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speed difference between road bike and city/hybrid bike

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speed difference between road bike and city/hybrid bike

Old 01-27-09, 12:42 PM
  #26  
Sirrus Rider
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Originally Posted by fuzz2050 View Post
Not really, take it from someone who has far too many touring bikes, there are substantial differences. The chainstays on my trek 620 are something like 6 cm longer than a Sirrus, with the corresponding increase in wheelbase. It also has a lot less trail, making it a much more stable ride. Also, a shorter top tube, allowing for a more comfortable fit doing long distances, or maybe just the ability to run drop handlebars.

Sorry, different beasts entirely, but your right, they do both have braze ons, an big tires.
I agree to disagree as the top tube on my Sirrus is perfect for both flat bars and drops and the drop conversion is a common one for Sirruses.
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Old 01-27-09, 01:43 PM
  #27  
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Originally Posted by CCrew View Post
And front suspension.

Not bashing either, but slapping a rack and panniers on a road bike if you have to carry stuff is like putting a luggage rack on a Ferrari. Yeah, my road bike is about 3mph faster, at the cost of having to carry stuff in a backpack, and a much harsher ride on 23mm versus 36mm on my commuter.


-Roger
I use a rack and panniers on my road bike. Yes the ride is harsher, yes panniers may look silly. But hey, it gets me from A to B faster and the drops mean my wrists don't hurt while riding.

If you haven't considered drop handlebars, then definately take some for a test ride. It takes a while to get used to them, but I can't use flat bars now, drops are so much more comfortable and get you in a decent aero position for the headwinds!
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Old 01-27-09, 02:54 PM
  #28  
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You can get some "faster" tires on hybrids. Mine are 35x700c at 90-95psi. It rolls great, but as some people have pointed out, a headwind will make you late for work if you're set up to be upright all the way
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Old 01-27-09, 03:12 PM
  #29  
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yes tx is a windy mofo with flat bars it sucks getting windblasted
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Old 01-27-09, 03:34 PM
  #30  
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There two types of hybrids, comfort and training (aggressive), the Sirrus fills the later category.

A comfort hybrid will position you more upright and yet shoud have a headset permitting you to lower or extend forward for stretched out position.

The hybrid should also provide you the speed as you experienced on the MTB. With 700 / 35 or 38 tires you will have a solid ride and as many touring bikes provide. My 700 - 38 are rated to 100 psi and roll smooth with function tread for a variety of pathways. Many hybrids often have triples with 48 tooth as the largest front.

On road bikes the drop style bars provide more hand positions, also allow you to position your upper body lower if head winds or climbs are encountered. Also the front gear may sport 50 or more tooth gear, and the difference is noticeable.

If you carry much or your ride. examine the frame and confirm your options for rack (s) and ease of loading for balanced ride.

Saddle style should also be considered. Many road bikes are fitted with narrow saddles, if not comfortable on the test ride, you will not be happy on the commute. The same with the hybrid, depending on model and setup.

My son took delivery of a large frame MTB last summer, and could not get comfortable, went back and found the saddle was to narrow, added cost to his bike was another $50 for proper saddle.

Yes, try before you buy.

All the best...
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Old 01-27-09, 03:40 PM
  #31  
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17 miles each way ... : I started with a mountain bike, then put on big fat 2" slicks. 50 minutes flat for varied terrain on NE roads. Switched to hybrid with 700c wheels thinking it would be faster. It wasn't. It added 10 minutes. Switched to an old road bike which felt faster but wasn't, same 10 minutes as the hybrid. I'm working on getting that MTB back on the road - that's my pick. Buy a nice used one for $100 and put slicks on it. Just my opinion.
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Old 01-28-09, 11:20 AM
  #32  
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After reading all posts I have decided on cyclocross 2008 Giant TCX 1.

It is not that I have any special preference to brand and model, but that I can get it new for $700 in LBS. Is it good bike for the price. I test rode it and it felt nice.

https://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...CX+1&Type=bike
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Old 01-28-09, 12:37 PM
  #33  
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That Gary Fisher will be pretty fast, especially if you flip the stem or something like that to approximate a more aggressive position. Other than the flat bars, it will proablaby not ride much different than a comfort road bike. I have 2 road bikes and a cyclocross bike, but my fully rigid (much like the GF) mountain bike is almost just as fast with skinny tires (and it is FREAKIN HEAVY). Seriously, though.....you might consider dropping as much weight on the bike as you can since you have to climb home for so long every day.

The position and geometry is what makes a bike fast (tires and gearing being equal). Go with the bike that you LOVE to ride. The one you dream about at night. The one you think about in the shower....wait....scratch that.

Last edited by Sawtooth; 01-28-09 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 01-28-09, 02:14 PM
  #34  
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Check out the new Kona Dew Drop. It's a hybrid (part of Kona's Dew series) but with drop bars. It ranks fairly high on my "Next Bike to Buy" list.
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Old 01-28-09, 03:39 PM
  #35  
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It depends on your riding position, mostly. If you are positioned efficiently on either kind of bike, you will go faster for less effort.
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Old 01-28-09, 03:42 PM
  #36  
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No need to choose - if you want a road bike just buy one with clearance for larger tires.

Originally Posted by CCrew View Post
Not bashing either, but slapping a rack and panniers on a road bike if you have to carry stuff is like putting a luggage rack on a Ferrari. Yeah, my road bike is about 3mph faster, at the cost of having to carry stuff in a backpack, and a much harsher ride on 23mm versus 36mm on my commuter.
You're confusing road bike with road racing bike. They're rarer than they used to be but you can still find road bikes that'll take wide tires. e.g.:



IIRC it'll take a 38mm

Last edited by GV27; 01-28-09 at 03:49 PM.
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Old 01-28-09, 04:04 PM
  #37  
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oops.. delete for double post
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Old 01-28-09, 04:06 PM
  #38  
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Originally Posted by Sirrus Rider View Post
The Sirrus has no front suspension.
But the Sirrus isn't technically a hybrid either. Specialized categorizes it as a "fitness/commute" bike. All it really is is a flat bar road bike, not a hybrid. Compare to the FX line in Trek. It's really nothing more than a road bike for people that don't want drops.

It has a road crankset and majoritively road components. The only real "hybrid" in the Specialized line is the Crosstrail.
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Old 01-28-09, 04:53 PM
  #39  
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Flat bar road bikes are made for the uninformed, inexperienced and bull-headed. But that aside, there's nothing inherently faster about a road bike except the riding position. You can replicate that riding position on any bike, except for the drops. Of course, you can't compare a big, fat, knobby-tired, suspended mountain bike or comfort bike that weighs 30-35 lbs with any bike that uses more suitable road-type tires and weighs 20-25 lbs.
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Old 01-28-09, 05:35 PM
  #40  
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Part of my post did not show up as I put it in the title. Anyway, I found cyclocross bike 2008 Giant TCX 1. It is brand new and with tax in LBS is $700. Is it good bike and price?

https://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...CX+1&Type=bike
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Old 01-28-09, 09:58 PM
  #41  
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Good buy, but does it have the mounting points for rack and fenders at the rear drop-outs and seat stays. If it doesnt you can use P clips from the hardware store. People talk down the Sora shifters but they work well, and give easy upshifting from the hoods as you accelerate away at traffic lights. When you are up to speed you can move down onto the drops.
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Old 01-28-09, 11:15 PM
  #42  
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Originally Posted by Sirrus Rider View Post
I agree to disagree as the top tube on my Sirrus is perfect for both flat bars and drops and the drop conversion is a common one for Sirruses.
There is a 2.5 cm difference in top tube length, not major, but something to be taken into account, especially as converting to drop bars add about 7 cm to reach as it is. I'm not saying that it can't be done, but you must admit, there are substantial differences in the geometries of a touring bike and your Sirrus.
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Old 01-29-09, 06:29 AM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by xxgrzesx View Post
Part of my post did not show up as I put it in the title. Anyway, I found cyclocross bike 2008 Giant TCX 1. It is brand new and with tax in LBS is $700. Is it good bike and price?

https://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...CX+1&Type=bike
For my uses, those wheels are nervousmaking. But I'm 170lbs, and it's not unheard of for me to load my bike up with 40-55lbs of groceries in panniers. For those kinds of loads, it's a good idea to have at least 32 spokes. If you don't ever hit the clyde cutoff, it might be a decent wheelset. Might be decent even then... doing a search in the clyde forum to see if there are any clydes who've tried it is a good idea.

I would really focus on bikes where you can get a test ride. If you've put in serious miles on only one or two bikes, it's pretty hard to just know what geometry fits and doesn't fit. When I was shopping for bikes, there were 3 standouts in terms of fit... a 20" wheel Dahon folder, a 700C tourer, and the Breezer I ended up with. Since I had that kind of choice, I narrowed it down based on the kinds of things I normally do and I ended up with a bike that suits me very well.
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Old 01-29-09, 07:58 AM
  #44  
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Originally Posted by Longfemur View Post
Flat bar road bikes are made for the uninformed, inexperienced and bull-headed.


How'd you miss the other flat-bar thread?
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Old 01-29-09, 08:17 AM
  #45  
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Originally Posted by Longfemur View Post
Flat bar road bikes are made for the uninformed, inexperienced and bull-headed. But that aside, there's nothing inherently faster about a road bike except the riding position. You can replicate that riding position on any bike, except for the drops. Of course, you can't compare a big, fat, knobby-tired, suspended mountain bike or comfort bike that weighs 30-35 lbs with any bike that uses more suitable road-type tires and weighs 20-25 lbs.

Not true! Flat bars are a HUGE help for someone with physical problems, or those of us who appreciate a better do it all bike.....

People with blinders on, are truly uninformed!
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Old 01-29-09, 10:09 AM
  #46  
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Ah, the Albatross, North Road, Mustache, etc. bars are so under appreciated. There are two types of cyclists in this world - flat and dropped. Then there's the weirdos like me.

That being said, I fail to see the point of a flat bar being better for a "do it all bike". How are ya gonna "do it all" when you're locked into one position.
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Old 01-29-09, 10:14 AM
  #47  
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