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Newbie Tire ?

Old 11-20-08, 03:20 AM
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Dtuns
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Newbie Tire ?

Im looking for some winter tires for my commuter I have 700 c wheels someone told me I should get some cyclocross tires for winter can anyone make any recomendations? I was looking at tires on ebay and noticed some said clincher whats this mean? Thanks in advance
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Old 11-20-08, 03:27 AM
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Clincher tyres are the normal type. The ones to be wary of are tubular tyres which are effectively a tube and tyre in one unit that is glued onto a shallow rim.

As far as what to get, I can't answer that because our winters are rather mild affairs. However, judging by what I've read on here, you'll need to tell the forum exactly what you'll be riding on - snow, ice, mud or just very wet asphalt.

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Old 11-20-08, 04:13 PM
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I live in Portland Oregon area so a lots of rain on the road little snow and Ice I figured I wouldn't ride if theres ice.
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Old 11-20-08, 05:15 PM
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So it really won't matter if snow and ice aren't part of the equation. Just get a good tire like the Panaracer Pasela TG and be on your way.
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Old 11-20-08, 05:21 PM
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Cyclocross tires would have knobby tread for going through the mud. One would assume it would help in the snow as well. I used to ride a motorcycle on knobbies through the snow when I was young(er) and stupid(er); they did pretty well. If you will only be in the dry/rain on pavement, then the knobby tread will only slow you down.
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Old 11-20-08, 05:54 PM
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Yes, any good hybrid tire will do you well if you are not going to ride in snow or ice. IMHO I want a flat resistant tire. No-one wants to sit on the side of the road changing a flat especially in the rain. I have Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires and (knock on wood) have not had a flat in years and thousands of miles. They are heavy but I haven't found that to be a hindrance in speed.

Cyclocross tires will drain your energy on pavement.
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Old 11-20-08, 06:27 PM
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Before anyone makes too much in recomendations, it would be nice to know what you're riding. Not all bikes can take a much different tire. I know my Lemond will top out at a 25mm due to insufficient width between the chainstays at the BB.

-R
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Old 11-20-08, 06:44 PM
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I'm using the Vittoria Randonneur - a very sure footed tyre on wet roads and gravel and not bad on dry roads either. A good all round tyre.

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Old 11-21-08, 03:34 AM
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Im riding a Gary Fisher wingra it has a 700 x 32 on it know bontraegers. Does anyone here ride on icey days? Im not worried about cold but crashes

Last edited by Dtuns; 11-21-08 at 03:49 AM.
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Old 11-21-08, 03:40 AM
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Originally Posted by riddei View Post
Yes, any good hybrid tire will do you well if you are not going to ride in snow or ice. IMHO I want a flat resistant tire. No-one wants to sit on the side of the road changing a flat especially in the rain. I have Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires and (knock on wood) have not had a flat in years and thousands of miles. They are heavy but I haven't found that to be a hindrance in speed.

Cyclocross tires will drain your energy on pavement.
Tell me about it - I had loaned a friend my other road bike and was riding my cyclocross bike with him. I was getting worked to say the least. As for the cyclocross tires, I'd not worry about them unless your riding off pavement (where they become quite a bit more useful).
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Old 11-21-08, 03:48 AM
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ice: studs
powder snow: aggressive and deep tread pattern
hard packed: wide, aggressive and deep tread pattern
slush: narrow, aggressive tread pattern
etc.

that being said, a good set of winter studded tyres from schwalbe or nokian will set you back for around $100/pair, so unless those CX tyres are cheaper than that and you don't expect any ice at all during your commute, there's not much down side to just having winter specific tyres.
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Old 11-21-08, 09:59 AM
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In PDX, I'd go with europa's suggestion of the Vittoria Randonneur if you're not planning to ride when things ice over.

I'm up in Seattle, and I ride Ultra Gatorskins right up until the snow falls. Then I switch to the studs, because riding on hardpack slush/ice is scary without them.
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Old 11-21-08, 10:17 AM
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Originally Posted by Dtuns View Post
I live in Portland Oregon area so a lots of rain on the road little snow and Ice I figured I wouldn't ride if theres ice.
Read, people, READ! No Ice or snow! NONE!

Dtuns, for wet or dry pavement, the safest choice is to use regular slick road tires. That's what gives you the most rubber on the road.

There are a zillion brands to choose from. Buy the ones that look purty and you can afford.
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Old 11-21-08, 10:37 AM
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Originally Posted by Dtuns View Post
I live in Portland Oregon area so a lots of rain on the road little snow and Ice I figured I wouldn't ride if theres ice.
Originally Posted by Roody View Post
Read, people, READ! No Ice or snow! NONE!
Who needs to read?

Dtuns said he won't ride in the ice, and that there is little snow on the ground; not "NONE!" I live just north of PDX up in Seattle, I know what the weather is like up here. Yeah, the rain is the big thing to contend with, but when there is snow, there's a separate factor to contend with around here... Due to the fisheries being such a huge industry around this area, there are very strict EPA regulations regarding snow handling. That means NO ROAD SALT.
Back in the midwest (I moved out here from Ohio) there was no problem with upwards of 12" - 15" of snow in a single dumping because the cities start rolling out the plows and salt trucks when the flakes start falling. Out here, 6" of snow can shut down the city for a week: We don't have a fleet of plows due to the infrequency of the snowfall, and we can't use salt to melt the snow. A 1" midwest 'dusting' turns into an icy sheen within a couple hours as everyone drives and compacts it.
Compounding the lack of snow removal are the standard traction methods the city uses to combat the snow: Sand and Cinders. When the snow does finally melt, you're left with road surfaces covered in an eighth inch layer of loose sand/cinder. That's where a hardpack CX tire with a light 'nubby' tread or a deep road tread like the Randonneur becomes helpful in gaining some grip versus a totally slick tire like the Gatorskins I use.
Slicks are good for most of the year up in the PNW, but when the snow starts falling down at sea level, a light tread isn't a bad idea.
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Old 11-21-08, 08:28 PM
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Thanks for the advice I wasn,t aware that you could get studded bike tires I just might give the ice a go.
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Old 11-21-08, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
Back in the midwest (I moved out here from Ohio) there was no problem with upwards of 12" - 15" of snow in a single dumping because the cities start rolling out the plows and salt trucks when the flakes start falling.
Wow. You Ohio people are tough. Here in Michigan, 12 to 15 inches of new snow would cause some problems.
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Old 11-21-08, 08:47 PM
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Originally Posted by CliftonGK1 View Post
Who needs to read?

Dtuns said he won't ride in the ice, and that there is little snow on the ground; not "NONE!" I live just north of PDX up in Seattle, I know what the weather is like up here. Yeah, the rain is the big thing to contend with, but when there is snow, there's a separate factor to contend with around here... Due to the fisheries being such a huge industry around this area, there are very strict EPA regulations regarding snow handling. That means NO ROAD SALT.
Back in the midwest (I moved out here from Ohio) there was no problem with upwards of 12" - 15" of snow in a single dumping because the cities start rolling out the plows and salt trucks when the flakes start falling. Out here, 6" of snow can shut down the city for a week: We don't have a fleet of plows due to the infrequency of the snowfall, and we can't use salt to melt the snow. A 1" midwest 'dusting' turns into an icy sheen within a couple hours as everyone drives and compacts it.
Compounding the lack of snow removal are the standard traction methods the city uses to combat the snow: Sand and Cinders. When the snow does finally melt, you're left with road surfaces covered in an eighth inch layer of loose sand/cinder. That's where a hardpack CX tire with a light 'nubby' tread or a deep road tread like the Randonneur becomes helpful in gaining some grip versus a totally slick tire like the Gatorskins I use.
Slicks are good for most of the year up in the PNW, but when the snow starts falling down at sea level, a light tread isn't a bad idea
.
It surprises me that a lot of people "gear up" for less than a foot of snow a year. That's a pretty trivial amount.
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Old 11-22-08, 09:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Roody View Post
It surprises me that a lot of people "gear up" for less than a foot of snow a year. That's a pretty trivial amount.
I think last year we had a whopping 4' all winter up here on the ridge, and down at sea-level it was usually just rain. My extent of gearing up meant putting on the ice studs and finding my balaclava. Now, the people out here who live above 700' elevation have every reason to gear up for winter. When the snow level drops, people at 1000' to 1500' can get as much as 14' or 15' of snow, and the higher elevations (2000' and up) might get 1' - 2' almost every night for 3 solid months.

What I can't imagine is going back to the extremes of riding in midwest winters with temperatures in the negative double digits when you figure in the windchill. At least out here when it's really cold, that means it only dropped into the low 20s.
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