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Good Budget Saddles

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Good Budget Saddles

Old 08-16-12, 09:44 PM
  #26  
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Originally Posted by 009jim View Post
... but it has a cutout for your equipment...
I may be going out on a limb here but I don't think Sweetnightmare has the 'hangdown' or sort of equipment you and I may concern ourselves with:
Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
.... I'd be more comfortable sitting on the top tube if it weren't a women's bike.
Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
... I think the stock saddle is too narrow, cause it's the women's bike and many experienced women's cyclists have reported it being a torture device in saddle form...
Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
I'm actually going to run up to Performance tomorrow and see if they have the forte ladies soft tail in stock for me to try...
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Old 08-16-12, 10:01 PM
  #27  
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Haha, indeed I'm a lady and don't have any dangly parts to worry about. So just making sure I don't add my behind to the list of things that hurt like crazy when I get off work. Anyways, I'll try the Forte, I've heard good things about the brand. Hopefully the feel is right. My commute's only around two miles, so I'm not worries about distance comfort yet. If I become unhappy with a softer saddle, I'll swap it for something else or put the torture device back on.
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Old 08-16-12, 10:29 PM
  #28  
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seems I have a very wide butt. . . . . I might go with a cushy Bell saddle just because it seems so many saddles are just so thin!
Sounds like you are quite new to cycling. Like any other new activity, there will be some soreness until you get used to it. I would also like to point out a couple of problems with your statement above. Saddle width is determined by the width of your pelvis, specifically the distance between your ischial tuberosities (aka, sit bones). The width of the soft tissue is irrelevant. The idea of a "cushy" saddle is also misleading as excessive cushioning actually shifts your weight off your sit bones and redistributes it to your personal parts (women too) and the inside of your thighs where it causes compression of blood vessles and nerves. I'm a clyde and one of the best pieces of advice I got when I started was "If your thighs already rub together, the last thing you need is to wedge a big chunk of foam rubber in there". Another pearl of wisdom I was given was "It's a bike, not a bar stool".

A bit of fairly firm padding to limit point tenderness is good, too much is worse than too little. Also avoid seats with excessively soft gels for padding, what padding there is should be fairly firm. The same goes for bike shorts. The chamois' primary function is to prevent friction, a few mm of well designed padding is OK, but if it feels like you are wearing a diaper, it's too much.

Find someone who can help you get a proper bike fitting. Fit is 90% of bike comfort (and 87.3% of all statistics are fabricated on the spot). Bike shops generally do this for free on bikes they sell, but they charge for fittings on other bikes. If you have a friend who is a cyclist, he/she may be able to help. There are also some good references online. Park Tools or Sheldon Brown's websites are good places to start. Bicycle Magazine also has some online bike videos including one on basic fit. It is amazing how having your seat just a few cm too high, too low, or too far forward or back can make a huge difference. Proper seat leveling and handlebar position can also an impact on riding position and thus on comfort.

As you ride, your backside will toughen up. Too many people immediately throw down bucks for a "comfort" seat that a few months later they regret. You may want a new seat at some time, but give yourself some time to get used to riding.

When you do decide to swap, watch your local bike shop for factory original seats that are pretty much new but previously installed. These typically come off of new bikes when a customer want to swap for something else right away. I've picked up a handful of Bontrager (Trek) and other brand seats for $5 - $10. Even a factory original from an entry level, brand name bike is probably better designed than the seat on a bike from a big box store. I've got one of those $5 like-new seats on my road bike right now and I find it comfortable for rides of up to a couple of hours and have never developed saddle sores or other problems from it. Expensive doesn't always mean better. It's important to find what works for you. Advice on specific seats from others needs to be taken with a grain of salt as what works for someone else might not be the best choice for you.
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Old 08-16-12, 10:38 PM
  #29  
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I only referenced the cushy bells because they're wider in the back. I feel like I'm sitting on the stem post by itself. I've got major pain right under those sit bones too, it's awful, and I haven't even gotten on the bike today if that tells you how bad it is.

If it helps anyone, my bike is a WalBike I got for free for my birthday yesterday. It's one of the cheapest models too. So I'm expecting to need to change out...well, everything eventually. Pedals, grips, saddle, probably brakes, get some bar ends, already added three lights to the bike itself, two to my helmet, swap out tires for slicks and eventually tubes as well. I'm not one to take a gift lightly, so I figure the best way to be grateful for this bike is to use it as much as I possibly can before it gives out completely. Besides, at least I'll learn the different bike parts while replacing them all. xD
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Old 08-17-12, 07:57 AM
  #30  
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If you are new to cycling, you also might want to find a bike shop that will let you try different saddles and return them if they don't fit. Some shops also have loaner saddles they will let you test out. My suggestion about eBay is probably more helpful for someone who has a good idea about which saddles will fit them, but can also be useful for trying out various models. If you only pay $20 with shipping for a saddle, it should be easy to resell for about the same amount. I tried a number of different saddles that way myself when trying to find a model that fit me best. No point paying full retail price for a saddle that may or may not fit.
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Old 08-17-12, 11:45 AM
  #31  
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So, despite my fear of not being able to touch the ground when I need to stop from the seat, as I always did as a child, I raised the saddle a few centimeters. After about five minutes of riding like that, I felt instantly better. Maybe I was just riding too low. My rear will give you all a full report later on if it worked. xD
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Old 08-17-12, 11:52 AM
  #32  
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Originally Posted by newkie View Post
Just to play devil's advocate on your budget. Try to equate your saddle to a new pair of shoes. You'd spend a reasonable amount for good shoes, right? Well why not your saddle? Especially when your saddle will last 10 years while your shoes will last only 1.

This is how I talked myself in to a Brooks and I'm glad I did!
Exactly right. Brooks, B66/67 of B73, whatever the price, is worth it to to convert your cycling pain into an enjoyable experience. If there is a budget way to accomplish the same I am not aware of it. Spend the money or save up for it until you can; it is worth it.
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Old 08-17-12, 11:56 AM
  #33  
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The saddle you want will depend on how you ride your bike and the one you want might change as you spend more time riding.

If your bike is geared toward sitting bolt upright, you might definitely want to focus on getting it wide enough to hold you up and some cush might not do much harm.

The farther forward you tilt when riding, the more you shift weight from your butt to your legs on the pedals, and the less saddle you need (and the less cush on the saddle you will want).

The more you ride and the more you get your legs and lungs conditioned to riding, the more your legs will be holding you up and the less your butt, so again the less saddle you will need and the less cushion.

Between nashbar and performance you can get a saddle at any point along the spectrums of cushion, width, both, neither for probably not too much money.
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Old 08-17-12, 02:25 PM
  #34  
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So, despite my fear of not being able to touch the ground when I need to stop from the seat, as I always did as a child,
Crank forward frame designs accommodate that need.. a quite low seat angle..
so leg extension is good, but the extension is forward , so the saddle is closer to the ground.
when you stop, and put a foot down..

then Wide saddles are the thing..
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Old 08-17-12, 05:23 PM
  #35  
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Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
So, despite my fear of not being able to touch the ground when I need to stop from the seat, as I always did as a child, I raised the saddle a few centimeters. After about five minutes of riding like that, I felt instantly better. Maybe I was just riding too low. My rear will give you all a full report later on if it worked. xD
Hope this works for you. In time and with practice you'll learn to keep your butt on the saddle yet be able to extend one of your legs and touch down on tippy toes. This can be helpful when you're riding in the rain and want to keep your saddle dry. My MTB commuter has a bottom bracket height of 12"... the saddle is 42.5" from the ground yet although my inseam is only 33", I can remain seated while stopped.
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Old 08-17-12, 07:42 PM
  #36  
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Originally Posted by zonatandem View Post
Skip the cushy saddles; ride a hard saddle and develop a tougher/harder butt.
+1. This is the correct answer for both men and women except that you don't have to have a tougher butt. Smooth, firm saddles are more comfortable than spongy saddles from the beginning and, if leather, get even better with time. If you need more shock absorbtion, get a saddle with springs.

This is what I believe to be one of the best, if not THE best womens saddle available; the Brooks B-18 saddle. Comfortable, beautiful, ventilated, smooth, slightly wide, modestly sprung:

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Old 08-17-12, 08:32 PM
  #37  
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Getting as close to properly fitted on the bike should really make a difference (as you've already noticed). Although this is an article about Selle SMP saddles, the first part should be helpful explaining why a wide saddle is not necessarily your best bet, even as a women. Too much cushioning is definitely problematic as it will push on sensitive areas. I don't agree with the advice to go and try out saddles at the store. Just like shoes, saddles take a little while for your body to adapt to and possibly for the saddle itself to break in. If you can find a store with a good return policy on saddles, that would be ideal.
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Old 08-17-12, 09:34 PM
  #38  
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So, went to Performance, decided not to get a new saddle. Got a decent lock instead, Onguard Mini Bulldog with cable. ((I've been using a cheapo Bell cable lock.)) I figured if it's going to be my main mode of transportation, I need to be able to really secure it.
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Old 08-18-12, 03:17 PM
  #39  
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I use an Origin 8 Classic Lite Saddle. Looks classy on my San Jose and is comfortable in both bike shorts or khakis.
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Old 08-19-12, 04:07 AM
  #40  
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Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
So, went to Performance, decided not to get a new saddle. Got a decent lock instead, Onguard Mini Bulldog with cable. ((I've been using a cheapo Bell cable lock.)) I figured if it's going to be my main mode of transportation, I need to be able to really secure it.
I suppose.... If your bike is uncomfortable to ride, it might spend a lot of time in the garage and you could have saved the money you spent on the lock!
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Old 08-19-12, 08:14 AM
  #41  
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Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
So, went to Performance, decided not to get a new saddle. Got a decent lock instead, Onguard Mini Bulldog with cable. ((I've been using a cheapo Bell cable lock.)) I figured if it's going to be my main mode of transportation, I need to be able to really secure it.
That is one unique way of solving your uncomfortable saddle issue.Lock it in a safe place and don't ride it anymore. Next time ask about good locks to buy; I'll remember to recommend buying a Wald basket.
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Old 08-19-12, 12:45 PM
  #42  
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I decided to wait to see if my rear gets used to riding and it turns out it's not uncomfortable. I'm still riding, no worries there. The lock was marked down to 25, an excellent price for how much lock I got. Really the only point of a lock is intimidation: if someone really wants my bike, they're going to get it. If when I get paid my rear is still hurting, then I'll get a new saddle. If not, then I'll get some slicks for the bike, a pump, and perhaps a multitool if I get paid enough.
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Old 08-19-12, 03:44 PM
  #43  
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Originally Posted by SweetNightmare View Post
I decided to wait to see if my rear gets used to riding and it turns out it's not uncomfortable. I'm still riding, no worries there...
It makes sense to buy a lock and keep riding to see if you get used to your saddle. It sure beats getting a new saddle you like and then have it and your new bike get stolen.
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