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Flat-bars or Drop-downs? Help!!!

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Flat-bars or Drop-downs? Help!!!

Old 12-02-10, 09:56 PM
  #26  
DC Wheels
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I biked as a kid and my bikes were 'flat bars' more or less. So when I came back to biking as an adult I was initially prejudiced towards drop downs. The position didn't look comfortable. The thin and hard seats looked really uncomfortable. The people I saw riding them wore skin tight biker shorts, etc. So my first bike was a nice hybrid. I really enjoyed it as a recreation bike for a couple of years and then I found commuting and I continued to enjoy my bike. As I got stronger I found myself raising my seat higher to get myself in a position to better maximize my pedaling. I started having longer recreational rides and my hands would get a bit numb from the same position. Then finally I had a moment when I realized that I had evolved as a rider and that what was once a perfect fit no longer fit quite as well. I started test riding lots of bikes with drop down bars. What was once uncomfortable made perfect sense. I now ride a touring bike for my urban commute and for recreational rides when the weather is nice. It's just a better fit for what I do. In my opinion what you get now really doesn't matter. Get something you like without thinking it'll be the last bike you'll ever have. What's comfortable for you may change and then again maybe it won't. Ride and enjoy!
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Old 12-03-10, 02:49 AM
  #27  
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Regardless drop bar options, my experience, comming from flat bars and mountain bikes and having wide shoulders is that i need a drop bar with wide top/flat section and spread drops... So after going though various drop bars and feeling always unconfortable on the drops i tried Salsa's Bell-Lap and they're an instant favourite since they're the only ones i tried that offer a real natural hand position both in the flats and drops. Bell laps are probably the best money i spent to get my bike fitted to me.

Coque.
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Old 12-03-10, 09:47 AM
  #28  
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Originally Posted by no1mad View Post
One doesn't need drops to go faster, though at some point it does help.
IMO the single most important determinant of riding efficiency is body position. Getting low and out of the wind will do more to make you go faster than any single hardware component, like faster/lighter wheels, narrower tires, lighter frame, lighter shifters, etc. It's been said by the Tour De France commentators that drafting another cyclist reduces your work effort by 30 to 40 percent. That's why time trial bikes all come with aerobars - they offer the most horizontal upper body position possible, minimizing wind resistance.
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Old 12-03-10, 09:55 AM
  #29  
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Originally Posted by DC Wheels View Post
Get something you like without thinking it'll be the last bike you'll ever have.
It's the law of N + 1. You always need one more bike. For example, I have three, and I ride all three regularly. And yet, I just need ONE MORE - A time trial bike. Don't have that yet.
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Old 12-03-10, 11:03 AM
  #30  
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For everyday commuting, I use a riser bar (not much rise, though) for a more upright body position, and more comfort/better visibility. I can lower my body for a more aero position if the wind is really strong. A riser bar (or flat bar) will allow the use of bar ends, which provide more hand positions. Ergon and Cane Creek make excellent bar ends in different styles.
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Old 12-03-10, 12:15 PM
  #31  
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I get wrist pain from flat bars on anything but short rides.
I like the multiple hand positions and more natural positions available on drop bars.
If you're just putzing to work for a few miles then flat bars may be a good choice, but if you want to ride 30 min or more you may want something else. There are hybrid type bikes with an upright position and drop bars. This puts the bars up higher so the top flats are like upright bikes, and you still have the drop position if it's windy etc.
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Old 12-03-10, 12:23 PM
  #32  
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another vote for drops

my bike came with them and i was going to replace with flats or bullhorns. but while i was saving money and deciding what to do, i lost some weight/increased flexibility and was able to try the drops without any back or neck pain and loved it. I am mostly on the hoods and covering the brakes with index and middle fingers while maneuvering through traffic. but i like when i get opportunities to tuck in and speed up.
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Old 12-03-10, 01:38 PM
  #33  
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While this is entirely up to each person. I prefer drops due to options available to me.
The $ portion of the drop bar are the STI brifters.
Therefore for the price of a 2200/Sora equipped dropped bar bike you can get a 105/Deore LX level if not higher flat-bar version.

Flat bars are fine too. You can attach bar ends to increase hand positions. There are also those butterfly trekking type bars which are great. I don't like them from an aesthetic POV. Try a few bike formats OP.
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Old 12-04-10, 05:25 AM
  #34  
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WOW, thanks for all the info guys, I went to my LBSs about 3 of them and they had some decent used bikes, but they were definately used and looked it. Before I thought drop-downs were too, yeah "Roadie" but now I see how awesome they are after trying them. BRILLIANT!!! DROP-DOWNS ARE AMAZING!! So I spoke to my serious road-biking friends and they suggested this bike for me : https://www.wiggle.co.uk/giant-defy-4...ource=googleps. I'm gonna go for it but not to sure about the shifting. Oh well, I'll learn. Thanks for all the info guys,but flat-bars just aren't that good.
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Old 12-04-10, 07:51 AM
  #35  
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Drop Bars! I'm half tempted to put drops on my Madsen. For one, wind sucks. For another, as soon as you get in shape and start cruising the flats at 18-22 mph, you're going to be making your own wind no matter where you go, and drops become essential for comfort.
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Old 12-04-10, 10:27 PM
  #36  
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Best of both worlds, get dirt drops like the Salsa Woodchippers.
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Old 12-05-10, 04:58 AM
  #37  
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Originally Posted by scroca View Post
I am in the process of building a winter bike and I'm going with flat bars. My reason is that I can then use pogies when it gets really cold.


https://barmitts.com/
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