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It's official, MTB's faster...

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It's official, MTB's faster...

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Old 11-01-04, 08:29 AM
  #1  
slvoid
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Hmm, I've been keeping track of the time that it takes me to make the same commute to work on my litespeed firenze with 700x23 135psi slicks and my specialized hardrock with 26x1.5" 80psi semi-slicks. This morning I made it in on the hardrock mtb in 39:47 despite a nice headwind for 1/3rd of the way.
Both weeks the weather was just about equal.

Litespeed:
43:34
44:17
41:38
40:23
Ave: 42.46 minutes.

Specialized:
38:20
41:56
43:12
39:01
Ave: 40.62 minutes.

Might be the fact that I'm more comfortable on the mtb and hop curbs, ram into potholes, take stupid risks, etc.
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Old 11-01-04, 09:00 AM
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Originally Posted by MERTON
yeah.. you might wanna go the same distance with each bike (like using the road the whole way) before comparing them.
Considering I have to go from my house to where I work every day and I travel the same route, I'd say the distance is the same. Only difference is I either slow down for potholes or swerve around em rather than plow through em.
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Old 11-01-04, 09:04 AM
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The Litespeed is obviously slowing your commute and possibly could make you late for work. I suggest you rid yourself of this burden by giving the bike to me.
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Old 11-01-04, 09:17 AM
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I found the same to be true. When I switched to my new full time commuter with 700x25 110psi from my MTB with 1.25" 85psi slicks plus the weight of front suspension my average speed dropped by 1mph

I attribute the change to 2 things: I am actually more aero on my MTB. The reach is longer and the seat is higher in comparison with the handle bars. (I also get very numb hands after riding for 15minutes! It doesn’t seem to bother me when I am off road?) The second is riding style... Based on the wider spread gear selection I tend to mash more on my mountain bike and spin on the road. After the first 30 minutes I would be willing to bet I would be faster on my road bike, but I don't have data to supports that.

I don't have obstacles or stop signs/lights on my commute, just flat gently rolling hills and wind. I know my acceleration is much better on my road bike, but that really doesn't come into play on my commute.

It made me question the justification for purchasing my new bike… for about a nanosecond!
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Old 11-01-04, 09:57 AM
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If you commute involves a lot of stop-and-go for traffic lights and so on, the closer gear ratios and probably stronger brakes on your mountain bike probably help you stay at speed longer. Other things that might help your sampling would be riding each bike on alternating days rather than a week at a time; that would help even out external factors like your nutrition, rest, fatique and so on.
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Old 11-01-04, 03:06 PM
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Originally Posted by MERTON
yeah.. you might wanna go the same distance with each bike (like using the road the whole way) before comparing them.
au contraire! If the goal is to determine which bike is faster, he needs to ride each bike the way he'd ride it every day. If that means the mtn bike gets to cheat cutting through a pothole filled alley, so be it!
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Old 11-01-04, 03:07 PM
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The road bike is slower because drop handlebars are ********. I suppose that they are great for long journeys and spandex geeks who spin at 500rpm, but in stop-and-go traffic, you need wide handlebars (and/or a rohloff speedhub) to get yourself up to speed with the cars.

Your best bet in commuting is wide, no-drop TT bars, with barend shifters and brake levers on the bottom. If you have a steel frame and 25+ width tires, you can mash right into the potholes--just get off the saddle for a second.

Yet more blasphemy: Biopace chainrings are GREAT for city.
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Old 11-01-04, 03:36 PM
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mynameisnotdrew, methinks you're crazy. Not all commutes are created equal, and not all bikes are created equal (drop bars or not) so the bike that is perfect for one commute isn't quite so perfect for another. And I rarely spin at 500 rpm, even if I am wearing spandex. 120 is usually sufficient.
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Old 11-01-04, 03:57 PM
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Funny, I don't see many sprinters at the velodrome using straight bars lately...
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Old 11-01-04, 04:02 PM
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Both weeks the weather was just about equal.

I have lived here in KS for 35 years and i don't think we have ever had two weeks together where the weather was "equal." I'm not arguing your results because i have no way of knowing whether they are accurate or not.

I do think that one needs to consider the weather, specifically wind, can make good differences in your times.
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Old 11-01-04, 04:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Ranger
I have lived here in KS for 35 years and i don't think we have ever had two weeks together where the weather was "equal." I'm not arguing your results because i have no way of knowing whether they are accurate or not.

I do think that one needs to consider the weather, specifically wind, can make good differences in your times.
The wind was pretty much the same. I've had the same experiences (which I posted in an earlier thread) with my old road bike too. My mtb still is the quickest way for me and it's probably due to the fact that I can afford to be more reckless on the mtb than on the road bike in the city.
I'm pretty sure out in the country on the open road, I can average 22+mph while I can only pull around 20 on the mtb.
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Old 11-01-04, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by ajkloss42
mynameisnotdrew, methinks you're crazy. Not all commutes are created equal, and not all bikes are created equal (drop bars or not) so the bike that is perfect for one commute isn't quite so perfect for another. And I rarely spin at 500 rpm, even if I am wearing spandex. 120 is usually sufficient.
I'm pretty sure, I hope anyway, 500rpm's an exaggration.
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Old 11-03-04, 12:53 PM
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Me too I dont know why either but my 10 mile commute I have posted faster times on my home grown than my allez road bike
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Old 11-03-04, 01:14 PM
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Originally Posted by mynameisnotdrew
The road bike is slower because drop handlebars are ********. I suppose that they are great for long journeys and spandex geeks who spin at 500rpm, but in stop-and-go traffic, you need wide handlebars (and/or a rohloff speedhub) to get yourself up to speed with the cars.

Your best bet in commuting is wide, no-drop TT bars, with barend shifters and brake levers on the bottom. If you have a steel frame and 25+ width tires, you can mash right into the potholes--just get off the saddle for a second.

Yet more blasphemy: Biopace chainrings are GREAT for city.
I jump stuff, ram into things and fly off of things on my bike with drops.
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Old 11-03-04, 01:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Phiber
I jump stuff, ram into things and fly off of things on my bike with drops.
Me too. Rock on.
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Old 11-03-04, 04:42 PM
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My commute is significatly faster on a road bike... reason is I can get to speed and hold it more because of the logn stretches. For stop and go the bike does not matter. I am more areo on a road bike and thus quicker...
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Old 11-03-04, 07:37 PM
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I noticed this too, on stop and go traffic, the mtn bike IS faster, due to lower gear ratios, allowing you to get up to speed with less difficulty, as well as the riding position allows for you to start off strong in road conditions where you have to be more gentle on a roadbike, such as uneven pavement. Oh, and the ability to just plow through crap helps as well

...but, on a long stretch of road, with little to no stops, a roadbike will be faster.
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Old 11-03-04, 08:18 PM
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I've noticed the same thing. On my stop-and-go commute, my internally geared commuter bike is fastest, my hybrid second fastest, and my wife's road bike slowest. There is one section where I can get down in the drops and really whiz for about a half mile nonstop, clearly outdoing anything else. However, it is still slowest overall. Horses for courses, and all that.

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