Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Can I pick your brain?

Notices
Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Can I pick your brain?

Old 09-12-08, 05:35 PM
  #1  
jconnwsu
Member
Thread Starter
 
jconnwsu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 35

Bikes: '08 Surly Cross Check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Can I pick your brain?

Wondering if I could pick your brain a little. I have been reading a lot of threads here on the commuting forum. The advise here is really great! I have just started commuting this summer and have commuted several times. I really enjoy it! There is one issue that is keeping me from riding on a consistent basis though. I am just borrowing a bike right now that was in my mom's garage, and although it rides fairly well, it is definitely too small for me. I find that my back is sore, and my knees too, after I ride for a little while. This is where your advice comes in. I NEED A NEW BIKE!

A little about me and what the bike duty will be: I am about 6'-2" with long legs and arms, and have been looking in the 60cm range. The bike will be mostly for commuting and running errands as well as leisure rides with the wife. Definitely no racing and big speed and lightweight is not a big deal. I will be putting a rack and panniers on the bike for the commuting/errands. Possibly some group rides, but probably not many...the main focus is commuting. My commute is 23 miles or so round trip - one not so bad hill in the AM and one that isn't too fun on the ride home (haven't had to walk it!). Like I said, I have read a lot about different bikes here on BF, and I think that I have narrowed it down to just a couple. Here's the list (in order of my liking) with a little about what I think about each:

1) Surly Long Haul Trucker Complete- This seems like such a great "bang for the buck" bike. I like the idea of a triple because of the hills. It seems like a do all bike and when I rode it, it was a very smooth and comfortable ride. I also didn't find the bar-ends to be difficult to get used to either, so that's not an issue. On the negative side, people say that it is heavy and slow. Is this the only down side to this bike?

2) Surly Cross Check Complete - Another great bike that seems like a do-all. I don't think that the components seem as good as the LHT for only $100 less (I could be wrong). I have ridden one in one size too small. Rode out well and was smooth. It didn't seem like there was a big difference in handling responsiveness between this and the LHT. One thing that people point out as an upside to the CC is the ability to switch to a single speed or fixed gear. This doesn't interest me much, so I don't count it as a +.

3) Soma Double Cross - Just heard about this bike. Frame looks really nice and it looks like it would almost be a cross between the LHT and Cross Check. The one big downside is that it would be a custom build, not a complete driving the cost up. Do they sell completes? Anybody have any experience with this bike?

4) Kona Jake the Snake - I went to ride one, and a guy got there just before I did to take it out for a test ride. Does look like a pretty good bike, Aluminum, STI shifters and pretty good components. But it is a little more than the Surly's. What do you think?

I really appreciate your advise and opinions, I am looking forward to hearing what you have to say. All opinions are welcome. Thanks in advance and happy riding!
jconnwsu is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 05:51 PM
  #2  
paulwwalters
beatz down lo|seatz up hi
 
paulwwalters's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 1,062

Bikes: A 2007 Trek 4300. 22.5", 1981 Trek 610 24" (61cm)

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I say the Kona just for the STI. Otherwise the CrossCheck. I don't know much about the Soma, but I can tell you the LHT is beefy... as in seat stays the size of re-bar. Unless you're doing serious touring or hauling I'd say it's pretty unnecessary.
paulwwalters is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 06:54 PM
  #3  
AdamD
Biker, Lover, Fighter
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: The LBC, CA
Posts: 414

Bikes: My own hand built frames

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
If you can afford a little more than those stock bikes you could also consider having a local shop you trust build a bike up for you. I opted to have my local shop build me a Cross Check with better components than the Cross Check complete from Surly has and I'm absolutely in love with it. It cost me a good $500-600 more than the stock Surly but I was able to pick and choose exactly what I wanted. It sounds as is fit/setup might be an issue for you so having a local shop to do a pro fitting for you is worth its weight in gold if you ask me, after all cycling is no fun if you're sore as you well know. Now get off the Internet and go build a relationship with a local shop you trust.
AdamD is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 07:59 PM
  #4  
mnaines
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Kansas City, Kansas, AKA The Heart of America
Posts: 92

Bikes: Diamondback Windwood Citi

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I have a 2007 Diamondback Wildwood Citi bicycle - 20" frame, 24" wheels with 21-speed gripshift and linear brake system. I stand about 6'3" tall, so the 32" height from the ground to the seat fits me almost perfectly. Keep in mind also that when "fitting" a bike, here is the rule of thumb: When sitting comfortably in the saddle, your feet should sit flat on the ground with your legs outstretched and knees barely bent but not locked. The bike is a hybrid between a comfort and a cruiser, built primarily for recreational cruises while providing the necessary comfort for long distances. Front fork and seatpost-mounted suspension come standard and provide a noticeable improvement in comfort compared to fixed-frame bicycles. Luggage rack is optional, but not included. Definitely worth checking out.
mnaines is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 08:29 PM
  #5  
J.C. Koto
apocryphal sobriquet
 
J.C. Koto's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Star City, NE
Posts: 1,083

Bikes: 2008 Surly Long Haul Trucker "The Truckerino"

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)
Liked 3 Times in 2 Posts
:
J.C. Koto is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 08:59 PM
  #6  
BCRider
Senior Member
 
BCRider's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Location: The 'Wack, BC, Canada
Posts: 5,547

Bikes: Norco (2), Miyata, Canondale, Soma, Redline

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
Liked 41 Times in 31 Posts
From what you say your goals are the Crosscheck is what I'd suggest. BUT IN THE RIGHT SIZE! If you get one a size too small then sure, you can use a longer seat post. But then it's a reach to the bars and that gets old REAL quick if you're not a performace riding maniac.

Or perhaps the Kona if you like it more. Test ride them both and decide. The LHT is also an excellent bike but unless you're got oversize feet and could use the extra pannier to heel clearance it is a little bit of overkill. It's also a little heavier and has a longer wheelbase. I know you say you don't care about weight but a bike that is a few lbs lighter DOES feel more sporty under you even if you don't blaze around at higher speeds all the time or even at all. Also the shorter wheelbase of the cyclocross bikes over the LHT results in slightly snappier steering for a more sporty feel to the bike.


I recently got a Soma for myself but I'm into building up my own bikes so the extra work and potential extra cost didn't faze me at all. But in your case go with the CrossCheck. Buying a complete bike will always be far, far cheaper than buying a frame and all new parts. The only way a frame purchase works out is if you do the work yourself and get all the stuff either used or from closeouts.

And since it's local, at least that's my understanding from your post, the shop can work with you in the short term to play with stems. For new bike purchases this is usually a direct or cost difference swap for the first couple of weeks. At least that's what my own LBS has for a polity. Go for one that lifts the tops of the drop bars to the same height as the saddle and has a decent but not too short or too long reach. You'll find that this works pretty good for less than a racy pace and the drops for us "normal" out of shape folks are useable when fighting a headwind but not so far down that we're bent double and can't lift our heads to see and can't breath because we're doing a swiss army knife impression.... YMMV on this whole stem height deal but don't be afraid to start that high and see how you do.

As you get into the riding more and get into better shape you may want to go with a more aggresive posture. But that's for later. We all went through this "growth" and swapping parts as we go through these changes is part of the fun.

As for your choice options there isn't a loser in the lot. As long as the Kona has eyelets for fenders and rack they are all excellent choices.

Last edited by BCRider; 09-12-08 at 09:03 PM.
BCRider is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 09:41 PM
  #7  
tballx
Count Dorkula
 
tballx's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Edmonds, WA
Posts: 179

Bikes: 2008 Specialized Tricross Sport

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Have you tried the Specialized Tri Cross? We seem to have similar uses for a bike and ride in a similar climate. After I added some All Condition Armadillos to mine, I was totally satisfied. In a wet climate, it is also really nice to have v-brakes that actually work with drop bars straight from the factory.
tballx is offline  
Old 09-12-08, 09:59 PM
  #8  
balindamood
Wrench Savant
 
balindamood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: 61 Degrees North
Posts: 2,291

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 41 Post(s)
Liked 66 Times in 29 Posts
All are good choices, but have their own unique features. Ride all of them, pick one. You really cannot go too wrong with any of them.
balindamood is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 11:26 AM
  #9  
jconnwsu
Member
Thread Starter
 
jconnwsu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 35

Bikes: '08 Surly Cross Check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks for all your responses and advice. I still want to ride the Kona and give it a go. I am leaning against the Soma for that very reason, that it would be quite a bit more $$ up front and being a new rider don't know exactly what I want for everything yet. The frame did look intriguing though. Any other thoughts about the other three? It would be nice to hear from some owners of each to see how they like them. Thanks again!
jconnwsu is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 11:52 AM
  #10  
Hot Potato
Senior Member
 
Hot Potato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Western Chicagoland
Posts: 1,824
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Cyclocross and touring bikes make pretty good all around bikes. Consider other touring bikes besides the surly. Jamis Aurora, Fuji touring are both around $800 with STI shifters. The Tri-cross is more expensive, lighter, and a really good all around bike as well. I have no experience with Surly LHT, other than I passed up buying a complete one because of the bar end shifters.

O own a tri-cross and an Aurora. Very satisfied with both.
Hot Potato is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 12:58 PM
  #11  
ncscott
cyclist
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: vermont
Posts: 352

Bikes: road bike, mountain bike, touring bike

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Why no love for bar ends? I have used STI's for many years and have no issues with bar ends. You can have both and enjoy them both. Regarding your bikes...
I have the LHT complete for my commuter bike. I do not travel very far and have a lightweight road bike for faster trips. The LHT is a heavy bike. You would be better served with a lighter weight bike if this is your only bike. Not all bikes have braze ons, check with that. Don't forget to save money for details like a lock, racks, helmet, gloves, panniers, lights, etc, etc...
Scott
ncscott is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 01:01 PM
  #12  
joninkrakow
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 222

Bikes: '86 Koga Miyata Randonneur

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jconnwsu View Post
2) Surly Cross Check Complete -

Just reading the specs of this bike on the net, I have one problem with this bike over the LHT. The chainstays are something like 42 or 43 cm. If you want to carry panniers on a rack, my experience is that 44 or beter, 45cm is the minimum to not have your heels constantly hitting the panniers. I have 45cm on my bike, and have my panniers all the way back on my rack, and I still connect on bigger bumps, and this past Friday, the connection led to my bag snagging the spokes--quite scary, IMO. I would make sure that whatever bike you get gives you ample clearance there--I'm about 6'2" myself, with something like a 36" PBH (inseam). However, I do think my cranks are 175mm, which probably doesn't help. I suppose shorter cranks would help here. In any case, it's something to consider....

-Jon
joninkrakow is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 01:24 PM
  #13  
bragi
bragi
 
bragi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: seattle, WA
Posts: 2,911

Bikes: LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Like others have said, all the bikes you've mentioned are pretty good ones. You might also check out the Jamis Aurora; it has slightly lower-end components than some of those others, but it's also less expensive.

I have the LHT, which I bought as-is, and it's a good bike for me; I tour a little, and I don't have a car, so it's nice to have a bike that can handle groceries and big bags of books. It is heavy, and you'd never want to race it, but it's plenty fast enough for commuting.

One thing to consider before your purchase is the comfort advantage of steel over aluminum. Aluminum is very rigid and not very springy. Steel gives a bit more, and, especially on longer rides, is easier on the rider.
bragi is offline  
Old 09-14-08, 02:48 PM
  #14  
Hot Potato
Senior Member
 
Hot Potato's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Western Chicagoland
Posts: 1,824
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Why no love for bar end shifters? Personal preference, that's all.
Hot Potato is offline  
Old 10-01-08, 04:18 PM
  #15  
jconnwsu
Member
Thread Starter
 
jconnwsu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 35

Bikes: '08 Surly Cross Check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Just wanted to give you all an update. I went down to the LBS (Seven Corners in Portland) that I had been to a couple times looking at Surly's on Saturday. I called and made sure that they had a 60cm Cross Check in stock, and they did. I also decided to test ride the Bianchi Volpe, as a shop had one in a 61cm in stock. I went and rode the Cross Check first, and it rode really well. They had the stem flipped, lowering the bars, and they said that they could flip it if necessary. It felt just a hair long of a reach, where if it was flipped it would be pretty dead on. I talked with the guys there about the component difference on the Cross Check and the Long Haul Trucker, and how they were more than the $100 difference if I were to upgrade at some point. This left me questioning again. So I asked a question that I was 99% sure was going to be a "no." I asked if it was possible for them to have a Cross Check frame with Trucker components (drive-train and wheels), suggesting that I would pay the Trucker price. At this point he asked the owner of the shop, and to my surprise he said "whatever you want man," patting me on the back. I was so excited. I still wanted to ride the Volpe though, as it was $200 less, so I told them I had one more bike to ride and that I would let them know what I wanted to do. So I rode the Volpe, and it fit really well. But the service at the shop I went to was sub-par, and I didn't like the STI as much as I thought (maybe just not used to it) and the components didn't seem as "rugged" as those of the Trucker. So I went back to Seven Corners and told them that I wanted to order the Cross Check in black with the Trucker components. They were still a go. So they got it ordered and it should be in and ready to go early next week! I am stoked! I will post a picture as soon as it's in my possession. Thank you all again for your advice, it was very helpful. PS. you can read my experience with Seven Corners here.
jconnwsu is offline  
Old 10-01-08, 04:31 PM
  #16  
El Pelon
dia por dia
 
El Pelon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Diego
Posts: 300

Bikes: hand built fixie, Lightspeed Sienna D/A

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jconnwsu View Post
Just wanted to give you all an update. I went down to the LBS (Seven Corners in Portland) that I had been to a couple times looking at Surly's on Saturday. I called and made sure that they had a 60cm Cross Check in stock, and they did. I also decided to test ride the Bianchi Volpe, as a shop had one in a 61cm in stock. I went and rode the Cross Check first, and it rode really well. They had the stem flipped, lowering the bars, and they said that they could flip it if necessary. It felt just a hair long of a reach, where if it was flipped it would be pretty dead on. I talked with the guys there about the component difference on the Cross Check and the Long Haul Trucker, and how they were more than the $100 difference if I were to upgrade at some point. This left me questioning again. So I asked a question that I was 99% sure was going to be a "no." I asked if it was possible for them to have a Cross Check frame with Trucker components (drive-train and wheels), suggesting that I would pay the Trucker price. At this point he asked the owner of the shop, and to my surprise he said "whatever you want man," patting me on the back. I was so excited. I still wanted to ride the Volpe though, as it was $200 less, so I told them I had one more bike to ride and that I would let them know what I wanted to do. So I rode the Volpe, and it fit really well. But the service at the shop I went to was sub-par, and I didn't like the STI as much as I thought (maybe just not used to it) and the components didn't seem as "rugged" as those of the Trucker. So I went back to Seven Corners and told them that I wanted to order the Cross Check in black with the Trucker components. They were still a go. So they got it ordered and it should be in and ready to go early next week! I am stoked! I will post a picture as soon as it's in my possession. Thank you all again for your advice, it was very helpful. PS. you can read my experience with Seven Corners here.
Fantastic! Make sure to continue to give them referrals, etc. A good LBS is a gold mine, and keeping them in business is in YOUR best interest.
El Pelon is offline  
Old 10-01-08, 04:36 PM
  #17  
MonthOLDpickle
Relatively Newbie
 
MonthOLDpickle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Washington State
Posts: 62

Bikes: Trek 7100 Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
What was the total price if you don't mind? I live in Seattle, WA and drive to Eugene, OR to see my GF. I am looking to buy a second (or replace) my current bike. If there is a messaging system here we can do it through that and discuss.

~Pickle
MonthOLDpickle is offline  
Old 10-01-08, 10:17 PM
  #18  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 13,980

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 465 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2743 Post(s)
Liked 2,324 Times in 955 Posts
One thing I would suggest you consider is going with the Cross Check cassette over the LHT cassette. They're basically the same level, so it shouldn't affect the price much, and I'm sure they'd be able to swap it up until the time you take it out the door.

The LHT 11-34 cassette is picked with touring in mind. If you need to climb a hill after five or six hours of riding, it's the one you want. The trade-off is that the gears are spaced wider, and it takes more effort to get up to cadence in each gear. The 12-25 cassette spec'd for the Cross Check is much better for a daily commute.

I've used both a 12-25 and an 11-32 on my Kona Jake, and I like the 12-25 much better for commuting. I bought the 11-32 for a century, and it was great for that, but it feels sluggish for the stop and go of commuting.

Either way, you're ending up with one sweet bike.
Andy_K is offline  
Old 10-01-08, 11:07 PM
  #19  
unicedmeman
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Patterson Park
Posts: 40

Bikes: LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Is the LHT really much slower than the cross check? I currently have an old mountain bike with 26" x 1.75" tires on it, I'm assuming that both surlys would be "faster" than it?

Also, I have large size 13 feet. If I was to buy a cross check I would be unable to mount panniers without dangerous heel strike?
unicedmeman is offline  
Old 10-02-08, 10:29 AM
  #20  
unicedmeman
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Patterson Park
Posts: 40

Bikes: LHT

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
anyone?
unicedmeman is offline  
Old 10-02-08, 11:16 AM
  #21  
AndrewP
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Montreal
Posts: 6,521

Bikes: Peugeot Hybrid, Minelli Hybrid

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 2 Times in 2 Posts
If you want a triple the Kona Jake would suit you better than a Jake the Snake, although it has lower level components. The Specialized Tr-Cross is also good.
AndrewP is offline  
Old 10-02-08, 12:27 PM
  #22  
uciflylow
Still on two wheels!
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: West Tennessee
Posts: 988
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I ride the LHT every work day for a 28 mile commute. It is set up with bar end shifting as a preference. I also have a road bike with STI for fast rides. Each shifting type has it's place and preference. Personaly, bar cons would work for most people in most situations except race day.
I love my LHT, plenty of space for what size tires you choose and fenders, comfortable and tough. I also do short tours, loaded longer tours and have ridden it on Monday night club rides, just for the extra effort I need to keep up with the fellas I ride with (there sorta slackers).
The best bike for you is definatly the one that you are comfortable on, fits, and you think the most of!
uciflylow is offline  
Old 10-02-08, 12:42 PM
  #23  
jconnwsu
Member
Thread Starter
 
jconnwsu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Vancouver, WA
Posts: 35

Bikes: '08 Surly Cross Check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I will probably stick with the triple for now. I was talking with the owner on tuesday and he said that not 2 hours after I told them to go ahead with my order, that a guy came in wanting a Surly Travelers Check built with the Cross Check set up. Pretty cool how it worked out.
jconnwsu is offline  
Old 10-02-08, 12:55 PM
  #24  
climbhoser
Senior Member
 
climbhoser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Parker, CO
Posts: 1,654

Bikes: SS Surly Crosscheck; '91 Cannondale 3.0

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jconnwsu View Post
I will probably stick with the triple for now. I was talking with the owner on tuesday and he said that not 2 hours after I told them to go ahead with my order, that a guy came in wanting a Surly Travelers Check built with the Cross Check set up. Pretty cool how it worked out.

Mut have been meant to be!

As for the bar-ends, I dunno, I like 'em tons better than STI. BUT, and a big but, I would have done the Soma with SRAM rival stuff.

IF you ever get sick of your bar end shifters seriously consider getting Campagnolo Ergo 9 speed levers and paing it with an 8 speed cassette and the XT rear der. you already have. It's a sweet setup, and WAY better than Shimano STI. I'll take bar ends any day over STI junk.
climbhoser is offline  
Old 10-02-08, 03:30 PM
  #25  
sauerwald
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: San Jose, CA
Posts: 1,840

Bikes: Bianchi San Remo - set up as a utility bike, Peter Mooney Road bike, Peter Mooney commute bike,Dahon Folder,Schwinn Paramount Tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
A few people in here have suggested STI shifters - I am less sold on STI for a commuter bike. I have a fun bike which is very lightweight, and has a 10 speed campy ergo drivetrain - great for recreational rides or centuries, but my commuter is a workhorse - it is built on a touring bike frame, has rack, fenders etc. The shifter for the rder is a barcon, non-indexed. Shifts are fast and easy. I have the ability to shift my chainring too, although unless very heavily loaded, I rarely move that - and the control for the fder is a downtube shifter, once again, not indexed. For a commute bike, weight and speed of shifting are not nearly as important as reliability and ease of repair - for that, old school is the best.
sauerwald is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.