Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Retro City, Dutch Bikes, or what name? Opinions

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Retro City, Dutch Bikes, or what name? Opinions

Old 02-12-11, 02:42 PM
  #1  
bikesdirect_com
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,605
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Retro City, Dutch Bikes, or what name? Opinions

A bunch of questions about these bikes

http://publicbikes.com/Bikes

http://www.linusbike.com/models/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERBfFx1VW1Q



1 - What would you call them? Retro-city bikes? Dutch bikes? English-racer [what we called them in the 60s]? Or something else?
2 – Have you seen more new ones in use in your area?
3 – How much do you think bikes like this should sell for? In 1-speed? In 3-speed?
4 – If you were going to get one would you want SS of IGH? Would you want matching rear rack?
5 – Is traditional steel attractive to you; would you prefer aluminum; or does it matter?
__________________
http://www.bikesdirect.com

"First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win." – Mahatma Gandhi
bikesdirect_com is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 03:16 PM
  #2  
silentlysailing
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: DFW TX
Posts: 42

Bikes: Fuji Supreme 3.0le, Tern Link p24h, 1995 Trek 950

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I like the term retro city. In my opinion dutch bikes are full featured and a bit heavier.
silentlysailing is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 07:29 PM
  #3  
fuzz2050
Real Men Ride Ordinaries
 
fuzz2050's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,723
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Dutch bikes are from the Netherlands, usually weight as much as the rider, and more often than not are bought from a drug addict on a corner.

English Racer is a major misnomer, since they are neither English, nor for racing. Retro-city bike doesn't make much sense, since they aren't retro, and the idea of a 'city bike' varies so much from person to person as to be useless.

however, those bikes are obviously trying for the 'Dutch style' so how about 'Neo-Dutch'?

or 'Dutch-esque'

If I were to buy one, I would want it to come well appointed, fenders and a rack included. Mounts for a chain guard would be nice.

I think the major feature of these would have to be cost, it's destined to be used as a beater city bike, so keep it simple. Single speed (but please no coaster brakes), no fancy features like dynamo hubs, and priced as low as you can get it. I think steel would have more appeal, but either would work, for the right price.

Also, can I put myself on the list for a sample? I think there is a market for low priced commuters out there that isn't being met.

Last edited by fuzz2050; 02-12-11 at 07:37 PM.
fuzz2050 is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 07:46 PM
  #4  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,363
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I like the simple term 'City Bike' myself. Many older Schwinn/CCM/Raleigh bikes have some of the features (or all) of Dutch bikes and I think calling them english racers is a bit silly too. There were some neat three-speed road bikes from the 50s and they had a good thread in C&V about what to call them.

Make one like your kilo-WT, but put 90mm drum brakes on it (have a braze-on for the reaction arms), a dyno and a full aluminum chaincase... can't beat that for an all-weather and stylish city bike... throw in everything like rack, lights and fenders or sell it as an add-on. Easy to make one with drops and one with cruiser bars if you use SA hubs and their different shifters. An aluminum frame and stainless hardware would be worth a few more bucks to me... Torker Graduate is a decent example, but they cheap out on the seatpost and those SA gripshifts are kind of goofy if you ask me. SA thumb shifters or the trigger shifters seem much nicer choices to put on a retro-themed bike and I find them much easier to use. Yeah... that's a dream build for sure eh
clasher is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 08:43 PM
  #5  
Fizzaly
Stealing Spokes since 82'
 
Fizzaly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Boy-z, Ideeeho
Posts: 1,875

Bikes: The always reliable kuwie

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Retro-City bike for sure, and of course steel that is just a silly question
Fizzaly is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 08:55 PM
  #6  
kludgefudge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 437

Bikes: late 80's bianchi campion d'italia, early 90's trek 2100, early 90's shogun selectra, mid 90's aluminum marin xcMTB, dept. store grade but upgraded columbia double eagle tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1 - What would you call them? Retro-city bikes? Dutch bikes? English-racer [what we called them in the 60s]? Or something else?
2 – Have you seen more new ones in use in your area?
3 – How much do you think bikes like this should sell for? In 1-speed? In 3-speed?
4 – If you were going to get one would you want SS of IGH? Would you want matching rear rack?
5 – Is traditional steel attractive to you; would you prefer aluminum; or does it matter?
1 - What would you call them? Retro-city bikes? Dutch bikes? English-racer [what we called them in the 60s]? Or something else?
2 – Have you seen more new ones in use in your area?
3 – How much do you think bikes like this should sell for? In 1-speed? In 3-speed?
4 – If you were going to get one would you want SS of IGH? Would you want matching rear rack?
5 – Is traditional steel attractive to you; would you prefer aluminum; or does it matter?
1) City bikes. Yes it is a fairly broad term but they are basically purpose built for urban transportation. (read: not hybrids)

2) not really.older MTB's and modern hybrids are the norm for "city bikes" my city bike is an old raleigh monger with a triple mtn chainring so I have a nice bailout granny for the big hills. There also are not any dealers selling a good selection of this kind of product.

3) $300ish(single) - $600ish(5 speed). I think Torker is probably offering the best value in this area. That said, people see the prices of say, the Linus bikes and say "overpriced". These are not exactly mass produced and therefore their premium prices makes sense. I realize they are not a great value, but I doubt the companies manufacturing them could afford to sell them much cheaper.

4) I would want the IGH. If I were to buy a new bike for real world city use tomorrow it would be the Torker Graduate. 5 speed internal, fenders, drum brakes....and all for less than $600. I believe for 2011 it has the thumb shifter and not the gripshift, which is a bonus.

5) A lot of these bikes are built with cheap Hi-tensile steel instead of the better Cro-moly that most "good" steel bikes are made from. A lot of people whine about this, but personally I think these folks have developed an unhealthy bias from their immersion in the sport and recreation orientated "bike culture". The way I see it, utilitarian city bikes do not need to be made from double butted Reynolds 531. I would rather the money be put into better quality brakes/shifters/wheels etc. when trying to make a decent city bike for a low price.
kludgefudge is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 09:10 PM
  #7  
tcs
Palmer
 
tcs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Parts Unknown
Posts: 5,890

Bikes: 1980 Mike Melton, 1982 Stumpjumper, 1982 Santana, 1984 Alex Moulton AM, 2008 BikeFriday tikit T-11, 2010 Dawes Briercliffe, 2017 Dahon Curl i5, 2019 Surly ½DT14

Mentioned: 20 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 521 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 28 Times in 27 Posts
Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
What would you call them?
If I was describing them or marketing them?

English Racer is a great marketing hook, just as it was 45 years ago.
tcs is online now  
Old 02-12-11, 09:30 PM
  #8  
kludgefudge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 437

Bikes: late 80's bianchi campion d'italia, early 90's trek 2100, early 90's shogun selectra, mid 90's aluminum marin xcMTB, dept. store grade but upgraded columbia double eagle tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tcs View Post
If I was describing them or marketing them?

English Racer is a great marketing hook, just as it was 45 years ago.
IMHO "Roadster" is a good descriptive term for them.

as a side note I would avoid the use of the word "retro" at all costs.
kludgefudge is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 10:48 PM
  #9  
fietsbob 
coprolite
 
fietsbob's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 41,481

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 183 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6726 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 141 Times in 119 Posts
Transportation.
fietsbob is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 10:48 PM
  #10  
fuzz2050
Real Men Ride Ordinaries
 
fuzz2050's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 3,723
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
Originally Posted by kludgefudge View Post
5) A lot of these bikes are built with cheap Hi-tensile steel instead of the better Cro-moly that most "good" steel bikes are made from. A lot of people whine about this, but personally I think these folks have developed an unhealthy bias from their immersion in the sport and recreation orientated "bike culture". The way I see it, utilitarian city bikes do not need to be made from double butted Reynolds 531. I would rather the money be put into better quality brakes/shifters/wheels etc. when trying to make a decent city bike for a low price.
I would completely disagree with this sentiment, I would much rather have a nice frame with simple components (Single speed, long reach calliper brakes) than a fully equipped bike built around a heavy hi-ten frame. It's been my experience that frames made from nicer tubing simply ride better. Everything else can be upgraded, but a frame is pretty much set.

It would be nice to break out from the idea that city bikes have to be about simple utilitarianism. A bike can ride well and be practical at the same time.
fuzz2050 is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 11:29 PM
  #11  
clasher
Senior Member
 
clasher's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kitchener, ON
Posts: 2,363
Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 149 Post(s)
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
I'd agree that a nice, light frame makes for an easier time riding it too, hence my suggestion for an aluminum frame, but something the kilo WT would work as a nice base too. Paint seems pretty robust these days so rust isn't a huge concern with steel.
clasher is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 11:46 PM
  #12  
adgmobile
Senior Member
 
adgmobile's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: mobile al
Posts: 83

Bikes: old ten speed

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
i would call them bikes. they are what used to be a general purpose bike. before everything was mtb.
adgmobile is offline  
Old 02-12-11, 11:48 PM
  #13  
Eileen
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 323
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I tend to call my Retrovelo a "city bike."
Eileen is offline  
Old 02-13-11, 07:48 AM
  #14  
interested
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Kψbenhavn
Posts: 465

Bikes: Kinesisbikes UK Racelight Tk

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
A bunch of questions about these bikes

http://publicbikes.com/Bikes

http://www.linusbike.com/models/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERBfFx1VW1Q



1 - What would you call them? Retro-city bikes? Dutch bikes? English-racer [what we called them in the 60s]? Or something else?
As a class of bikes, choose "city bikes". A individual model could be called "English Roadster" after its type. "Retro" is bad, choose "Classic" instead. "Racer" also give the wrong associations.
IMHO, the female market isn't so focused on names and brands, they do pay great attention to looks and practicality however. "Classic ladies bike" or just "Classic bike", "Classic city bike" or "City bike" is what grabs their attention, much more than "Dutch de Luxe", "Velochiq" or whatever fancy name the particular model gets.


Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
2 – Have you seen more new ones in use in your area?
Well, yes, but I live in Copenhagen. I assume your are more interested in US trends.


Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
3 – How much do you think bikes like this should sell for? In 1-speed? In 3-speed?
No idea about the price range.

Note however, that single speed ladies bike simply doesn't sell anymore here in flat Denmark. Single speed is selling greater than ever, but almost only to men.
IMHO, women wants to arrive at their destination without the sweat dripping down their forehead, so when the wind is up, they want to gear down and take it slower rather than just work harder. I think it is more a matter of style than fitness or strength.

Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
4 – If you were going to get one would you want SS of IGH? Would you want matching rear rack?
As a minimum I would like a 3 speed SRAM IGH and a Torpedo thumb shifter. (I could perhaps consider a SS if it came with a real F&S Torpedo hub ;-) ).
For female bikes a matching rear rack is essential. Same color is best, but at least it should be harmonious looking together with the bike. Eg. if the frame is pastel blue and the rack is aluminum colored, match it with a aluminum basket in front.
Black, Dark green/BRG, Light blue and red are the most popular color choices for ladies bikes her in Copenhagen, and the trend is definitely to make the frame and rack in the same color.


Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
5 – Is traditional steel attractive to you; would you prefer aluminum; or does it matter?
For classic ladies bikes, steel is the only choice when it comes to the correct elegant look. Aluminum tubing can work too, but it is difficult to make it elegant because the tubing gets so wide.
For men, either material could work, depending on the model. Eg. if you want a classic English Roadster with full chaincase, in dark bottle green or British Racing Green, then steel is the obvious choice. For a more generic city bike, whatever that costs less.

--
Regards
interested is offline  
Old 02-13-11, 09:16 AM
  #15  
FunkyStickman
On a Mission from God
 
FunkyStickman's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Thibodaux, LA
Posts: 2,010

Bikes: '10 Surly LHT, Rat-rod Klunker, '82 Peugeot PH12 Centennial

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
1. I call them "Cool."
2. Never seen one locally.
3. I think they're overpriced... but then again, I think 99% of bikes are overpriced.
4. I'd have to have the IGH version, I'm too out of shape to SS it everywhere.
5. Frame material doesn't matter. Aluminum is fine, but by the time you build an AL frame to be as reliable as a steel one, you've lost most of the weight advantage. Six of one, half a dozen of the other. I use whatever I can get my hands on that fits.
FunkyStickman is offline  
Old 02-13-11, 01:23 PM
  #16  
wahoonc
Membership Not Required
 
wahoonc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On the road-USA
Posts: 16,854

Bikes: Giant Excursion, Raleigh Sports, Raleigh R.S.W. Compact, Motobecane? and about 20 more! OMG

Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 66 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by adgmobile View Post
i would call them bikes. they are what used to be a general purpose bike. before everything was mtb.
+1

I do agree with an earlier poster that Torker is going to give you the most bang for the buck. Biggest problem for me is too many companies stop their sizing short of the XL. My road bike size is a 65cm...

Aaron
__________________
Webshots is bailing out, if you find any of my posts with corrupt picture files and want to see them corrected please let me know. :(

ISO: A late 1980's Giant Iguana MTB frameset (or complete bike) 23" Red with yellow graphics.

"Cycling should be a way of life, not a hobby.
RIDE, YOU FOOL, RIDE!"
_Nicodemus

"Steel: nearly a thousand years of metallurgical development
Aluminum: barely a hundred
Which one would you rather have under your butt at 30mph?"
_krazygluon
wahoonc is offline  
Old 02-13-11, 10:06 PM
  #17  
Stradavarius
Cars make you fat eh
 
Stradavarius's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Petaluma, CA
Posts: 44

Bikes: Several

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Call'm Amstel Light Bikes...since they will be lite duty Dutch bikes right?
Stradavarius is offline  
Old 02-13-11, 10:42 PM
  #18  
nashcommguy
nashcommguy
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: nashville, tn
Posts: 2,499

Bikes: Commuters: Fuji Delray road, Fuji Discovery mtb...Touring: Softride Traveler...Road: C-dale SR300

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
1 - What would you call them? Retro-city bikes? Dutch bikes? English-racer [what we called them in the 60s]? Or something else?
2 – Have you seen more new ones in use in your area?
3 – How much do you think bikes like this should sell for? In 1-speed? In 3-speed?
4 – If you were going to get one would you want SS of IGH? Would you want matching rear rack?
5 – Is traditional steel attractive to you; would you prefer aluminum; or does it matter?
Look, as long as you're going to be allowed to troll the least you can do is get out of the Pac-Rim and try to import some 'real' Euro-bikes like this one: http://www.quitmann-ms.de/eng/big_apple.html# Now that's a 'City Bike'. E1,374.00 w/a Shimano 7 sp. Or one can go the distance and get a 14 sp Rohloff for E2486.00. They're made in Gemany and are the best example of a 'City Bike' I can find anywhere.
nashcommguy is offline  
Old 02-14-11, 10:47 AM
  #19  
kludgefudge
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 437

Bikes: late 80's bianchi campion d'italia, early 90's trek 2100, early 90's shogun selectra, mid 90's aluminum marin xcMTB, dept. store grade but upgraded columbia double eagle tandem

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by fuzz2050 View Post
I would completely disagree with this sentiment, I would much rather have a nice frame with simple components (Single speed, long reach calliper brakes) than a fully equipped bike built around a heavy hi-ten frame. It's been my experience that frames made from nicer tubing simply ride better. Everything else can be upgraded, but a frame is pretty much set.

It would be nice to break out from the idea that city bikes have to be about simple utilitarianism. A bike can ride well and be practical at the same time.
Yes, you would prefer the nice frame with lesser amenities, but that is because you are a cycling enthusiast who I am guessing at the very least knows how to set up their own brakes, can maybe even true a wheel, and is willing to sweat it out up a hill; in the name of owning a bike that "rides better".

Now, I don't think there is anything wrong with this, but your average joe or josie looking for a urban utility bike, who may not be mechanically inclined or a strong rider, is better off with the multispeed and the drum brakes.
kludgefudge is offline  
Old 02-16-11, 12:16 AM
  #20  
soymateofeo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 50
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
here in the city of angels

We'd call that, "one of those old school style city cruiser chingaderas!"
soymateofeo is offline  
Old 02-16-11, 07:51 AM
  #21  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,112
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'd vote for aluminum too as long as you can make it lighter than an equivalent chromoly bike. I've seen some cheap aluminum bikes that might as well have been made from steel.

And no, this is not because I'm all about performance. I do use a bike nearly every day though and a lighter bike is just plain easier to live with all else being equal. Whether it's bringing them up a few stairs or even just maneuvering them around a bike rack.

Rehashing a classic design is fine but to me there's no reason not to take an opportunity to improve on them while you're at it. They used steel in the 50's, 60's and 70's because there were no practical alternatives. Now there are.

Some will argue that by the time you put generator hubs, IGHs and everything else on them, they're going to be heavy anyway. To me that's all the more reason to use lighter materials when possible.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 02-16-11, 09:30 AM
  #22  
WhyFi
Senior Member
 
WhyFi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Got a castle in - er, Minneapolis, that's where I dwell!
Posts: 24,634

Bikes: 2016 Diamondback Haanjo, 2018 Trek Domane SL5 Gravel

Mentioned: 294 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8753 Post(s)
Liked 73 Times in 48 Posts
Originally Posted by bikesdirect_com View Post
A bunch of questions about these bikes

http://publicbikes.com/Bikes

http://www.linusbike.com/models/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERBfFx1VW1Q



1 - What would you call them? Retro-city bikes? Dutch bikes? English-racer [what we called them in the 60s]? Or something else?
2 – Have you seen more new ones in use in your area?
3 – How much do you think bikes like this should sell for? In 1-speed? In 3-speed?
4 – If you were going to get one would you want SS of IGH? Would you want matching rear rack?
5 – Is traditional steel attractive to you; would you prefer aluminum; or does it matter?
After looking at several brands/models, my wife decided that the Linus Dutchi 3 was the one for her, so we bought it; one of the newer shops in my area carries the Linus line.

1) "Cruiser" or "city cruiser" seems apt, to me, with beach cruisers having bigger, fatter tires, maybe a longer wheelbase.
2) As is ofter the case, once you have something, you tend to notice it when other people have that same something. Since the purchase of the Linus, I've noticed quite a few people on them in the area (probably 4-1, girls-guys). Maybe they just flew under my radar before or maybe the bike shop that we got it from has been pushin' a hell of a lot of them out the door since (we did have to go with the black frame because the more desirable colors were out of stock and those on the next shipment were already spoken for).
3) Whatever you can get for them. Linus is doing well in the area at $600-700. A 3-speed, with aesthetics that are just as appealing (my wife was mostly sold on looks, the test ride was to confirm that it wasn't horrible), at $400 would rock.
4) There's no way that she would have gone with a SS. Racks were a must, wicker baskets would have just about sealed the deal without a test ride.
5) She doesn't know what the bike is made out of, nor does she care. She would probably appreciate it if the bike were a few pounds lighter, however.
WhyFi is online now  
Old 02-16-11, 12:56 PM
  #23  
bikesdirect_com
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,605
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by WhyFi View Post
After looking at several brands/models, my wife decided that the Linus Dutchi 3 was the one for her, so we bought it; one of the newer shops in my area carries the Linus line.

1) "Cruiser" or "city cruiser" seems apt, to me, with beach cruisers having bigger, fatter tires, maybe a longer wheelbase.
2) As is ofter the case, once you have something, you tend to notice it when other people have that same something. Since the purchase of the Linus, I've noticed quite a few people on them in the area (probably 4-1, girls-guys). Maybe they just flew under my radar before or maybe the bike shop that we got it from has been pushin' a hell of a lot of them out the door since (we did have to go with the black frame because the more desirable colors were out of stock and those on the next shipment were already spoken for).
3) Whatever you can get for them. Linus is doing well in the area at $600-700. A 3-speed, with aesthetics that are just as appealing (my wife was mostly sold on looks, the test ride was to confirm that it wasn't horrible), at $400 would rock.
4) There's no way that she would have gone with a SS. Racks were a must, wicker baskets would have just about sealed the deal without a test ride.
5) She doesn't know what the bike is made out of, nor does she care. She would probably appreciate it if the bike were a few pounds lighter, however.
Very interesting
I am sure she will love the Linus; they are nice
and the wicker basket idea is excellent

Also I was thinking 3 to 1 girls over guys
you could be correct at 4 to 1
__________________
http://www.bikesdirect.com

"First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win." – Mahatma Gandhi
bikesdirect_com is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.