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Bike Rack Commuters: How do you secure your ride?

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Bike Rack Commuters: How do you secure your ride?

Old 08-07-08, 05:48 PM
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uke
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Bike Rack Commuters: How do you secure your ride?

Of course, it's best to have a private garage, or to be able to take one's bike indoors. But for those of us who can't, how do you secure your ride to the local hitching post? And have you ever had theft issues/complaints where you park?
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Old 08-07-08, 06:59 PM
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if it was me i would just take my panniers into wherever im going, most can come off pretty quickly
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Old 08-07-08, 07:07 PM
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I don't have to lock up at work, but look into getting an long (least 3ft) cable lock and go through all your wheels, seat, etc. and finish that off w/ a U-lock to the frame/back wheel. this is a pretty hot topic, search the forum for more suggestions.
the best piece of advice on the subject i've gotten is: A $5 cable lock to lock up your $1000 bike probably isn't the best investment.
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Old 08-07-08, 07:07 PM
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I lock up mine in my cube so I might not be the best person to ask for advise on this. I know Sheldon Brown had a great artical on this subject. I will see if I can find it again, I had looked it up for my son so he lock up his ride at his job.
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Old 08-07-08, 07:14 PM
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From Sheldon "Belt And Suspenders" Brown
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Old 08-07-08, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by nubcake View Post
if it was me i would just take my panniers into wherever im going, most can come off pretty quickly
He means the rack you lock your bike to, not the one on your bike.



I put a Kryptonite lock through the back wheel. I have a heavy cable that loops on the front wheel and frame and a light one for the seat. I put one end of the cable through it's other end and then onto the lock.
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Old 08-07-08, 08:37 PM
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I leave the Kryptonite NY Fugetaboutit chain lock on the rack at work. I wrap that around my rear wheel and through the frame. I also take a cable lock with me on the bike and wrap that around the front wheel and frame.

If someone defeats both of those locks, they deserve my bike.

PS, this is a low crime area.
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Old 08-07-08, 08:39 PM
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I use a heavy covered chain to go through the frame, the front wheel and the bike rack. Then I use a u-lock to secure the back wheel to the frame.
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Old 08-07-08, 09:46 PM
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If you want to secure your panniers or a backpack, there is always the PacSafe steel mesh "bag" you can put your stuff in, then lock it with the bike. It will keep a casual thief away, but won't keep someone with wire cutters or bolt cutters.
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Old 08-07-08, 10:16 PM
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I feel fairly secure locking my bike outside during work, despite living in the newly crowned US theft capital, and despite there having been two bikes stolen from there (one had only a cable, the other had a cheap u-bolt but was left while the owner went to happy hour):
1. Fairly strong u-lock, attached in a variation on Sheldon-style (around the rack and the seatstays, through the back wheel).
2. Cheap old u-lock locking the front wheel to the frame.
3. Cable through saddle rails, frame, and rack.

So if you want to take my bike, you have to defeat the strong u-lock (which is locked with almost no extra space, for some protection against leverage attacks) and the cable. If you want to ride it away, you also have to defeat the other u-lock.

And finally, the two bikes I commute on were relatively low-end bike shop bikes when they were new, in the early 90s. The Sirrus Sport is pretty and red, but nobody's going to be lusting after the downtube Suntour Blaze components. And the Hard Rock Sport, though I would prefer to call it "robust," could also perhaps be described as a clunker. Which is to say:

4. There's almost always at least one nicer bike on the rack.

(Oh, and I leave the u-locks at work. They're heavy!)
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