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Do Sprung Leather Saddles make sense?

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Do Sprung Leather Saddles make sense?

Old 09-01-11, 04:20 PM
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adlai
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Do Sprung Leather Saddles make sense?

I have a cyclocross and a fixie bike. On the CX bike the frame is larger so the saddle tends to be about even with the handlebars. On the fixie the frame is smaller so the saddle is higher up.

Eh?
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Old 09-01-11, 05:44 PM
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It would be unusual to use a sprung saddle on those bikes, but to each their own. What do you mean by "do they make sense?"
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Old 09-01-11, 07:01 PM
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If my saddle ever made sense, I'd check myself into the loony bin.
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Old 09-01-11, 07:50 PM
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I had a Brooks Conquest for a while but didn't notice any difference. When I asked a Brooks rep/dealer he told me they actually do best if the rider is over 200lbs (to get the springs to actually spring).

I'm a lightweight...
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Old 09-01-11, 08:05 PM
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Sure they do, especially for touring bikes. For commuting I don't think it makes a big difference either way.
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Old 09-01-11, 08:37 PM
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I tried one, but sold it after a few hundred miles. I felt like it ruined my cadence as I started to bounce. Yea, I could have used a lower gear and better rotation technique. But I'm a masher

With the above said, a lot of folks like them. I have seen many used over the years and the guy who bought mine loves it. The springs are pretty stiff, so you need some bulk to make them work. If you have any specific questions you should e-mail wallingford bicycles. They seem to be the Brooks saddle experts.

If that won't work for you, consider a suspension seat post.
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Old 09-02-11, 03:03 AM
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I tried one, but sold it after a few hundred miles. I felt like it ruined my cadence as I started to bounce. Yea, I could have used a lower gear and better rotation technique. But I'm a masher
You're a "masher" and have issues bouncing?

I ride a b67 (which is sprung) on a bike with the saddle and bars even. Folks recommended the b17 but after riding one for about 800 miles it was just killing me. The b67 is usually advised for "upright" positions, but I've found it extremely comfortable for my more level position as well. The saddle tapers so sharply that I don't have thigh rub or anything. I hear people talk about bouncing a lot with sprung saddles, but I have no idea how they accomplish that. The tension of the springs is pretty tight, so it's not like you're sitting on a trampoline or something.

My sit bones are too wide for a b17 -- so yeah, they make sense if they fit you. If you already like your current saddle, it may not make sense to spend the $.

Sure they do, especially for touring bikes. For commuting I don't think it makes a big difference either way.
Having a comfortable saddle all the time is ideal for me --- regardless of whether I'm touring or commuting or whatever.

Last edited by TurbineBlade; 09-02-11 at 03:07 AM.
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Old 09-02-11, 09:37 AM
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I have a B17 on one bike and whatever the equivalent is to the b17 with springs. They're on different bikes so hard to compare ride directly, but I don't find the sprung saddle too bouncy. The sprung saddle is on my commuter (12 miles one way, London roads...), for that bit of extra cushion when I space out and hit some dip in the road unawares. I'm glad I got it, but as I said, I don't feel a huge difference with the regular b17.
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Old 09-02-11, 09:53 AM
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A B72 might be a good compromise between the B17 and B67. It's wide like the B67, but has a 'dual coiled' rail system which has some spring. Mine's on my touring bike and works really well for that purpose. I'm sure it would work for commuter/utility uses too. My regular commuter has a narrow mtb seat that came w/t bike. Some generic Pac-Rim knockoff of a Selle, but it's held up well and does it's job. Got the bike in May of 2008. My fg commuter has one of those old Specialized 'split rear' channeled, wide mtb saddles. Don't know the model. Well over 10 years old, though. It's great.
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Old 09-02-11, 10:14 AM
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I removed my Brooks Conquest because it would bounce at high cadence when used on my rigid MTB converted to a commuter. I weighed about 200 lbs at the time and think the upright riding position of the MTB/Commuter conversion contributed to the bouncing problem.
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Old 09-02-11, 02:42 PM
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I have a Brooks Flyer (the spring B17) on my folding commuter. The top of the saddle is the same height as the handlebars, and I weigh 185 or so. The saddle is heaven; it takes the sharp jolt out of road irregularities.

If you aren't sure, buy it at http://wallbike.com/. There's a 6-month satisfaction guaranty on their brooks saddles, and good customer service too.

-Warr
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Old 09-02-11, 02:55 PM
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Do you race? (I presume you don't.)
Do you care about light weight and getting the saddle muddy/wet?

I like the Brooks Flyer.
It adds a little cushion on bumpy dirt roads and trails, and if you are heavy (180+) it is good too.
The cross tires have only so much cushion, so being overweight for my height (200+) I like them.
The weight I could lose is more reasonable get rid of than the weight of the saddle.
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Old 09-02-11, 03:32 PM
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Originally Posted by TurbineBlade View Post
Having a comfortable saddle all the time is ideal for me --- regardless of whether I'm touring or commuting or whatever.
Sure, but since most commutes are probably under an hour, that's not really enough time for the saddle to have a huge impact. When you are on the bike 7hrs a day, that's when all those little bumps in the road have sort of an cumulative effect and the springs really help out.
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Old 09-27-11, 03:57 PM
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Well, I am about 160-170 lbs.

and I've been eyeing this saddle for a while

http://www.crowcycleco.com/gyes/gyes...d-springs.html

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Old 09-27-11, 04:11 PM
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It's a little extra weight but for commuting, I don't think it makes a huge difference. Also, I've definitely noticed it has saved my ass from some pain on really rough roads, the kind I try to avoid unless it's my first time riding it like on a tour. I like to think the springs soften the occasional pothole or high drive-way ramp. Personally, I like it.

What kind of riding do you intend to do with it? There might be something more suited to your riding style.
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Old 09-27-11, 05:14 PM
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Well, the weight argument on the bike was lost a long long time ago when I put on fenders and the rear rack.

But man, the thing is a little too much 75 bucks shipped.
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Old 09-27-11, 09:39 PM
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the Brooks Flyer I have now is 6oz heavier than the B17. Brooks Flyer is 1lb and 14oz (860g); B17 is 1lb and 2oz (520g). Significant, no? Well, when you throw on a rack and whatever else for commuting, I guess it doesn't make a huge difference, right?
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Old 09-28-11, 05:22 AM
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I certainly like them.I use a Velo Orange on my daily commuter

and a Brooks on my touring bike

I like the way they squeek, letting me know they are working for me!

Marc
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Old 09-29-11, 06:47 AM
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I had a Flyer for a while. I got rid of it. The weight wasn't an issue, but at certain cadences I would get this bouncing going, and I really dislike that. It's pretty easy to stop the bounce --changing gears, or coasting for a few seconds-- but sometimes you just don't have that luxury. As for smoothing out the bumps, that's not an issue if you see the bumps coming. I can imagine the Flyer (or similar) would be nice for the stoker on a tandem, who can't see the bumps coming. For the rest of us, I don't see the point.
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Old 10-03-11, 11:43 AM
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I have a Flyer on my commuter bike, handlebars are well below the seat level and I have no issues with comfort. Our streets are quite potholed and I don't always see all of them so I definitely like having the springs. I do get some bounce when I start mashing at high cadences but that just tells me I should be spinning instead.
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