Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Considering this one.....

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Considering this one.....

Old 11-08-10, 04:33 AM
  #1  
hbrogan57
Harry
Thread Starter
 
hbrogan57's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 41
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Considering this one.....

I am considering this as a commuter. Should I go with it or stick with "fat tire"????

http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/1_series/12/
Attached Images
File Type: jpg
TREK_12_whiteblack.jpg (97.7 KB, 21 views)
hbrogan57 is offline  
Old 11-08-10, 05:26 AM
  #2  
Grillparzer
Grillparzer
 
Grillparzer's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Silver Spring, MD
Posts: 640

Bikes: Surly Cross Check

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
It will depend on how much weight you need to carry back and forth; more weight, fatter tires.
Grillparzer is offline  
Old 11-08-10, 05:48 AM
  #3  
That Linux Guy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I commute daily on a road bike and have no regrets with the "skinny" tires. I do get a bit concerned when I'm carrying home 2 medium panniers worth of groceries but that's it and it's rare that I do that.

Plus, commuting by road bike is kind of like driving by sports car. It's fast, handles wonderfully once you get used to it and they usually look awesome.

It's more important that you're comfortable with riding it. Not just fit but I'm referring to the bike as a whole. Big picture kind of thing. Test ride one a couple times and if you keep liking it, go for it.
That Linux Guy is offline  
Old 11-08-10, 07:02 AM
  #4  
cyclefreaksix
Senior Member
 
cyclefreaksix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Plano Texas
Posts: 1,311
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I commute year round on a road bike and I love it. That Trek looks nice and its got fender/rack mounts too!
cyclefreaksix is offline  
Old 11-08-10, 07:18 AM
  #5  
RichardGlover
2nd Amendment Cyclist
 
RichardGlover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Cary, NC
Posts: 1,036

Bikes: Schwinn 2010 World Street, Handsome Speedy w/ SRAM Apex

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Looks like it'll take fenders (a huge bonus for commuting, especially in foul weather).

Can take a rear rack, but you might have to get creative if you want to run a rack and fenders at the same time (only one set of lower attachment points on the rear). Several ways to overcome that, including using a backpack.


IMO, it mostly depends on whether you like riding in the drops or not. If you use the hoods 90% of the time, then you might want to look at a hybrid.
RichardGlover is offline  
Old 11-08-10, 07:24 AM
  #6  
That Linux Guy
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 118
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by RichardGlover View Post
Looks like it'll take fenders (a huge bonus for commuting, especially in foul weather).

Can take a rear rack, but you might have to get creative if you want to run a rack and fenders at the same time (only one set of lower attachment points on the rear). Several ways to overcome that, including using a backpack.


IMO, it mostly depends on whether you like riding in the drops or not. If you use the hoods 90% of the time, then you might want to look at a hybrid.
If my Specialized Allez Double Steel has taught me anything, it's that even when a bike has fender eyelets, it doesn't mean that fitting full coverage fenders will be easy. I had a pain of a time fitting SKS P35 fenders on my bike, although I was able to fit a rear rack and rear fender on the same eyelets.

You also bring up a good point about riding with drops. Not sure how long the OP's commute is but I've got 2 different routes I can take for my commute. In the shorter of the two, I can stay on the hoods and be perfectly happy. On the longer and "hilly-er" of the two, I live in the drops. The OP might love the drops for one route and never touch them for another.
That Linux Guy is offline  
Old 11-08-10, 07:29 AM
  #7  
NormanF
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 5,721
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 140 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd recommend an all-around disc brake equipped adventure bike: in steel, the Salsa Vaya and in alloy, the Trek Portand and Schwinn Super Sport DBX. What they all have in common is a relaxed geometry, rack mounts and the ability to accept wider tires with fenders. If you had to have only ONE bike, I would recommend an all-around adventure bike.
NormanF is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
banerjek
Road Cycling
51
08-26-09 01:33 PM
Relyet
Classic & Vintage
3
07-23-09 06:24 PM
interceptor
Road Cycling
48
03-03-08 02:27 PM
EJ123
Foo
14
04-02-07 10:07 AM
Skyline_Dougie
Training & Nutrition
6
08-25-04 03:59 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.