Go Back  Bike Forums > Bike Forums > Commuting
Reload this Page >

Went to the bike shop.

Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Went to the bike shop.

Old 04-13-11, 02:41 PM
  #1  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Went to the bike shop.

For the spoke I broke. They told me the freewheel was seized up and there was nothing they could do. So I rode on it as long as I could, till 3 more spokes broke at once. So then my next mission was to get a new wheel. My girlfriend surprised me with a new bike, and it was awesome. But the wheel was a little untrue. So I decided to fix it before I had any more problems. Unfortunately, I broke a spoke...... Me thinking "NO problem" decided to take the freewheel and put it on the front rim of my old bike. All the ball bearings fell out and now I have no idea how to get them back in. So no I'm sitting there looking like an ---hole having just destroyed the rim to the bike she just got me.
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 02:53 PM
  #2  
Dan The Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
First tip, add a drop of lube before wrenching spoke nipples. Why did you want to take the free wheel off the new bike and put it on the front rim of the old bike? Some of what you are saying makes no sense to me and I think you may be using the wrong terminology. How did you get the freewheel off? Are you sure you didn't take the axle out? What happened to the spokes and hub for the front wheel of your old bike?
Dan The Man is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 02:56 PM
  #3  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,112
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
For the spoke I broke. They told me the freewheel was seized up and there was nothing they could do. So I rode on it as long as I could, till 3 more spokes broke at once. So then my next mission was to get a new wheel. My girlfriend surprised me with a new bike, and it was awesome. But the wheel was a little untrue. So I decided to fix it before I had any more problems. Unfortunately, I broke a spoke...... Me thinking "NO problem" decided to take the freewheel and put it on the front rim of my old bike. All the ball bearings fell out and now I have no idea how to get them back in. So no I'm sitting there looking like an ---hole having just destroyed the rim to the bike she just got me.
DON'T WORRY

Not sure how you kept riding with a seized freewheel but I digress...

I think you might be mixing up a couple of terms. The "freewheel" is the cluster of gears on the back. They look similar to but are different than "cassettes" which are more modern. A "hub" is what the spokes attach to at the center of a wheel. Front and rear hubs are different and you can't put a freewheel on a (normal) front hub or wheel.

Anyway, take your wheel back to bike shop and they'll be able to fix you up. My brother made the same mistake trying to replace a spoke on his rear wheel. Instead of taking off the freewheel or cassette to get access to the spoke hole on the hub, he removed the axle. That'll lead to the ball bearings falling out. Putting in new bearings and re-greasing is an inexpensive and common maintenance procedure anyway. Probably didn't need it so soon, but it's not going to hurt anything.

You have a great girlfriend. You can probably get an estimate on repair costs over the phone and when she hears that it's not much, she probably won't freak.

Don't let this discourage you from working on your bikes in the future, it's an easy mistake to make. Replacing a spoke doesn't seem like it should be a big deal and it isn't, - unless it's on the right side of the rear wheel. The newbie often loosens the only thing that looks like they can loosen. It's not at all obvious how to get a freewheel or cassette off and it requires special tools.

Last edited by tjspiel; 04-13-11 at 03:13 PM.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 02:56 PM
  #4  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Yes, I did take the axle out. I wanted to take off the freewheel, but I didn't have tools. I was going to put the freewheel on the front rim of my old bike, since I broke the spoke on the new one.
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 02:59 PM
  #5  
Dan The Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
Yes, I did take the axle out. I wanted to take off the freewheel, but I didn't have tools. I was going to put the freewheel on the front rim of my old bike, since I broke the spoke on the new one.
That makes no sense whatsoever. Either the freewheel is not what you are calling it, or the front rim is not what you are calling it, and I can't figure out any logical alternative to either of those words.
Dan The Man is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:10 PM
  #6  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
CACycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,564

Bikes: '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Front and rear hubs are not the same. You can't put a freewheel on a front hub so your attempt was destined to fail from the beginning. Here is a site that will show how these things go together:
http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-...and-adjustment
You'll need some specialized tools and you might want to consider taking the new bike's wheel in and have that fixed at the shop. You can go to town on the old bike's various components and see how you do. That way, you've got a bike that works and, hopefully someday, a back up bike that works as well.
CACycling is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:12 PM
  #7  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I was trying to true the wheel, and I broke a spoke, not having a broke n spoke, I went to turn my old front wheel into my new rear wheel. I took the axle out and spilled my bearings everywhere. Then I realized I couldn't take the freewheel off anyway, because it needs a special tool.
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:20 PM
  #8  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
DON'T WORRY

Not sure how you kept riding with a seized freewheel but I digress...

I think you might be mixing up a couple of terms. The "freewheel" is the cluster of gears on the back. They look similar to but are different than "cassettes" which are more modern. A "hub" is what the spokes attach to at the center of a wheel. Front and rear hubs are different and you can't put a freewheel on a (normal) front hub or wheel.

Anyway, take your wheel back to bike shop and they'll be able to fix you up. My brother made the same mistake trying to replace a spoke on his rear wheel. Instead of taking off the freewheel or cassette to get access to the spoke hole on the hub, he removed the axle. That'll lead to the ball bearings falling out. Putting in new bearings and re-greasing is an inexpensive and common maintenance procedure anyway. Probably didn't need it so soon, but it's not going to hurt anything.

You have a great girlfriend. You can probably get an estimate on repair costs over the phone and when she hears that it's not much, she probably won't freak.

Don't let this discourage you from working on your bikes in the future, it's an easy mistake to make. Replacing a spoke doesn't seem like it should be a big deal and it isn't, - unless it's on the right side of the rear wheel. The newbie often loosens the only thing that looks like they can loosen. It's not at all obvious how to get a freewheel or cassette off and it requires special tools.
Are you telling me the axle never had to come out? Don't tell my girlfriend that.... Lol. Today is my only day off this week too....
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:23 PM
  #9  
Dan The Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
I was trying to true the wheel, and I broke a spoke, not having a broke n spoke, I went to turn my old front wheel into my new rear wheel. I took the axle out and spilled my bearings everywhere. Then I realized I couldn't take the freewheel off anyway, because it needs a special tool.
Okay, I see your logic. The thing is that it would be a huge deal more work to turn your front wheel into a rear wheel than it would be to just replace the one spoke. The front and rear hubs are very different. Converting the front wheel would require a rear hub and that would mean respoking the entire wheel. You can't just slap the freewheel onto the front hub.

Putting the ball bearings back in isn't a huge deal if you can find all of the ball bearings, but you might need a special wrench called a cone wrench to do it yourself. See Park Tools website for instructions. If you take it to a bike shop they can do it for you. Maybe bring a few of the ball bearings so they know what size they are.

Replacing the broken spoke isn't a big deal either. If it is on the non-drive train side, they can just add a new one in. If it's on the side of your gears and chain, then they need to remove the freewheel to get to the flange where the spoke attaches. That is why they couldn't replace the broken spoke on your old bike. There are destructive methods however, which should have been able to remove that freewheel.

If you are truing your own wheel, make sure you have the right size spoke wrench and lubricated threads, and remember that like a lot of things to do with bicycles, the old adage "righty tighty" does not apply. Also it is a delicate process of quarter and half turns.
Dan The Man is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:26 PM
  #10  
20inchesoflove
pedal pusher
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: dirty jersey
Posts: 65

Bikes: a whole lot

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
as a mechanic, this makes me laugh a little, as i see scenarios like this weekly, trust your LBS with you service needs please. it keeps us in business and keeps your bike running properly. keep riding and have fun
20inchesoflove is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:56 PM
  #11  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,112
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Dan The Man View Post
Replacing the broken spoke isn't a big deal either. If it is on the non-drive train side, they can just add a new one in. If it's on the side of your gears and chain, then they need to remove the freewheel to get to the flange where the spoke attaches. That is why they couldn't replace the broken spoke on your old bike. There are destructive methods however, which should have been able to remove that freewheel.
Oh, I get it. By seized they meant they meant they couldn't get the freewheel off.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 03:57 PM
  #12  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,112
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by 20inchesoflove View Post
as a mechanic, this makes me laugh a little, as i see scenarios like this weekly, trust your LBS with you service needs please. it keeps us in business and keeps your bike running properly. keep riding and have fun
Nothing wrong with taking it to an LBS. Nothing wrong with working on your own bike either.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 04:30 PM
  #13  
neil
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Edmonton, Canada
Posts: 736
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
I was trying to true the wheel, and I broke a spoke, not having a broke n spoke, I went to turn my old front wheel into my new rear wheel. I took the axle out and spilled my bearings everywhere. Then I realized I couldn't take the freewheel off anyway, because it needs a special tool.
In order to do this successfully, you would have to remove all the spokes from both wheels and move the hub over to the old front rim. Front and rear rims are the same (though swapping different rims between different bikes means you have to make a lot of other small adjustments to brakes, derailleurs, etc.), but the hubs are different.

Since the hubs are attached to the spokes, moving the hub to avoid replacing a broken spoke is, well, not an efficient use of your time.

However, you do need specialised tools to remove the freewheel (or cassette) from the hub in order to change the spoke, so it's not a straightforward fix you can do unless your toolbox is outfitted for bike repair.

Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
Are you telling me the axle never had to come out? Don't tell my girlfriend that.... Lol. Today is my only day off this week too....
Correct. Axles only come out for hub service (replacing and regreasing the bearings). They're also finicky to put back together, so I wouldn't suggest trying it without some instruction from someone who's done it before. If you do want to give it a shot, you'll need a cone wrench as well as a standard wrench in order to get it adjusted properly.

Don't worry too much about it too much. Chalk it up to a learning experience, and some fun with the new bike. Any local mechanic should be able to have you up and running within a 1/2 hour.
neil is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 04:31 PM
  #14  
Camilo
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,530
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 225 Post(s)
Liked 6 Times in 4 Posts
Yes, put all the parts in a baggie and take it to the LBS. BTDT. Whenever I start a project that I haven't done before, I usually semi-jokingly tell my friend/LBS owner that he may be seeing me in a couple of days with a bag of parts and a red face.
Camilo is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 04:36 PM
  #15  
20inchesoflove
pedal pusher
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: dirty jersey
Posts: 65

Bikes: a whole lot

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
Nothing wrong with taking it to an LBS. Nothing wrong with working on your own bike either.
if you know what you're doing and have the tools

to the OP, go to your shop and ask them if they'll show you how and what basic tools you'll need for your bike.

at my shop we run Park Tool schools twice a year (spring/fall) with classes ranging from basic maintenance to brake bleeding and hub overhauls
20inchesoflove is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:01 PM
  #16  
Andy_K 
Senior Member
 
Andy_K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Beaverton, OR
Posts: 12,031

Bikes: Yes

Mentioned: 282 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1729 Post(s)
Liked 10 Times in 9 Posts
Procedure for learning to be a home mechanic:

1. Try to fix a problem
2. Mess it up worse than when you started
3. Take it to the LBS and have them explain what you did wrong
4. Repeat until step 2 no longer happens

This is pretty standard. Don't let it get you down. A bicycle wheel is pretty simple, but not quite as simple as it appears.
Andy_K is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:11 PM
  #17  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Good news everyone. My father in law stopped by, being an engineer, and got it back together. Still have a broken spoke but my axel and bearings are back in place.
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:12 PM
  #18  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The broken spoke WAS on the drive side, so that's one less thing I have to explain.
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:18 PM
  #19  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,112
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
Good news everyone. My father in law stopped by, being an engineer, and got it back together. Still have a broken spoke but my axel and bearings are back in place.
A farther in law implies a wife. Does she know about the girlfriend? You might just end up wearing that wheel.

Anyway, you might want to have the LBS put in new bearings and re-grease that hub in case any bearings didn't get back in there or some were contaminated. They're not expensive. A few bucks for 150.

Last edited by tjspiel; 04-13-11 at 05:31 PM.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:21 PM
  #20  
Dan The Man
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,215
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
Good news everyone. My father in law stopped by, being an engineer, and got it back together. Still have a broken spoke but my axel and bearings are back in place.
Is your father in law also a cyclist? There are a lot of ways to put together bearings that will wear things out really quickly. Just give it a spin and listen for grinding. If you put your ear to the seat you can hear it really well. When the wheel is in the bike, give the tire a wiggle and see if there is any play in it, it shouldn't feel loose.
Dan The Man is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:24 PM
  #21  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Lmao! Nice catch. No, it's my girlfriend's step dad. I figured Fatherinlaw was easier.

And no. He hasn't been on a bike in over 25 years. I'm not going to ride it until I get up to the LBS anyway. So I'll try to get them to look over it as well. I'm gonna try and find a Co-Op
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:25 PM
  #22  
tjspiel
Senior Member
 
tjspiel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Minneapolis
Posts: 8,112
Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 50 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Andy_K View Post
Procedure for learning to be a home mechanic:

1. Try to fix a problem
2. Mess it up worse than when you started
3. Take it to the LBS and have them explain what you did wrong
4. Repeat until step 2 no longer happens

This is pretty standard. Don't let it get you down. A bicycle wheel is pretty simple, but not quite as simple as it appears.
+1

neotheone took an inventive approach to solving his problem that would seem to make sense without knowing all the little differences between front and rear wheels.
tjspiel is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 05:41 PM
  #23  
neotheone
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 73
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Thanks. I thought I was doing a pretty good job till the bearings went everywhere.

Would it be a bad idea to ride to work for the next say... 4 days, 4 miles each way with a broken spoke? I know last time I rode on a broken spoke after about a week three spokes on the opposite side gave out. But then again that spoke broke completely out of the blue, and I was told to expect more to give out. Since this time itw as entirely my fault will it do any more damage to the bike?
Thanks.
Neo
neotheone is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 06:11 PM
  #24  
Artkansas 
Pedaled too far.
 
Artkansas's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: La Petite Roche
Posts: 12,853
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tjspiel View Post
Nothing wrong with taking it to an LBS. Nothing wrong with working on your own bike either.
But expect to pay extra if you have to take it to an LBS after working on it yourself.
__________________
"He who serves all, best serves himself" Jack London

Originally Posted by Bjforrestal View Post
I don't care if you are on a unicycle, as long as you're not using a motor to get places you get props from me. We're here to support each other. Share ideas, and motivate one another to actually keep doing it.
Artkansas is offline  
Old 04-13-11, 06:11 PM
  #25  
CACycling
Senior Member
 
CACycling's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Oxnard, CA
Posts: 4,564

Bikes: '08 Fuji Roubaix RC; '07 Schwinn Le Tour GS; '92 Diamond Back Ascent EX

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by neotheone View Post
Thanks. I thought I was doing a pretty good job till the bearings went everywhere.

Would it be a bad idea to ride to work for the next say... 4 days, 4 miles each way with a broken spoke? I know last time I rode on a broken spoke after about a week three spokes on the opposite side gave out. But then again that spoke broke completely out of the blue, and I was told to expect more to give out. Since this time itw as entirely my fault will it do any more damage to the bike?
Thanks.
Neo
Probably won't hurt anything but may leave you stranded. I'd skip it till all is fixed. And next time you want to venture into bicycle mechanics, ask questions and read up on it BEFORE picking up any tools.
CACycling is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.