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What does it mean when A bike manufacturer uses "Alloy approved" parts?

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What does it mean when A bike manufacturer uses "Alloy approved" parts?

Old 10-27-12, 08:16 PM
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mikemartin
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What does it mean when A bike manufacturer uses "Alloy approved" parts?

I'm looking around at road bikes. A few manufacturers, Especially Trek, say their bikes have "Bontrager approved" alloys. I'm also looking at a 2012 Fuji Roubaix 3.0 and they say they have Fuji CGC alloys. Why don't they have a model names? It's kind of annoying, everytime I google Fuji CGC, all kinds of nonsense comes up, like bike advertisments. I want to look at the rims!! lol

I'm assuming it means that Bontrager certified a third party rim company?

And are Fuji CGC's actually Fuji rims or are they another third party "approved" rim?

What brands are typical used for "approved" rims?

One more noob question sorry guys, How does quality compare for an entry level Bontrager rim to a Bontrager "approved" rim?
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Old 10-27-12, 10:46 PM
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unterhausen
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I have had bad luck with the only Bontrager rim I ever used. This was a lightweight rim though, I wouldn't think it was a general problem

My understanding is a lot of those rebranded rims are made by Alex, but I have no idea in these specific instances. Lets just say if they were made by a better rim company they would have the brand on them
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Old 10-27-12, 10:50 PM
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It just sounds like marketingspeak. I agree with Unterhausen. If they were really good rims they'd have the name on them.
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Old 10-28-12, 06:18 AM
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It means that the Board of the aforementioned Alloys sat, held a quorum, and approved said "parts."
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Old 10-28-12, 08:34 AM
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Most of the house brand parts from the big manufactures are of pretty similar quality, at least on lower levels usually directly related to the cost of the bike.
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Old 10-28-12, 08:49 AM
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It's all marketing BS.

Most bikes are made of 6061 aluminum alloy. 6061 is 6061 is 6061 no matter whose name is on it or who "approved it". It's all the same stuff.

More expensive frames will sometimes be made of 7005 aluminum alloy. 7005 is 7005 is 7005 no matter whose name is on it or who "approved" it. It's all the same stuff.

Components like handlebars are made often made of 7075 aluminum alloy. Etc. …

The point is, if I go out and my some 6061 and make a bike frame out of it and call it "TSL alloy" or "TSL approved", that doesn't make it any different than if the OP goes out, buys some 6061, welds it together into a bike frame and calls it "MikeMartin alloy" or "MikeMartin approved" It's all the same stuff.

There certainly are differences in the way the tubes are formed, shaped, butted, and heat-treated. Further, the way tubes are chosen and the shapes they're welded into are also different and often significant. But the alloy remains the same.

Metallurgy For Bicyclists
Bicycle Frame Aluminum Alloys
Common Aluminum Alloys and Their Applications
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Old 10-28-12, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by tsl View Post
It's all marketing BS.
I agree.

Originally Posted by mikemartin View Post
I'm looking around at road bikes.
When it comes to deciding on a road bike, I know that the marketing can be confusing. Good luck on your search.
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Old 10-28-12, 09:07 PM
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mikemartin
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Thanks for the info guys.

When it comes to deciding on a road bike, I know that the marketing can be confusing. Good luck on your search.


Yes it is, there is a lot of marketing and misleading information. That's why I'm asking you guys before I buy anything lol
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