be the 54cm model which is when Surly uses the 26" wheels from 54 on down. I don't particularly like 26" wheels and I know the 650b's are only 1 inch larger, and of course wheel and tire choices are limited. Would love to see some photos if anyone has tried this. Also would there be any brake reach issues?

Thanks in advance!
uprightbent is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 01:11 PM
  #2  
d2create
Senior Member
 
d2create's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Houston we have a problem
Posts: 2,914
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I too am curious. I was just looking at the LHT for my wife who needs a 52 or a 54 and I don't like 26" either, especially when we ride together.
I have 650b's now too, so that would be cool to have them on both.
d2create is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 02:27 PM
  #3  
uprightbent
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Washington DC area
Posts: 267
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
MY intent would actually be to build a "cheap Rivendell". Much in the same colors and theme as the beautiful AHH you just built.

I would go with Surly's green instead of their blue and add a brown brooks, etc. I'm planning on Nitto noodles since moustache bars don't work for me. I thought of upgrading an already built LHT but I don't want any black parts on it like bearing cups, rims, etc., just all bright aluminum including polished 650 rims if I can find them? I also like 165 cranks so I guess it makes sense to do this one on my own, it would be my first build.

I'm told the LHT geometry is much like the Atlantis so that means I can start this project with a $400 frame instead of $1,600? Of course it won't be lugged with creme filling.
uprightbent is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 02:56 PM
  #4  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,038

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2265 Post(s)
Originally Posted by uprightbent View Post
My correct size seems to be the 54cm model which is when Surly uses the 26" wheels from 54 on down. I don't particularly like 26" wheels and I know the 650b's are only 1 inch larger, and of course wheel and tire choices are limited. Would love to see some photos if anyone has tried this. Also would there be any brake reach issues?

Thanks in advance!
I doubt that there is any brake that has the kind of adjustment you need to convert from a 26" to a 650C. The rim diameter difference is 11mm. The difference between a 700C and a 27" is only 6mm and that conversion often has reach issues. Almost doubling the distance won't make things any simpler.

There's nothing wrong with 26" wheels, however. Mountain bikes have rims that are very bit as light as road rims and the tire selection is far better and much easier to find. You won't notice any difference in performance between a 650C and a 26" wheel. You probably wouldn't notice any difference between a 26" wheel and a 700C, other than standover height...which is why Surly puts 26" wheels on it's smaller frames anyway.

Stick with the 26". It'd make life much simpler.
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 03:40 PM
  #5  
77midget
me ride bike good
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: outside Boston, MA
Posts: 462

Bikes: Trek 4300

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is another reason for the 26" on the smaller frames to avoid toe strike with the front tire during turning?
77midget is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 03:49 PM
  #6  
Industrial
^_^
 
Industrial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 657

Bikes: Cannondale System Six, Specialized FSR-XC, Specialized Langster, Univega Arrow Spot, Raleigh Sports

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I was thinking about doing a LHT build myself and I was going to go with a 54cm frame(56cm would be the right size for me) just for 26 inch wheels. I'm curious why the move to 650b wheels from 26?
Industrial is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 04:04 PM
  #7  
uprightbent
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Washington DC area
Posts: 267
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
The rim diameter difference is 11mm.
Isn't the diameter difference between a 650b (584mm) and a 26" MTB (559mm) 25mm or about an inch? Does this mean the spot where the brake would hit the rim would be about 12.5mm higher? Since I don't know about these brake issues is it the pivot angle that's the problem or do you lose braking power since the bosses for the cantilever mounting points end up much lower than intended on a conversion?
uprightbent is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 05:15 PM
  #8  
dmckean44
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: San Diego
Posts: 62
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You might be better off using calipers instead of cantilevers if you don't plan to do any fully load touring with this bike.
dmckean44 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 05:18 PM
  #9  
zephyr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 483

Bikes: Surly crosscheck, Rivendell Atlantis, Ciocc Mockba80, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by cyccommute View Post
I doubt that there is any brake that has the kind of adjustment you need to convert from a 26" to a 650C. The rim diameter difference is 11mm. The difference between a 700C and a 27" is only 6mm and that conversion often has reach issues. Almost doubling the distance won't make things any simpler.

There's nothing wrong with 26" wheels, however. Mountain bikes have rims that are very bit as light as road rims and the tire selection is far better and much easier to find. You won't notice any difference in performance between a 650C and a 26" wheel. You probably wouldn't notice any difference between a 26" wheel and a 700C, other than standover height...which is why Surly puts 26" wheels on it's smaller frames anyway.

Stick with the 26". It'd make life much simpler.
Cycc, you got this one covered. The other reason they use 26" wheels on smaller frames is it makes the frame geometry more symmetric and there are fewer front tire interference issues. I would leave well enough alone and go with the 26" rim on LHT. Endless 26" tire and rim choices to make for a plenty cushy or plenty fast ride.

I have an old Cannondale touring bike that was factory built for 27" wheels. When I later switched those to 700C I found that none of the recent vintage short arm cantilever brake arms contact the rim properly on the front fork (Avid shorty, Tektro Oryx, etc). I found an old suntour canti that has just enough adjustment vertical height to just reach the 700C rim. If this happens on a 6 mm reduction in rim height, I can only imagine what problems happen with a 11-12 mm increase in rim height from the canti brake post. The only other possible thing that might work on a 26" to 650b conversion might be a super long arm sidepull brake, which are probably not as effective as a well adjusted canti on a nice 26" rim.
zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 09:16 PM
  #10  
cyccommute 
Mad bike riding scientist
 
cyccommute's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 21,038

Bikes: Some silver ones, a red one, an orange one and a few titanium ones

Mentioned: 84 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2265 Post(s)
Originally Posted by uprightbent View Post
Isn't the diameter difference between a 650b (584mm) and a 26" MTB (559mm) 25mm or about an inch? Does this mean the spot where the brake would hit the rim would be about 12.5mm higher? Since I don't know about these brake issues is it the pivot angle that's the problem or do you lose braking power since the bosses for the cantilever mounting points end up much lower than intended on a conversion?
I misread it as a 650C, not a 650B. The difference is even bigger and you are correct. That's even worse. Not many brakes have that kind of adjustment on height. Most modern cantis have little to no adjustment (older ones had more).
__________________
Stuart Black
Pokin' around the Poconos A cold ride around Lake Erie
Dinosaurs in Colorado A mountain bike guide to the Purgatory Canyon dinosaur trackway
Solo Without Pie. The search for pie in the Midwest.
Picking the Scablands. Washington and Oregon, 2005. Pie and spiders on the Columbia River!
Days of Wineless Roads. Bed and Breakfasting along the KATY
Twisting Down the Alley. Misadventures in tornado alley.
An Good Ol' Fashion Appalachian Butt Whoopin'.
cyccommute is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 09:23 PM
  #11  
Industrial
^_^
 
Industrial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 657

Bikes: Cannondale System Six, Specialized FSR-XC, Specialized Langster, Univega Arrow Spot, Raleigh Sports

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Well, regardless of why you want to do this conversion, people in mountain bike world get by this with disc brakes. You could do a disc in the front and drum in the back. It seems like alot of trouble for no reason but w/e floats your boat.
Industrial is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-08, 09:40 PM
  #12  
CHenry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 912

Bikes: A bunch

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
The answer is that it is possible and can work well. I converted my 56 cm Atlantis, which was made for 26 in (559) wheels to a 650B bike by building a wheelset and changing the original cantilever brakes to Tektro Oryx brakes, which are adjustable enough to reach the larger rim. If you are using a linear brake, I suppose Paul Components' Moto-BMX might also work as they are designed with high adjustability in mind.

I have found that the larger wheel not only makes the bike feel faster, but that 650B gives a smoother ride than the 26 in. slicks I was using on the smaller wheels, and the bottom bracket, being low already on the Atlantis, was not raised enough to affect handling for the worse.
CHenry is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 08:00 AM
  #13  
Lamplight
Senior Member
 
Lamplight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Bellingham, WA
Posts: 2,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CHenry View Post
The answer is that it is possible and can work well. I converted my 56 cm Atlantis, which was made for 26 in (559) wheels to a 650B bike by building a wheelset and changing the original cantilever brakes to Tektro Oryx brakes, which are adjustable enough to reach the larger rim. If you are using a linear brake, I suppose Paul Components' Moto-BMX might also work as they are designed with high adjustability in mind.

I have found that the larger wheel not only makes the bike feel faster, but that 650B gives a smoother ride than the 26 in. slicks I was using on the smaller wheels, and the bottom bracket, being low already on the Atlantis, was not raised enough to affect handling for the worse.
I would never have guessed there was any cantilever that was adjustable enough to do this. 27" to 700C is not a problem with most canti bikes, but it's not a very big difference, either. Any pictures of the bike?

To the OP: also remember, the LHT has loads of tire clearance, but converting to a taller wheel would most certainly do away with much of that. Still, if you didn't use a massive tire you may still be able to run fenders. (I as able to fit fenders even with a 26 x 2.35 Big Apple!)
Lamplight is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 08:25 AM
  #14  
UprightJoe
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you want 650B wheels, have you considered a Rivendell Bleriot frame instead of the LHT? I've seen it for about the same price online. You'd probably want to act fast ordering one though because it's been discontinued for the moment.
UprightJoe is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 10:06 AM
  #15  
HardyWeinberg
GATC
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south Puget Sound
Posts: 8,673
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Industrial View Post
Well, regardless of why you want to do this conversion, people in mountain bike world get by this with disc brakes. You could do a disc in the front and drum in the back. It seems like alot of trouble for no reason but w/e floats your boat.
Just swap in a disc fork for the LHT fork.
HardyWeinberg is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 10:31 AM
  #16  
J.C. Koto
apocryphal sobriquet
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Star City, NE
Posts: 1,076

Bikes: 2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker "The Truckerino"

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CHenry View Post
The answer is that it is possible and can work well. I converted my 56 cm Atlantis, which was made for 26 in (559) wheels to a 650B bike by building a wheelset and changing the original cantilever brakes to Tektro Oryx brakes, which are adjustable enough to reach the larger rim. If you are using a linear brake, I suppose Paul Components' Moto-BMX might also work as they are designed with high adjustability in mind.

I have found that the larger wheel not only makes the bike feel faster, but that 650B gives a smoother ride than the 26 in. slicks I was using on the smaller wheels, and the bottom bracket, being low already on the Atlantis, was not raised enough to affect handling for the worse.
Guess what kind of brakes the stock LHT complete has I was just looking real hard at my 52cm LHT today, doing some mental calculations, and I *think* it might work. The wheels themselves would fit fine, but I think the stock Oryx cantis might have *just* enough wiggle room to fit a 584mm rim. I mean barely.

The stock brakes would work if the brake pads were fudged a bit, as in angled up and filed down to level out on the rim, but I think just sliding the pad posts all the way out might work. If I could obtain a 584mm rim + tube + tire I'd love to verify this as an experiment Of course the geometry would get a bit mangle-fandangled, but a small price to pay for science!

EDIT Not that there's any practical reason to do this unless one has a bunch of 650B's sitting around. The 26er are just fine...

Last edited by J.C. Koto; 07-28-08 at 10:34 AM. Reason: disclaimed...
J.C. Koto is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 10:33 AM
  #17  
CHenry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 912

Bikes: A bunch

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg View Post
Just swap in a disc fork for the LHT fork.
Or consider the Steelwool Tweed frame which is already set up for discs.
CHenry is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 10:51 AM
  #18  
dynaryder
PatronSaintOfDiscBrakes
 
dynaryder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: BicycleSPACE warehouse in SW Washington DC
Posts: 6,980
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Or Novara Safari. Alum frame,but still great ride quality. Discs,wide gear range,rear rack,will take front and full fenders,adj stem and trekking bar,loads of tire clearance,great handling(I used to use mine for polo),and way cheaper than the above offerings(esp if you've got an REI dividend or coupon). And unlike the other bikes,if you don't like it you can return it.
__________________

C'dale BBU('05 and '09)/Super Six/Hooligan8and 3,Kona Dew Deluxe,Novara Buzz/Safari,Surly Big Dummy,Marin Pt Reyes,Giant Defy 1,Schwinn DBX SuperSport,Dahon Speed Pro TT,Brompton S6L/S2E-X
dynaryder is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 11:34 AM
  #19  
vik 
cyclopath
 
vik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Victoria, BC
Posts: 5,264

Bikes: Surly Krampus, Surly Straggler, Pivot Mach 6, Bike Friday Tikit, Bike Friday Tandem, Santa Cruz Nomad

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can't see the appeal in buying a bike designed for one wheel size and then putting a whole bunch of effort into modifying it for a different wheel size. Particularly when there is little difference between the two options.

26" wheels are quite versatile. You can get high pressure narrow tires, you can get varying widths of touring tires from 1.3" all the way up to 2.35. If you want a higher volume low pressure tire similar to what 650B is known for those are available as well. Best of all if you ever need parts/tires, etc... almost any LBS can help you out.

If you really have to have 650B just buy a frame designed for that in the first place. There are several options at different price points to choose from.
__________________
safe riding - Vik
VikApproved
vik is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 01:38 PM
  #20  
CHenry
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Mid-Atlantic
Posts: 912

Bikes: A bunch

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Originally Posted by vik View Post
I can't see the appeal in buying a bike designed for one wheel size and then putting a whole bunch of effort into modifying it for a different wheel size. Particularly when there is little difference between the two options.

26" wheels are quite versatile. You can get high pressure narrow tires, you can get varying widths of touring tires from 1.3" all the way up to 2.35. If you want a higher volume low pressure tire similar to what 650B is known for those are available as well. Best of all if you ever need parts/tires, etc... almost any LBS can help you out.

If you really have to have 650B just buy a frame designed for that in the first place. There are several options at different price points to choose from.
Makes sense, but many 650B applications are after-market. Also, there is the issue of cost and size. Not everyone wants to sink the amount of money a new purpose-built 650B frameset will cost (although to their credit Kogswell, Bleriot and Rawland are doing a pretty good job of narrowing the price difference with Surly.) With a 26 to 650B, there is the possibility of switching back and forth, depending on the rider or even the planned use. For a daily rider, 650B could be fun; for a serious tour, 26 in might be the better choice. Why not have a choice? I know how custom builders can go on about the frame being fit to the wheel, but where is still room for flexibility, shouldn't one take advantage of that?
CHenry is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 08:59 PM
  #21  
zephyr
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Lake Forest, CA
Posts: 483

Bikes: Surly crosscheck, Rivendell Atlantis, Ciocc Mockba80, Surly Troll

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by Lamplight View Post
To the OP: also remember, the LHT has loads of tire clearance, but converting to a taller wheel would most certainly do away with much of that. Still, if you didn't use a massive tire you may still be able to run fenders. (I as able to fit fenders even with a 26 x 2.35 Big Apple!)
Don't mean to hijack a thread, but lamplight, you are able to get a 26x2.35 big apple onto a LHT frame, with fenders? Is that a 54cm frame? Wow, the surly spec sheet says LHT max tire size = 26x2.1.

How does the fat tire LHT handle off pavement, on dirt or gravel roads? I don't mean aggressive technical single track, but as a touring or transportation bike on dirt or gravel roads as well as paved roads. Don't know of any other good frame under $500 for 26" fat tires that have nice braze ons for carrying racks and fenders front and back. A 54 LHT with fat tires is a few cm smaller than I would normally ride (typically 57-58 road bike) but I think it would be fine if I left the steering tube tall enough to get the bars up even with the seat.
zephyr is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-08, 10:51 PM
  #22  
Industrial
^_^
 
Industrial's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: New Hampshire
Posts: 657

Bikes: Cannondale System Six, Specialized FSR-XC, Specialized Langster, Univega Arrow Spot, Raleigh Sports

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Originally Posted by CHenry View Post
Makes sense, but many 650B applications are after-market. Also, there is the issue of cost and size. Not everyone wants to sink the amount of money a new purpose-built 650B frameset will cost (although to their credit Kogswell, Bleriot and Rawland are doing a pretty good job of narrowing the price difference with Surly.) With a 26 to 650B, there is the possibility of switching back and forth, depending on the rider or even the planned use. For a daily rider, 650B could be fun; for a serious tour, 26 in might be the better choice. Why not have a choice? I know how custom builders can go on about the frame being fit to the wheel, but where is still room for flexibility, shouldn't one take advantage of that?
I don't understand how a 650B could be funner than a 26 inch wheel. I can barely understand a company choosing to spec a frame for 650B to keep the dimensions right. Why are you going through all this trouble?
Industrial is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-08, 04:57 AM
  #23  
Lamplight
Senior Member
 
Lamplight's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Bellingham, WA
Posts: 2,773
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)
Originally Posted by zephyr View Post
Don't mean to hijack a thread, but lamplight, you are able to get a 26x2.35 big apple onto a LHT frame, with fenders? Is that a 54cm frame? Wow, the surly spec sheet says LHT max tire size = 26x2.1.

How does the fat tire LHT handle off pavement, on dirt or gravel roads? I don't mean aggressive technical single track, but as a touring or transportation bike on dirt or gravel roads as well as paved roads. Don't know of any other good frame under $500 for 26" fat tires that have nice braze ons for carrying racks and fenders front and back. A 54 LHT with fat tires is a few cm smaller than I would normally ride (typically 57-58 road bike) but I think it would be fine if I left the steering tube tall enough to get the bars up even with the seat.

Oops, I forgot to mention that this was just an LHT fork on my commuter, so I'm not sure about the rear. And the front was very close. I eventually put the 2.35s on another bike and just went with 2.0 Big Apples.
Lamplight is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-08, 08:03 AM
  #24  
GV27
Light Makes Right
 
GV27's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Green Mountain, Colorado
Posts: 1,520

Bikes: Gianni Motta Criterium, Dean Hardtail

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Originally Posted by uprightbent View Post
I'm told the LHT geometry is much like the Atlantis so that means I can start this project with a $400 frame instead of $1,600? Of course it won't be lugged with creme filling.
FYI, you can also get a Riv Bleriot on Ebay for $650. Take 650B no problem. More like the AAH than the Atlantis, but still lugged with creme filling!
GV27 is offline  
Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-08, 09:55 AM
  #25  
HardyWeinberg
GATC
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: south Puget Sound
Posts: 8,673
Mentioned: 27 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 442 Post(s)
Originally Posted by zephyr View Post
Don't mean to hijack a thread, but lamplight, you are able to get a 26x2.35 big apple onto a LHT frame, with fenders? Is that a 54cm frame? Wow, the surly spec sheet says LHT max tire size = 26x2.1.
I have a lot of room between my 2.0 big apples and cascadia fenders. 2.35s could be sweet (54 cm frame). (and still room between the fenders and any other stuff like the pump on the back of my seat tube, or my toes on the pedal)
HardyWeinberg is offline  
Reply With Quote

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service