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Seatpost racks?

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Old 09-12-09, 10:49 AM
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thenomad
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Seatpost racks?

I'll be commuting to work (hopefully) a minimum of 2 days a week and possibly more.
I'll probably switch out bikes for a while just to test them out. Hardtail MTB and steel road frame (race geometry)
13 miles each way, if I feel feisty then another 10 training miles on the way home once a week.

I was thinking of a backpack but I do sweat a lot and can see it getting old after a while.

A) rack/carrying stuff
So, what do you think about seatpost quick release clamp on racks?
I figured I could swap it back and forth to each bike, bungee up my backpack to it for the ride or even if I need to carry something extra home. The roadie has no eyelets for a rack and I feel a full rack would be a hassle when I want to ride the MTB on the weekends.

Anyone use them and are they worth the prices they fetch? Will I be able to attach my backpack to it securely with clothes and a book or two? Will it flop around on me?
I saw a Topeak with alloy post and plastic platform for $30


(I plan on putting road 26x1.25 tires on the MTB and just dealing with the front suspension. Road bike may need 700x28 to better deal with commuting)
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Old 09-12-09, 10:55 AM
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I love mine. So easy to take off and put back on.
http://www.ebikestop.com/topeak_beam...mes-RK2541.php
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Old 09-12-09, 02:37 PM
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thenomad
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I think I'll pick one up, the worst that could happen is I take it back I suppose.
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Old 09-12-09, 02:42 PM
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10 Wheels
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Get the side brackets for panniers and ride.


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Old 09-12-09, 04:00 PM
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I heard the seat post mounted racks have a tendency to sway if not cinched down really tightly. Although I think that the weight has something to do with it. Also I heard do not attach it to a carbon fiber seatpost.

I thought they made racks that were able to attach to both the seat stays and the seat post? If they do you may want to look into it.
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Old 09-12-09, 06:29 PM
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Def won't put it on carbon post.

Interesting option to get one with panier option. I suppose some time i may try them so it may be worth it to invest in them. I certainly would enjoy a "bike vacation" in the future. Seeing your bike gives confidence it would work well. I didn't think it'd hold all that much.
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Old 09-12-09, 06:33 PM
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Originally Posted by thenomad View Post
Def won't put it on carbon post.

Interesting option to get one with panier option. I suppose some time i may try them so it may be worth it to invest in them. I certainly would enjoy a "bike vacation" in the future. Seeing your bike gives confidence it would work well. I didn't think it'd hold all that much.
I have had No problems with the carbon seat post.
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Old 09-12-09, 11:43 PM
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I heard the seat post mounted racks have a tendency to sway if not cinched down really tightly. Although I think that the weight has something to do with it. Also I heard do not attach it to a carbon fiber seatpost.
I've had my seatpost rack (topeak) since 1998. It has never swayed on me. For the last year, I've been using it on my carbon fiber seatpost every day for commuting. I generally carry about 15 lbs of stuff in my trunk bag (including the weight of the bag itself) which is mounted on the rack. No problems.

[edited for clarity]

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Old 09-13-09, 12:13 AM
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I recommend against using a quick-release, seatpost-mounted rack.

*Topeak sells the rack and pannier holders separately. This increases cost. Without the pannier holders, the rack is near useless for carrying cargo wider than the rack itself (and the rack is narrower than many permanently-mounted racks).
*To prevent sway, you must ensure that the load is equally balanced on both sides of the rack's center line.
*To prevent sway, the clamp must be very tightly closed. I find here the biggest problem: Everytime you close the clamp, you must close it a little tighter than the time before because the clamp's plastic "shim" (a piece of plastic that allows the quick release lever to lift and depress easily) wears away. The seatpost shim also wears away. Because of these two failures, you can never fully tighten the rack so that it will not sway. My rack swayed one time and the little hooks at the bottom of the pannier (to keep bungees on - but does a poor job when your bike vibrates too much) collided into a spoke and broke it.

Please remember I am writing about a quick-release rack from Topeak, the same model as 10 Wheels's above: Topeak Beam Rack MTX V-Type for Large Frames.

I recommend as an alternative that you look into semi-permanently mounted seatpost racks (they use bolts and a tool for installation and removal), or a rack that can be installed on bikes without eyelets.
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Old 09-13-09, 04:03 AM
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I use a Topeak seat-post rack with Deuter saddle bags. I had a lot of sway until I replaced the Topeak shim with a 1/8 inch thick shim made of what appears to be real rubber, or perhaps it's a very high-grade synthetic plastic. But then again I don't carry a lot of weight on the thing; just a change of clothes, basis tools, and such. The most I've ever carried weight wise would be a bottle of wine and a six-pack of beer in each bag, and that's no problem.
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Old 09-13-09, 04:27 AM
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The most I've ever carried weight wise would be a bottle of wine and a six-pack of beer in each bag, and that's no problem.
So you're saying your rack can really hold its liquor?

Topeak must have changed their shim. The one I got with mine 11 years ago was a thick piece of rubber. It has served me well all this time.
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Old 09-13-09, 04:37 AM
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think I'll pick one up, the worst that could happen is I take it back I suppose.
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Old 09-13-09, 10:11 AM
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I should mention the reason I bought the Topeak quick-release seatpost rack: I wanted to carry two u-locks without a backpack.

For this purpose, the rack performs excellently. However, I eventually bought a mini u-lock and cable so I don't use the rack anymore.

If you would like to do the same, I will sell you mine
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Old 09-14-09, 10:40 AM
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I have a Delta on my Cannondale, with a Nashbar rack trunk on it. I swapped the carbon post for an Alu one, just to be safe. The rack is not a QR unit- it uses 4 cap screws. It is very secure, and the trunk holds my lunch and the other items I need to cart back and forth to work with room to spare.
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