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Does anyone hate their touring bike for commuting?

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Does anyone hate their touring bike for commuting?

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Old 02-18-09, 06:58 PM
  #1  
InTheRain
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Does anyone hate their touring bike for commuting?

I guess the reason I ask this is because I commute on my touring bike and I love it! I've also commuted on a carbon fiber road bike (i love this more if I don't have to haul anything... which is rarely), an aluminum road bike (fast, but uncomfortable... i feel every pebble), and a hybrid (my least favorite, very ineffecient, slow, heavy, and not a comfortable riding position.)

I generally recommend a touring bike or cyclocross bike to people that want a good bike to commute with but also is versatile enough to take on group rides, recreational rides, and light touring. If heavy touring is something that a rider would like to do... then I think I would steer clear of the cyclocross bike.

I'm just wondering... are their people out there that own touring bikes and wish they had never bought one to use as a commuter?
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Old 02-18-09, 07:51 PM
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I don't think you will find anybody that hates commuting on a Touring bike.

The only real down is the gearing that most are running you top out some if you live in a hilly area. The upside is in hilly areas you leave the weekend roadies going up the next hill when you can gear down, stay in the seat and power up the hill and they are left standing on the cranks trying to make enough power to make the hill.

I just upgraded my T700 to Brifters 9 speed and swapped the cranks from a 22/32/44 to a 26/39/48.....Not convinced I like it. I think the 22/32/44's will end up back on the bike. Just a better gear combo for normal day to day use. May have to get the spacers machined to work with the 9speed chain.

Now what I do seem to shy away from is commuting on my Crit bike. That booger is brutal to ride on expansion joints. I have fun on the local rail to trail where I can keep a steady pace but the 23's just transmit every pebble you hit right to the taint like slamming a curb.
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Old 02-18-09, 09:15 PM
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Hate is a strong word.

I purchased a Raleigh Sojourn a while back, which they call a touring bike, but is really an animal all its own. I enjoyed it to start with, but I moved shortly afterwards to a much hillier commute. The bike has since been relegated to rain duty, and was the go-to bike for our once in three years snow.

I know that i have a need for a bike with a rack and fenders, but this particular bike isn't the right fit for me. I can't pin it on any one thing though, it's just combination of several. I'm not a B17 fan, not a barcon fan, not a triple fan, dislike BB5 brakes (BB7 should be mandatory), the tires are wider than I prefer (though were great in the snow), and would love to drop a couple of pounds from the bike. None of these really have anything to do with it being a "touring" bike though.

As a general rule, I think that touring frames are a little more suitable for a commute than the cross frames everyone is buying. I, like so many here, ride cross bikes though. The main reason though is that that's just what I keep running across on ebay.

Were I having a frame custom-built, it would be more sport-touring than cross.
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Old 02-18-09, 09:21 PM
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I hate the fact that there has been so much salt on the road that the gear train on my touring bike/commuter is rusty. More ice today.
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Old 02-18-09, 09:38 PM
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I love commuting on my Surly LHT, i also love commuting on my hi-racer recumbent.... and I love commuting on my pure racing road bike. I love and enjoy those bikes for commuting, but for very different reasons and under different circumstances.
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Old 02-18-09, 09:57 PM
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I wouldn't want to commute on anything else.
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Old 02-18-09, 10:39 PM
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Since unsupported touring is a passion of mine, I hope this won't be too blasphemous, but commuting on my touring bike is just all right. When I ride it unloaded, or even with a light load, it feels stiff and sluggish. I sometimes feel like kicking my shoe in the seat stay and yell, "giddy up you ol' mule!!". On the other hand, commuting my road bike feels zippy and fast, like I'm flying (or it could also be called a 'light touring' bike, a Salsa Casseroll).
Now when I load it up the touring rig with 30 lbs of gear & water and head on an adventure, that's a different story, the ride livens up like it woke up from a long nap, the bike gets in a good mood, feels sprightly and fun, and I've got a smile a mile wide.

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Old 02-18-09, 10:50 PM
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I don't understand the differences between the different kinds of bikes. Can someone give an overview or point to some information I can read?
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Old 02-18-09, 11:18 PM
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Originally Posted by woodway View Post
I don't understand the differences between the different kinds of bikes. Can someone give an overview or point to some information I can read?
A touring bike is shaped like a road bike. It has drop bars and road bike geometry. the thing that distinguishes it as a touring bike is that it usually has "relaxed geometry". In other words, the rider is going to be a little more upright than on a sport/performance oriented bike. The bike will have a longer wheelbase and be set up to be able to ride comfortably for long distances and carry tons of stuff.
A race bike in comparison is going to have a significant drop from the saddle to the handlebars so that the rider is in a more bent-over position. The emphasis with a race bike is on aerodynamics and performance handling rather than rider comfort.
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Old 02-18-09, 11:29 PM
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Originally Posted by d2create View Post
I wouldn't want to commute on anything else.
I totally agree with this. If you have to carry anything more than a water bottle, a touring bike is an ideal commuter.
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Old 02-18-09, 11:32 PM
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I love commuting on my RM Sherpa 30... It is a great bike for commuting and running errands after work....
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Old 02-18-09, 11:36 PM
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I think I might be the only one, but I didn't really like commuting with my LHT when I had it.

I much prefer my current two bikes.
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Old 02-19-09, 07:34 AM
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I love mine but I have started thinking about a portable bike to travel with (travel with as in it's part of the luggage, not how I get there) and have extrapolated to wondering how that hypothetical lightweight bike might be to commute on vs my daily-driver tank.
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Old 02-19-09, 07:53 AM
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Originally Posted by HardyWeinberg View Post
I love mine but I have started thinking about a portable bike to travel with (travel with as in it's part of the luggage, not how I get there) and have extrapolated to wondering how that hypothetical lightweight bike might be to commute on vs my daily-driver tank.
Watch out! Those is some expensive thoughts your having. I started thinking along those lines a year and a half ago. Now I am $5000+ lighter with the perfect all weather commuter/ travel bike.
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Old 02-19-09, 08:03 AM
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Originally Posted by gear View Post
Watch out! Those is some expensive thoughts your having. I started thinking along those lines a year and a half ago. Now I am $5000+ lighter with the perfect all weather commuter/ travel bike.
Rule #7.5 of bikeforums.net: Never make a statement like that without posting links and pics.
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Old 02-19-09, 08:24 AM
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I'm seriously considering buying a touring bike for my "do it all" bike - camping, light touring (i.e. 3-4 day trip), and daily commuting, so this thread is really good to see! At this point, I'm kinda stuck between the gorgeous Masi Randonneur and the LHT. They seem rather similar as far as components and price...

Basically, I'm thinking about a bike that can be ridden in all weather, for rather long distances unsupported, yet will still be able to handle group rides and the occasional charity/distance ride (i.e. tour de cure, Hilly Hundred, etc)
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Old 02-19-09, 08:25 AM
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With my new place of employment and short, rolling commute, I've gone to using a lumbar pack instead of panniers, so my touring bike has been relegated to rainy day duty and I am using my old vintage Bianchi xcross bike for dry day commutes (and of course the damned snow bike for icy/snowy days like today). Sorry, but it's just a bit more fun to ride a lighter, faster, more responsive bike with brifters instead of barcons.

Of course this time of year, the weather still dictates the touring bike or snow bike most days...but spring is getting closer every day!
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Old 02-19-09, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by rugerben View Post
A touring bike is shaped like a road bike. It has drop bars and road bike geometry. the thing that distinguishes it as a touring bike is that it usually has "relaxed geometry". In other words, the rider is going to be a little more upright than on a sport/performance oriented bike. The bike will have a longer wheelbase and be set up to be able to ride comfortably for long distances and carry tons of stuff.
A race bike in comparison is going to have a significant drop from the saddle to the handlebars so that the rider is in a more bent-over position. The emphasis with a race bike is on aerodynamics and performance handling rather than rider comfort.
Other characteristics (generalizing a bit):

- As part of longer wheelbase, has longer chainstays (at least 17 inches long) so that you can put panniers on the back without hitting your heels on the panniers
- Brazed-on fittings for fenders, rear rack, front fenders.
- Frequently a brazed-on fitting on the front fork to fit a low-rider pannier
- Clearance for larger tires (at least 32c) plus fenders
- Fittings for at least two water bottles, sometimes three
- Often come stock with a triple chainring
- Typically have beefier, heavier rims - at least 32h hubs, more typically 36h
- Sturdier tubing used to stand up to carrying a load - the frame may end up weighing a pound or two more than a comparable quality road frame.


These are broad generalities - unfortunately some bikes marketed as "touring" bikes are not really great for touring....but they can still make for good commuters.

I specifically went for a touring bike to use as my commuter because they are great for another, entirely different purpose: touring.
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Old 02-19-09, 09:50 AM
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Originally Posted by BengeBoy View Post
Other characteristics (generalizing a bit):

- As part of longer wheelbase, has longer chainstays (at least 17 inches long) so that you can put panniers on the back without hitting your heels on the panniers
- Brazed-on fittings for fenders, rear rack, front fenders.
- Frequently a brazed-on fitting on the front fork to fit a low-rider pannier
- Clearance for larger tires (at least 32c) plus fenders
- Fittings for at least two water bottles, sometimes three
- Often come stock with a triple chainring
- Typically have beefier, heavier rims - at least 32h hubs, more typically 36h
- Sturdier tubing used to stand up to carrying a load - the frame may end up weighing a pound or two more than a comparable quality road frame.


These are broad generalities - unfortunately some bikes marketed as "touring" bikes are not really great for touring....but they can still make for good commuters.

I specifically went for a touring bike to use as my commuter because they are great for another, entirely different purpose: touring.
very good point. I was tired and in a hurry so I forgot to mention those things.

I have a touring bike. My C-dale T400 but it's way too nice for me to beat it up with every day commuting. Besides, i can't leave a Dale locked up outside the supermarket or whatever. it'd get stolen before I even get off the damn bike.

But I'm thinking that once a rocking Nashbar sale comes along, I'll buy this bad boy and build it up as my every day commuter. I'm thinking 9 speed cassette, with triple chainrings, and bar end shifters.

If I sell my Giant TranSend, i can probably fund it pretty easily as well.
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Old 02-19-09, 10:33 AM
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Okay I'll be the voice of prefer not to commute on my touring bike. When touring I want the drop bars, no question! But for my short urban commute I prefer flat bars. As well with touring I want clipless pedals. But for commuting I want the flexibility to just wear whatever shoes I'm going to wear at work or just go for errands in sandals, etc.

I also don't want to gum up my nice touring bike with salt in the winter. And am a bit paranoid of locking my nice bike up in urban vandalism and other mayhem land. But I have commuted on it before (its great having spare bikes!) and it is a nice ride for that.
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Old 02-19-09, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by gear View Post
Watch out! Those is some expensive thoughts your having. I started thinking along those lines a year and a half ago. Now I am $5000+ lighter with the perfect all weather commuter/ travel bike.
Clearly I'm not being imaginative enough!
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Old 02-19-09, 11:26 AM
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I use a Specailized Sequoia Elite, a touring bike, for my commute. I changed the f/r wheels from 20/24 spokes to 32/32 spokes. I had fenders and a rear rack for panniers put on. A purist in my office, who happens to co-own the LBS where I bought the bike, hates the look of it, but she rides an all-titanium racer for her ironman competition, so her perspective is different. I do 32 miles round trip a day on it and am quite happy with the bike. I'm tall (6-1) and heavy (190lb) so the longer and heavier frame has worked well for me. I am also old (51) so the more-upright ride is comfortable for me.
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Old 02-19-09, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by rugerben View Post
very good point. I was tired and in a hurry so I forgot to mention those things.

I have a touring bike. My C-dale T400 but it's way too nice for me to beat it up with every day commuting. Besides, i can't leave a Dale locked up outside the supermarket or whatever. it'd get stolen before I even get off the damn bike.

But I'm thinking that once a rocking Nashbar sale comes along, I'll buy this bad boy and build it up as my every day commuter. I'm thinking 9 speed cassette, with triple chainrings, and bar end shifters.

If I sell my Giant TranSend, i can probably fund it pretty easily as well.
Sell your Giant TranSend? I was looking at that bike recently (with an Alfine internal hub for winter biking). Why didn't you like it? Is it a crappy bike in some way?
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Old 02-19-09, 11:54 AM
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Originally Posted by chipcom View Post
With my new place of employment and short, rolling commute, I've gone to using a lumbar pack instead of panniers, so my touring bike has been relegated to rainy day duty and I am using my old vintage Bianchi xcross bike for dry day commutes (and of course the damned snow bike for icy/snowy days like today). Sorry, but it's just a bit more fun to ride a lighter, faster, more responsive bike with brifters instead of barcons.

Of course this time of year, the weather still dictates the touring bike or snow bike most days...but spring is getting closer every day!
I totally agree that it's a lot of fun to do a dry day commute, with little to carry, on a much lighter bicycle. I prefer to do those commutes on my 17 lb carbon fiber cannondale synapse. It's still more upright/relaxed than a true racing frame and a fairly comfortable ride... and FAST! I'll commute on it when I plan to do a group ride after work. If I have to carry more than fits in my jersey pockets then I'll throw on a the back pack (I much prefer the panniers.)

However, most of the time the weather is either cold or wet (or could be wet on the way home) so I have to be prepared with rain gear. In addition, I'll throw in an extra top layer, dry socks, underwear for the workday, some extra tools, spare batteries for lights, a lock, nutrition bars/gels, a small hand pump (it's a back-up for C02), and lunch. I can fill up a pannier 3/4 full with all that stuff. That's when I'm glad I have the touring bike with it's rack. Granted, I think I'm overly prepared for weather, flats, or mechanical issues, but it's nice to have the stuff along when I've needed it. And, I figure why not? I have plenty of room to carry the stuff and I'm not racing anyone so I might as well put it on the bike. It's much more enjoyable than carrying stuff on my back.

Also, my touring bike is a Rocky Mountain Sherpa 30 that comes standard with brifters and 9 speed STI shifting. The front chainrings are 52-42-30 and the rear cassette is 11-34. It has plenty of range. I don't have any long steep hills to climb so 30 teeth as the smallest chain ring has been fine (in fact, overkill... I don't think I've used it in the last year.) I think there are several other touring bikes that come with brifters instead of barcons. Jamis Aurora, Novara Randonee, and Cannondale's touring bikes.
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Old 02-19-09, 12:01 PM
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I hate using my touring bike for commuting, but I'm pretty sure it's due to the fact that the bike is a size to big, I find the Cannondale "way stretched out" top tube uncomfortable, and it's 100% aluminum. :-) Oh, and it's not as fast as my road bike. :-)

But seriously, there is one legitimate why reason I prefer my road bike over a modern, properly fitted touring bike. When I had a touring bike I would always groan when I hit stops, as it seemed like it took forever to get back up to speed. It's relaxed geometry and heavier wheels aren't meant for constant starts and stops - it's designed for hours of uninterrupted biking. After a while I found myself running through stops where I really shouldn't have cut it as close as I did because I found stopping and starting again so irritating.

On my road bike the stops and starts are so much easier and quicker that it's kind of exciting. I mean, I'm not exactly thrilled with stops yet, but since I get back up to speed in about 3 seconds I haven't been having any "oops, I really should have stopped there" moments.

P.S. There are good ways to put a rack on a bike without rack mounts, like in this thread:
A solution to the "Want a rack on my carbon/road bike" I hadn't seen before - Bike Forums

Though since I'm able to keep extra shoes and pants at work, I've just been using a small biking-specific backpack/camelback with one of those curved plastic + mesh backs that keeps my back from getting sweaty.

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