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Rolling clothes up for commute; new job

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Rolling clothes up for commute; new job

Old 02-21-11, 07:35 AM
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TurbineBlade
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Rolling clothes up for commute; new job

Hi, I'm soon to be starting a new job that requires more of a business casual dress code (well, I'm not required - but I don't want to look like a bum) after 3 years of commuting in jeans, t-shirts, and stuff that I used to wear to work.

Anyone have pictures of the technique of rolling up clothes? I have a rear rack and 2 huge wald basets hose-clamped to it, so capacity is not an issue. Usually I bungee a backpack in one basket, and use the other for random stuff.

I'm worried about getting khakis and button-down shirts wrinkled before I even get to work
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Old 02-21-11, 10:00 AM
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I think you have the right idea. Roll them up.

Sorry, no pictures.

I usually lay out pants with shirt, socks and underwear on top and then roll the pants up taking the other items with. As long as you take care to lay things out smooth, and don't roll too tightly, you shouldn't wringle anything.

I used to fold things and that works okay, but rolling seems best.
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Old 02-21-11, 10:31 AM
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Fold the shirt 'dept store' style taking the tome to button up the front. Lay pants out w/one fols a/t leg(cuff to waist). Fold undies and place them waist to waist on the pants. Roll them together. Take socks, tie, etc. and roll w/shirt. Place both separately in a plastic grocery bag then place inside another plastic grocery bag w/t opening of the 2nd bag over the bottom of the first. This is valuable in case of rain. Asap when arriving at work unroll your work clothes and change.

Performance Bike has a garment bag for 100.00, presently that I've seen as low as 50.00 on Nashbar or Performance. It's NOT waterproof, though resistant. One would still need a plastic internal cover to be sure of keeping one's clothes dry.
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Old 02-21-11, 10:37 AM
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I found rolling didn't work all the time with my shirts. I now use one of these folders http://www.eaglecreek.com/packing_so...cking_folders/

Works great for slacks and a dress shirt.
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Old 02-21-11, 11:02 AM
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Fold your pants and find a box that they'll fit in. Have your shirts laundered and boxed. Either that, or replace the baskets with a garment pannier. Maybe it's just me, but I've never been able to get a pressed shirt and pair of trousers to look like they weren't slept in after rolling them up for a 15 mile commute.
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Old 02-21-11, 11:12 AM
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Originally Posted by TurbineBlade View Post
Hi, I'm soon to be starting a new job that requires more of a business casual dress code (well, I'm not required - but I don't want to look like a bum) after 3 years of commuting in jeans, t-shirts, and stuff that I used to wear to work.

Anyone have pictures of the technique of rolling up clothes? I have a rear rack and 2 huge wald basets hose-clamped to it, so capacity is not an issue. Usually I bungee a backpack in one basket, and use the other for random stuff.

I'm worried about getting khakis and button-down shirts wrinkled before I even get to work
Another vote here for the Eagle Creek folders. I have two of them. I fold up shirts and pants as per the little diagram printed in the folders. The folders keep everything together and folded. As soon as I get to work, I unpack everything and put it in a drawer. I find that two folders is plenty for 5 days of clothing. These folders are not waterproof at all. You are meant to pack the folders inside a pannier. If you use a big Wald basket, you could put the folders inside a large dry bag.

http://www.eaglecreek.com/packing_so...cking_folders/

You can order the folders from REI. They may seem a bit expensive, but you use them over and over.
http://www.rei.com/product/796369

Last edited by Doconabike; 02-21-11 at 11:15 AM. Reason: content
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Old 02-21-11, 11:20 AM
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I also roll and keep them packed loosely. I keep a travel steamer in my office for days when the wrinkles get the best of the clothes. I know some folks will take a few days of clothes to the office and hang them so any wrinkles fall out. Just take them back home as you've worn them, wash - repeat.
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Old 02-21-11, 11:38 AM
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Good advice on rolling your clothes. I use a slight variation. Lay out your pants and shirt as described above. Get all the wrinkles out that you can. This is key. Then roll your t-shirt and underwear around your socks, making kind of a "core". Now take that core, and use it to roll your pants and shirt around. I find that rolling the pants and shirt around something makes it easier to roll them up without wrinkles. I drop the rolled assembly into a plastic bag and that goes into my trunk bag.
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Old 02-21-11, 11:44 AM
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http://www.activetrans.org/tricks-tips Here's some pictures for you. Apparently, I've been rolling my clothes up wrong all these years too.
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Old 02-21-11, 12:03 PM
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Originally Posted by TurbineBlade View Post
.... I have a rear rack and 2 huge wald basets hose-clamped to it, so capacity is not an issue. Usually I bungee a backpack in one basket, and use the other for random stuff.

I'm worried about getting khakis and button-down shirts wrinkled before I even get to work
The good news - You have ample capacity to prevent cramming your clothes in a tight fit.
The bad news - You may need to invest in a waterproof bag.
As others have said, pack/roll it loose. When I first started, I tried to roll clothes tight with the mistaken assumption of keeping the wrinkles at bay - This will make you look like you slept in your clothes.
And pack your undies/socks inside your pants so when you walk down the hall to change your clothes, your Dilbert undies won't inadvertantly drop to the floor when the cute one walks by. (This tends to drop the flirt-o-meter like a rock....)
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Old 02-21-11, 12:19 PM
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I have never had good luck rolling - I'm apparently doing it wrong. I fold up button down shirts and pants and havent had too much of a problem. It may help that my panniers are somewhat rigid and just the right depth to keep stack of folded shirt and pants upright and flat.
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Old 02-21-11, 12:39 PM
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I find that non-cotton low-wrinkle garments help a lot in addition to careful folding or rolling. The fold lines relax faster or sometimes don't appear at all.

I fold pants and dress shirts; golf shirts I can sometimes get away with rolling.
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Old 02-21-11, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by woodway View Post
Good advice on rolling your clothes. I use a slight variation. Lay out your pants and shirt as described above. Get all the wrinkles out that you can. This is key. Then roll your t-shirt and underwear around your socks, making kind of a "core". Now take that core, and use it to roll your pants and shirt around. I find that rolling the pants and shirt around something makes it easier to roll them up without wrinkles. I drop the rolled assembly into a plastic bag and that goes into my trunk bag.
Good idea. I'll try that "core" idea tomorrow.
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Old 02-21-11, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by no motor? View Post
http://www.activetrans.org/tricks-tips Here's some pictures for you. Apparently, I've been rolling my clothes up wrong all these years too.
I see they don't recommend socks or underwear. Hmm.
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Old 02-21-11, 09:18 PM
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Clothes laid out overlapped to view how they are folded


Clothes ready to roll - starting at bottom of pants


Clothes rolled and inserted into a Hefty OneZip Jumbo 2.5 Gallon bag. Helps to use shirts with cotton/poly blend advertised as wrinkle free/resistant. Shirts come right out of the dryer and are hung to start with a shirt relatively free of wrinkles.

Good luck

Last edited by Jim-in-Kirkland; 02-21-11 at 09:18 PM. Reason: fix picture 1 link
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Old 02-21-11, 09:31 PM
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Just a possible alternative -- I keep my dress shirts at the office, run them to a local cleaner by the office instead of taking them home, so they hang in my cube and never need to get rolled in my panniers.
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Old 02-21-11, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by jputnam View Post
Just a possible alternative -- I keep my dress shirts at the office, run them to a local cleaner by the office instead of taking them home, so they hang in my cube and never need to get rolled in my panniers.
Makes sense. Why not just leave clothing at work so you don't have to go through transporting them.
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Old 02-21-11, 10:24 PM
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Shop for "wrinkle free" clothes. Sweaters are great. I've yet to drive the car to work and arrive wrinkle-free anyhow. Do put them in a plastic bag if there is any doubt to the waterproofedness of the panniers or if you carry liquids/lunch in the pannier.

I never unbutton any more buttons than I have to. Saves time.
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