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I need help Guys, New here

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I need help Guys, New here

Old 10-23-12, 11:54 AM
  #1  
mikemartin
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I need help Guys, New here

I have a 2002 Trek 7500, it's completely stock. I want to upgrade the components But don't know what's worth it, what's not, reputable companies,etc. Also my front fork disc brake compatible is it a worthwhile upgrade for casual riding. I'm not out to win any races, I just want a good reliable (and fast) bike.

Here is the fact sheet for my bike http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...e#.UIbPzsXA8Yk

Some facts about my riding conditions:

Im a big guy around 265lbs, so durability is a factor, but my main goals with this bike is speed, and efficiency

My bike is my main source of transportation, I do at least 10 miles a day to get back and forth from work.

I generally stay in the 15 - 20mph range

Our weather is generally nice, a few rain and snow storms but nothing extreme, not a lot of dust or dirt. I always ride on the road.

There are no problems with the bike, except an untrue rear wheel. Everything rides nicely

Last tune up was a year ago.
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Old 10-23-12, 12:18 PM
  #2  
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1. Got a 404 error when I clicked on your link
2. Get that wheel trued ASAP.
3. If you're cranking out 20 mph on with that upright geometry that is usual for the Trek 7xxx line, you are doing good.

You may or may not see any performance gains with component upgrades to your bike, due to the geometry. Then again, you may or may not see any performance gains if you acquire something that puts you into a more aggressive posture, based upon your fitness level.

Yeah, that's about as helpful as blowing your paycheck on a stripper and coming away with a case of blue balls...
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Old 10-23-12, 12:22 PM
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mikemartin
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Sorry, here you go. http://www.bikepedia.com/QuickBike/B...e#.UIbhAMXA8Yk
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Old 10-23-12, 12:44 PM
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hubcap
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I wouldn't put a lot of money into upgrading that bike to try increasing speed. There are a lot of things you could do to lighten it up, but it can start getting expensive. Are you going to be happy with a mass market hybrid with some more expensive components? Keep the drivetrain clean and running efficiently, keep appropriate pressure in your tires, work on the motor, maybe dump the suspension fork. You are already riding reasonably fast for that bike. If you feel you need to be still faster, I say time to think about a different bike.
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Old 10-23-12, 12:52 PM
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The best upgrade for just about any bike is with the tires. They can make a big difference.
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Old 10-23-12, 12:55 PM
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Did you pay list for that bike? If you even paid 1/2 of list, you IMO have way too much money invested to do extensive upgrading which will not, IMO offer any advantge. The good news: 700C wheels. Yay. Change the tires to something smaller (28mm) and higher pressure (100psi) and call it good. If you must. Change the crankset for something with road gearing (30-39-50/52) and call it very good. Don't go crazy, look for a sale at Nashbar or something. Finally, if you really must, change the rear cassette for a road standard 11 - 25 or 11 - 28 but... bigger guy like yourself, you might appreciate the 11 - 32's generous granny option more than you ealize once its gone. OR you might want to think completely outside the box and go for the road bike your inner you know who is trying to channel. Used is one option but closeouts on new ones are available. Steel is making a comeback and retro steel road bikes are available fully equipped for $300+. I couldn't live with only one bike. I don't see how you can. Get a backup road bike and call it very, very, good.

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Old 10-23-12, 01:04 PM
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mikemartin
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Actually I have gotten the bike for free. My father moved out of state and couldn't take the bike with him. So he gave me his 2002 trek and got himself a 2011 trek 7500. I have no money invested the bike besides tune ups, maintenance, and fixing a few flat tires.
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Old 10-23-12, 01:27 PM
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I don't understand what your problem with the bike is. It sounds like you are happy and riding it well.
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Old 10-23-12, 01:35 PM
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mikemartin
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I love the bike and it is a joy to ride, I just want to know what I can do to maximize performance, on it. Also It's ten years old I'm sure there are things I could upgrade. Also I want to make this my fitness bike, I got a lot of work to do so I just want to get it in the best shape possible. At my current fitness level I don't want to buy a new bike when I'm to out of shape to use it the way it's supposed to be.

Last edited by mikemartin; 10-23-12 at 01:38 PM.
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Old 10-23-12, 01:51 PM
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Originally Posted by mikemartin View Post
I love the bike and it is a joy to ride, I just want to know what I can do to maximize performance, on it. Also It's ten years old I'm sure there are things I could upgrade.
Sounds like a case of upgrade-itis. I get that occasionally too. Sometimes it's nice to put something different on your ride. Probably the only thing that would be noticeable would be to replace the tires, as others have mentioned. At your weight if you went with a 28mm tire I think you'd want 120psi in the back. I'm assuming you're on 32mm tires right now, if so and your tire allows it then 95psi is about right. Putting in higher pressure will decrease the rolling resistance, and your weight determines how much pressure to put in to allow a consistent amount of tire deflection/deformation.

Aerodynamics is another area where you can make some speed gains, and that is done by changing your posture on the bike. Your bike is designed to be in a more upright position which creates more drag than if you are leaning forward more. To change that you'd need a bike with a different geometry. However, like another poster mentioned, maintaining 20mph on a bike with that geometry is doing really well.

There is also the option of wearing a jetpack for better performance. This seems like the option with the most performance gains, but they sure look heavy.
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Old 10-23-12, 02:09 PM
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I'm using bontrager select invert b's 700c x 35. I didn't put much thought into the tires I just asked my LBS for new tires and that's what they gave me. I didn't realize it was so significant (newbie). I currently have about 1000 miles on them, and they seem to perform well.
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Old 10-23-12, 02:32 PM
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I was in your shoes once. Had a decent hybrid, and wanted it to go faster. Here is my 2 cents;

First and most important, get that wheel trued. Im a big guy also, and a neglected wheel will destroy itself quickly. Don't waste money on expensive upgrades. Invest in good tires and replace components only when needed. Don't waste your money on disc brakes. I have them and they are great, but it's an expensive upgrade and not necessary. Get some slick tires. Tread is worthless. Don't go too skinny as you loose your ability to deal with road bumps. I went down to 23 and regretted it. I've settled in happily at 32, but 28 is as narrow as I would go. Just my opinion.

The engine (you) is what will make the bike go faster, so keep working on that. It sounds like you are getting good speed out of it, but there is certainly an upper limit you can reach on any bike. 15-20 mph? Avg? That's pretty fast man! Ask around here and you will find that is above average. Ride for a while a determine if that's really not fast enough for you. (That's pretty fast). You may find out what I did. I had a false perception that I was going slow, due to all of the whizing cars going by. But then I notice other cyclists that I was either overtaking, or keeping pace with. Then one day, at my normal cadence with all my gear, I blew past a Armstong wannabe on his $5000 carbon beauty, while he was dripping with sweat. I realized, my bike was just as fast as anything else I could pedal. What is a 2 mph difference really matter?

If you are in great shape and good tires don't make you feel any better, then you probably want a different bike. Maybe a road bike. All the money you saved by not doing silly upgrades will help fund this.
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Old 10-23-12, 02:38 PM
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As mentioned, truing the wheel is the first step. If you don't, you may break spokes or the wheel may even "taco" (fold like a taco shell) and be ruined and you could get injured.

People are recommending skinny tires with high pressure, but remember this can add harshness to your ride. You don't need a faster bike to get fit, in fact that is a bit of an irony. You need to make yourself faster, not the bike.

Last edited by cooker; 10-23-12 at 04:33 PM.
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Old 10-23-12, 03:39 PM
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Ride it for a while after you get the wheel trued and you'll have a better idea of which direction to go. You'll probably have bought a bunch of new stuff that may solve the urge to buy more stuff by then too.
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Old 10-23-12, 05:14 PM
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mikemartin
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@nash great post, thanks man.
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