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Nashbar pannier owners - I have a question for you

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Nashbar pannier owners - I have a question for you

Old 09-07-11, 03:08 PM
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kiltedcelt
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Nashbar pannier owners - I have a question for you

I'm looking to get some of the inexpensive Nashbar panniers - either these:

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_165648_-1___

or

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_172282_-1___

or (not Nashbar but still darned inexpensive!)

http://www.performancebike.com/bikes..._1091739_-1___

Anyway, I'm wondering how well these will work for carrying some groceries. Our local grocery store is really close to the house - only about 4 blocks so hardly a couple minutes of riding. I do like to hit the Whole Paycheck once in a while though and that is more an extra mile or so out of the way on the commute home. The heaviest things I'd be carrying might be a gallon of milk or a six pack of beer. I'd be getting a pair of panniers too, so that I could balance loads out on both sides.
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Old 09-07-11, 03:37 PM
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Leisesturm
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4 blocks? I would walk. I still have my shopping cart, the two wheeled kind, from when I lived in NYC. When I was a kid you carried food in them. In the 80's people carried laundry in them. They kind of went out of fashion in the 90's but you can still find them. Under $20 and it will carry what would take a half dozen of those Nashbar panniers. For the longer run I would strongly consider a trailer. You'd need at least two panniers so double the price posted. Maybe you have a rack already but for what a Nashbar trailer costs... I'd be all over it.

H
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Old 09-07-11, 04:12 PM
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I have the ATB panniers. I got them for touring/overnights. I will occasionally throw them on for a day trip where I might want to carry a lot, but generally I would not consider them ideal for grocery shopping. Empty, they are a little floppy, and in spite of the hard back, I find that I have to take precautions to keep them from getting into the spokes. I also don't trust them to stay on the rack without employing the velcro retention strap, which I find to be a pain to deal with if you're taking them on and off. I don't know that you would be taking them on and off, but since they're not shaped to take a grocery bag, it seems like the best bet might be to take them in and bag the groceries directly in to them, except I prefer to leave them on the bike while I'm using them.

They are very roomy, though, so if that's your biggest criteria, they may get the job done. Some of that room is in the side compartments, though, so if you're carrying a full load, you may find yourself squirreling away some items in separate pockets.

For grocery stops, while I seldom load up on groceries on my bike, I think my preference would be grocery bag panniers. Just drop your bags in and go. Each pannier takes one brown, paper bag, so if you have more then that, you might need other options. If I wanted more carrying capacity, I think I'd use a basket along with the panniers, if possible putting the panniers at one end of the bike and the basket at the other. I have a basket that attaches to my rear rack, so I've been known to use that in combination with grocery bag panniers on the front. Of course four panniers would give you even more capacity, but if I filled four panniers with groceries, I might not make up the hill on the way home.
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Old 09-07-11, 05:41 PM
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I have the Nashbar ATB panniers, also. I agree with Rob_E, for the most part. They're fine panniers, but I don't know hust how much groceries you're going to get in them. I've managed to take home 3-4 plastic grocery bags full, but the items can't be very big and I have to get creative about how I load the panniers. My set cost me twenty bucks several years ago, and they have held up fine.
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Old 09-07-11, 05:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Leisesturm View Post
4 blocks? I would walk. I still have my shopping cart, the two wheeled kind, from when I lived in NYC. When I was a kid you carried food in them. In the 80's people carried laundry in them. They kind of went out of fashion in the 90's but you can still find them. Under $20 and it will carry what would take a half dozen of those Nashbar panniers. For the longer run I would strongly consider a trailer. You'd need at least two panniers so double the price posted. Maybe you have a rack already but for what a Nashbar trailer costs... I'd be all over it.

H
I'm not necessarily intending to make that 4 block run on the bike but instead maybe stop over at the store on my way home from work. With the two panniers I could load up on some groceries and head home from there. But yeah, I'm not breaking out the bike just to ride to the store. I usually just walk and get only what I can carry back in two bags.
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Old 09-07-11, 05:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Rob_E View Post
For grocery stops, while I seldom load up on groceries on my bike, I think my preference would be grocery bag panniers. Just drop your bags in and go. Each pannier takes one brown, paper bag, so if you have more then that, you might need other options. If I wanted more carrying capacity, I think I'd use a basket along with the panniers, if possible putting the panniers at one end of the bike and the basket at the other. I have a basket that attaches to my rear rack, so I've been known to use that in combination with grocery bag panniers on the front. Of course four panniers would give you even more capacity, but if I filled four panniers with groceries, I might not make up the hill on the way home.
See my above reply about stopping after work. I'm not necessarily looking to carry a LOT of groceries in the panniers but be able to get some stuff in them like a six pack and maybe a half gallon of milk (instead of a full gallon), along with other stuff. I ideally I'm looking for panniers that can do double duty to carry my work stuff but be there to carry some groceries as well. Of course I could always just get the grocery bag holder panniers and make a dedicated trip to the store to really stock up. It sounds like the basic Nashbar panniers will hold a few items but that you're not going to want to use them for hauling anything other than a few odds and ends from the store.
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Old 09-07-11, 06:15 PM
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I have a set of the waterproof panniers: http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product...2_172282_-1___
and they're great. You don't want to know what I paid for them though...
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Old 09-07-11, 06:24 PM
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I also have the Nashbar 'Waterproof' panniers. Bought them primarily for bike camping trips but they have also worked fine for grocery runs. I've carried up to 6 2-liter bottles (almost 27 lbs) per side without any issues. The single large compartment works well for bigger items like gallon milk containers. Watch for sales - the price varies considerably and is sometimes below $30.
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Old 09-08-11, 07:49 AM
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Originally Posted by kiltedcelt View Post
See my above reply about stopping after work. I'm not necessarily looking to carry a LOT of groceries in the panniers but be able to get some stuff in them like a six pack and maybe a half gallon of milk (instead of a full gallon), along with other stuff. I ideally I'm looking for panniers that can do double duty to carry my work stuff but be there to carry some groceries as well. Of course I could always just get the grocery bag holder panniers and make a dedicated trip to the store to really stock up. It sounds like the basic Nashbar panniers will hold a few items but that you're not going to want to use them for hauling anything other than a few odds and ends from the store.
Then space may not be an issue, but my concerns still hold about other aspects of the bags. I found them to be great for touring, overnights, and long day trips. Put them on at the beginning of the ride, adjust them, take them off at the end. If you're going to leave them on your bike, that's one thing. I don't leave any bags on my bike while I'm at work, so I've never commuted with them because I have other options that are easier to work with. I have used my bags for some light grocery shopping, but only because I didn't have anything else handy. My problem using them in that capacity is that you either have to remove them at your stop (which is a pain) or you have to trust that they'll be there when you get back. Also I find that they work best when you use the cinch straps to keep your load tight, otherwise they can be a little floppy. When they're empty, they are very floppy no matter what. I couldn't keep the bag from hitting the spokes when on the front rack. On the back rack, they were not as troublesome because of the shape of the rear rack. Even so, I'd say these run better with a load then empty, which is why I find them far more useful on longer trips where I don't expect my load to vary greatly.

For light grocery shopping, my current solution is my wire, Topeak basket. Usually it holds my satchel with all my work gear, but if I need to pick up a few things, I throw the satchel over my shoulder and put my groceries in the basket. A half gallon of milk and a six pack would be no problem. Before that, and hopefully in the future, my preferred method was a Topeak trunk rack with fold out panniers. All my daily work gear fit in the trunk bag, and if I needed a grocery stop on the way home, I folded out the panniers. With this set-up, too, a half gallon of milk and a six pack wouldn't be a problem. I liked this approach because the panniers were not even there when you didn't need them, but easily deployed when you did. And without the panniers deployed, the trunk slid right off the corresponding Topeak rack, so it was quick and easy to take with me. I stopped using it because my work gear grew to exceed the trunk portion of the bag, and having the panniers deployed all the time meant no more easy-on/easy-off. I plan to upgrade to the larger size bag in the near future.

I like my ATB bags for what I use them for, and they would probably work for what you want them for, but they wouldn't be my first choice for commuting/grocery runs.
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Old 09-08-11, 01:48 PM
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I've used the Nashbar waterproof for touring and for groceries. They work fine though they are a little floppy. I usually bring my bike in the store and load the panniers as I shop. For the times when I leave the bike outside, the panniers come off the racks easily and I mount them inside the carriage, loading as I go.

BTW, the price is for a pair, not a single as someone suggested.
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Old 09-08-11, 05:11 PM
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I have used a set of the Nashbar ATB panniers for commuting and one multiple day tour and they have been very good. Three plus years and thousands of miles and still going strong.
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Old 09-08-11, 05:14 PM
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I use the ATB for grocery shopping sometimes. They work fine. They aren't super convenient (you have to do a bit of rearranging), but they can easily fit a week's worth of groceries for a 3000 calorie a day eater.
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Old 09-08-11, 07:50 PM
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I have both the ATB and Waterproof Nashbar bags. The waterproof bags hold a heck of a lot more and have added security of velcro straps to reenforce the simple hooks on the top of the rack. I've had the ATBs bounce one of the top hooks off the rack before. All in all, I like and use both.
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Old 09-08-11, 08:12 PM
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Cheap grocery hauler

I have the Nashbar pantiers and they have worked well for me. But, if you already have a back rack, a milk carton and zip ties would also get the job done.
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Old 09-08-11, 08:14 PM
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Cheap grocery hauler

I have the Nashbar panniers and they have worked well for me. But, if you already have a back rack, a milk carton and zip ties would also get the job done.
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Old 09-08-11, 08:44 PM
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I have the ATBs too and they work just fine for me for shopping. Each will hold about one plastic grocery bag. I also have a bungee cargo net which allows me to hold a bit more. I got them for $19.99. Maybe they'll go on sale again.

The bags have two hooks on top to hold them on and a bungee with a hook on the bottom. I understand what Rob_E meant when he said they didn't trust them without the velcro, but I don't use the velcro and I've never had a problem. I find them super easy to get on and off.

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Old 09-09-11, 09:56 AM
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Okay, so these are getting a lot more favorable reviews that I thought initially. Both types sound like really decent panniers. I'm betting that with some creativity and a couple thin sheets of expanded pvc sheet (trade name Sintra), I could buy a set of either and stiffen the wheel side of them to all but eliminate the floppiness that's been mentioned. I'm really wanting to get some panniers because I'm already finding that my current set up of a Transit trunk bag is not leaving me enough space for everything I might need to carry with me. It'll hold my lunch, a book, and a few other items but that's about it. I'm thinking that as we start moving into fall and winter I'll need to be able to carry some extra clothing items that might or might not be needed for that days commute. Things like a waterproof jacket and pants or perhaps an extra layer like arm and leg warmers, that sort of thing. I simply won't have the space with my current trunk bag so panniers seem like the way to go. Also, I'd like to be able to just cruise by the grocery store on the way home if I need to grab a few items. Sounds like these panniers will do the trick. Now to just start watching for the specials and sales.
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Old 09-12-11, 11:12 AM
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I've used the ATB's a few times for shopping. They hold more than my backpack will, and fit nicely in the shopping cart (turned so they are hanging inside the cart). This allows me to avoid buying more than I can carry home. I mainly use 1 for commuting, and they work great for that.
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