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A novel way to carry small things around

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A novel way to carry small things around

Old 06-03-10, 10:55 AM
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Seattle Forrest
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A novel way to carry small things around

For me, this is a leisure issue, and not a commuter one, but most bike commuters tend to carry stuff with them, which I'm lucky to be able to avoid. So I'm hoping someone else out there will get some mileage out of this. In my case, there's a great park a few miles from my house, which is too short to drive, but sometimes I just want to read a book in the sun. Without racks, panniers, or a backpack, that's been easier said than done.

I use sea bags while kayaking. They're waterproof enough to put a digital SLR camera with an expensive lens in, tie this to the hull, and set it in the lake. ( You can't tow it because of the drag, but the bag holds the water out. ) Boat people love rope, and so these things have D rings on the ends. You can clip this to your belt with a carabiner. I'm finding four liters to be a great bag size.

This holds a book and a small snack, or a bit of other gear. There's no sweaty back, no gear for the bike if you prefer a "naked" cycle ( but not rider! ), doesn't hit the wheel, and attaches near your center of balance, so it's pretty comfortable. And the total cost is around $15.



I don't have a picture of me riding with one, but hopefully that pic is helpful. Also, while this is a cromulent way to carry lunch, or a book, I don't think it would work for bigger loads ( clothes + shoes, or a laptop ), because the bag is going to swing around and get in the way. Still, victory is mine (!), and I wanted to share what's been working for me...
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Old 06-03-10, 11:00 AM
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belt???

Think I would rather break down and get a quick release handlebar or seat pack.
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Old 06-03-10, 11:22 AM
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I've got a tiny one that just fits my phone and wallet, I use it regardless of the weather conditions because it also keeps those items from getting sweaty in my pocket. As a plus, I've found that the touch screen on my phone still works through the heavy clear vinyl
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Old 06-03-10, 11:29 AM
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Cargo tubes that slip into your water bottle cage seem like a good idea. I saw one at REI but resisted the temptation to pay that much for it, since I usually have a bag.

I've been known to slip a pair of underwear and socks into an old water bottle when riding my fancy road bike to work. Better than a big bulge in my jersey pocket.
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Old 06-03-10, 11:29 AM
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I have a couple of large, heavy vinyl roll-top dry bags I use for commuting. I use them as backpack liners in my GoLite pack, and I can fit clothes, towels, laptop, etc. in there and not worry about riding in the soaking rain.
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Old 06-03-10, 11:43 AM
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http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/sho..._id=GoogleBase

I use this seal pack. Totally waterproof and the belt is included. I use this for just running around on my commuter bike when a mess bag or backpack is not really needed.
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Old 06-03-10, 12:04 PM
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Originally Posted by sggoodri View Post
Cargo tubes that slip into your water bottle cage seem like a good idea. I saw one at REI but resisted the temptation to pay that much for it, since I usually have a bag.
I didn't know these existed - very cool idea! It sounds like they wouldn't work for a book, which isn't really a commuting need for many people, but the main thing I'm after. Still, I'll have to keep my eyes open...

Originally Posted by cyclefreaksix View Post
http://www.moosejaw.com/moosejaw/sho..._id=GoogleBase

I use this seal pack. Totally waterproof and the belt is included. I use this for just running around on my commuter bike when a mess bag or backpack is not really needed.
Looks like basically my idea, only more convenient. I might get one. Thanks for the tip!
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Old 06-03-10, 12:16 PM
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I recently put on a Wald folding basket. Really nice. I've already carried everything from a couple of gallons of milk to a weed trimmer and a small container of gasoline. I'm kind of thinking about getting another one and not using my panniers anymore.
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Old 06-03-10, 12:19 PM
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You're right, it is a novel way to carry things. Like anything else, it has its own pros & cons. Since it goes on the belt, it will be easier to take along than a saddle or handlebar pack. Not as bulky as a backpack or messenger bag. The closest relative is the fanny pack/hip pack. I use one of those from time to time, and it also "includes the belt." But they're usually not waterproof.

I'm just admitting to myself that I'm a bag junkie, so I'll have this in the back of my mind.

4L seems kind of big for something dangling on the belt though. (they just attach at one point, right?)
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Old 06-03-10, 02:15 PM
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They just attach at one point, but the opening rolls up, so while four liters seems huge, in practice, the thing is only a few inches long if I'm carrying an apple, or as long as whatever book I'm reading. The width of the bag is closer to being set in stone, though.

I think the main pro to this approach, for me, is that I already have a few of these bags for kayaking, and so now I'm getting more use out of them...

( Plus I got to sneak in a bad pun about a novel way to carry books. )
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Old 06-03-10, 09:34 PM
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Originally Posted by JeremyZ
But they're usually not waterproof. [ ... ] 4L seems kind of big for something dangling on the belt though.
They're available in various sizes/colors, fold down very compactly, and were waterproof enough that my digital SLR camera with lens were dry despite several water rides at Disneyworld.
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Old 06-04-10, 07:43 AM
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dry bag + basket = best of both worlds.
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Old 06-04-10, 07:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Seattle Forrest View Post
I didn't know these existed - very cool idea! It sounds like they wouldn't work for a book, which isn't really a commuting need for many people, but the main thing I'm after. Still, I'll have to keep my eyes open...
http://www.rei.com/product/776187
http://www.rei.com/product/723319

Just a little more capacity than a seat pack. Looks like a good solution for a couple of tools, a tube, a wallet, keys, and maybe change of underwear.
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Old 06-04-10, 10:24 AM
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climbers chalkbag attached to seat bag loops works for me. it usually carries keys, garage door opener, that type of stuff. great for carrying a bunch of gu packets or other snacks on a ride, it will even carry a slightly less than full lidded cup of to-go coffee if you load it carefully, but i dont' do that on my commute, just touring.
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Old 06-04-10, 11:07 AM
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Hey, Bek - the way you've got it attached to the back of your seat ... do you feel it when you ride? I'm guessing it's out of the way so it probably doesn't bump into you, and light enough not to change the way the bike handles?

I've been doing a much better job lately of (1) eating well in general, and (2) eating well on long rides. Apples and bananas are my friends, and I've been having a hard time managing bananas on rides. So your last pic got my attention ... I think you've convinced me to try it.

Of course, that means I'll have to start climbing. I can't count the number of times I've gone hiking from exit 38, and seen people rope their way up the cliff. I've always said "yeah, someday." Damn.
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Old 06-04-10, 12:26 PM
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Originally Posted by sggoodri View Post
http://www.rei.com/product/776187
http://www.rei.com/product/723319

Just a little more capacity than a seat pack. Looks like a good solution for a couple of tools, a tube, a wallet, keys, and maybe change of underwear.
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Old 06-06-10, 12:39 PM
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I am rock climber and a cyclist and just wanted to let you know of another way of using the dry bags. These bags are being used now on big wall climbs as 'poop bags'.

Yes, the name implies what it means.
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