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Belt drive, disc brakes, drop bars -- does it exist?

Old 11-28-13, 09:15 AM
  #1  
jagged
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Belt drive, disc brakes, drop bars -- does it exist?

In my ten-year long quest for the perfect commuter bike, I've decided that I need to get a touring or cyclocross bike with: a belt drive; disc brakes; drop bar; rear rack; and full fenders. Internally routed cables would also be nice. However, as far as I've been able to Google, no one makes such a thing. Any suggestions?

Touring or cyclocross because I don't want the rolling resistance of a hybrid or MTB (that was the problem with bike #1 ) but I do want a bit more width than a racing bike (bike #2 ) to have a smoother ride.

Drop bars because my commute has a number of hills, and flat bars (as bikes #1 & #3 had) force an upright posture that makes climbing more of a pain.

Fenders because I ride in rain, and not having fenders messes up your clothes (as I discovered on bike #1 and #2 ). Rear rack because by the time I had bought bike #4 , I had landed a new job, and needed to carry a suit to work every day.

Disc brakes because I ride every day, and because I stop at every stop sign and red light, so changing brake pads every two months (as bike #4 required) gets old fast.

Belt drive because my switch to disc brakes did indeed cut down on my maintenance chores, but now I'm wearing out my drivetrain on bike #5 every four months. (I'm also wearing out cables every year or so, so internal routing might be nice to fix that problem).

I greatly appreciate any assistance the forum can provide. For now, let's not worry about budget.
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Old 11-28-13, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by jagged View Post
In my ten-year long quest for the perfect commuter bike.. Any suggestions?

I greatly appreciate any assistance the forum can provide. For now, let's not worry about budget.
I'd suggest also not worrying about buying the "perfect" bike but rather try to enjoy the best bike that you can find that meets most/all of your bicycling needs. You may find the "perfect" bike unobtainable at any price unless you want to build it yourself; and then you may not find it "perfect" after all.
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Old 11-28-13, 09:59 AM
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There are many such bikes-- here's one: https://www.en.tout-terrain.de/bicycles/x-over/ -- but they're expensive, which is perhaps why they seem hard to find.

Actually the X-Over doesn't have internal routing, but it is fully housed, which offers the same protection.

Finally, I'd just note for the record that flat bars do not force upright posture as you claim. Setting the bike with the bar up high does that, and it's not hard to locate a flat bar, or any handlebar, down low if you so desire.
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Old 11-28-13, 10:01 AM
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Here's another, at a more affordable price point, though you will sacrifice full cable housing: https://civiacycles.com/bikes/kingfield/
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Old 11-28-13, 11:17 AM
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There was a norco like that a few years ago (flatbars though). Discs, 8 spd igh, belt drive (I think the shifter for the IGH the belt needs is going to be your leading conflict w/ dropbars). Not too pricy, ~$1200 at the time, w/ fenders and rack if I remember right. Belt drive looks awesome. No grease!
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Old 11-28-13, 11:27 AM
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rather than brand touts,("I got a 'X' and it's Great") look at the bike frames and how they are different.

YOU buy all the parts, assemble them , and then it will Exist.

Once you Opt for an Internal gear hub,* that the Gates belt drive system makes a cog wheel to fit,

And a frame that Splits open to let the belt pass through the rear triangle,

And some method of achieving tension to keep the belt from jumping teeth,

You are good to Go. frame builder's factories are mentioned ..


In most cases your US LBS has to add the racks and mudguards, point of sale accessories,
are discounted when bought with the bike.



European Bike sellers have different distributors. Even if brand name is shared.





an Elevated Right chainstay and a swing arm style rear fork are also ways to use a looped belt.

Most people like normal looking frames.

Drop bar part adds complications , the shifters for Rohloff are grip shifters, just for straight bars

British Import [Versa] is required to get the only Alfine compatible Brifter,
it is not made by Shimano.

Then you have only Alfine 8 or 11 speed choice.


Happy shopping .. all the parts exist, just have to pay someone to put it all together,
sometimes they paint a name on the part they make, the frame.

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-30-13 at 10:55 AM.
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Old 11-28-13, 11:40 AM
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Originally Posted by jagged View Post
Touring or cyclocross because I don't want the rolling resistance of a hybrid or MTB
Could you explain???


Along the lines of your OP, this is one of the nicest set-ups that I've seen. I love it.
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Old 11-28-13, 12:11 PM
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Co-Motion makes a bike that fits all of your requirements.
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Old 11-28-13, 12:16 PM
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An IGH chain will last ages, so there's not a huge advantage with a belt drive. There's a rather substantial cost penalty for belt drive, though, and some complication mechanically.

There are any number of drop bar, disk brake bikes, suitable for mounting an IGH, and which take reasonably wide to wide tires. (well, a dozen models, maybe, but enough to find one you like.) Fit a chain case, and you'll have most of what you want from a belt.

I ride a Singular peregrine, with drops, an Alfine 8, Versa shifter, BB7s, fenders, generator hub and lights, rack. Full cable housings. Other than belt drive, it's got everyting you list. There are other bikes that do, too.
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Old 11-28-13, 12:48 PM
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Ask, and ye shall receive; Behold the Specialized AWOL. https://www.bikerumor.com/2013/07/17/...e-disc-for-cx/

You'd have to build up the frameset to go belt drive but the frame is ready.

Mine is on the way.
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Old 11-28-13, 03:12 PM
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Its a derailleur bike frame, not suitable, .. chain tensioner for an IGH is required. belt Drive Not.
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Old 11-28-13, 03:43 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post

Finally, I'd just note for the record that flat bars do not force upright posture as you claim. Setting the bike with the bar up high does that, and it's not hard to locate a flat bar, or any handlebar, down low if you so desire.
But slamming the stem with flat bars tend to place more weight on you hands. The lack of hand positions makes this more of a challenge.
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Old 11-28-13, 03:46 PM
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OP:
Take a look a the Surly Straggler as a frameset, & build to your liking.
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Old 11-28-13, 04:08 PM
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I'd love to have an IGH, belt drive, and Avid BB7 disc brakes. Such a steed would be virtually maintenance free. From my research, there are not many frames designed around the belt drive in mind. It seems that the belt drive also requires an iPhone app to properly tension...I hope that can be fixed one day so that the iPhone isn't required.
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Old 11-28-13, 05:44 PM
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Originally Posted by fietsbob View Post
Its a derailleur bike frame, not suitable, .. chain tensioner for an IGH is required. belt Drive Not.
The first paragraph of the linked article:

Jumping into the world of Adventure bikes, Specialized is testing the waters with the new AWOL. Built as a drop bar adventure bike, AWOL has clearance for 29×2.2, though it ships with 42c. The frame itself is a rugged steel number with the Comp model featuring a higher end Reynolds 725/520 Cr-Mo tubing with slider dropouts and split stays for single speed or belt drive use. Like other bikes in the genre, there are many faces to the AWOL from road, to dirt, and everything in between.
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Old 11-28-13, 06:22 PM
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Joe Bike in Portland has three models made by Spot, plus the Tout Terrain and a Raleigh: https://www.joe-bike.com/bikes/commuter-bikes/. They all have IGH, disk brakes, and belt drives.
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Old 11-28-13, 06:24 PM
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Originally Posted by Ghost Ryder View Post
OP:
Take a look a the Surly Straggler as a frameset, & build to your liking.
Does it have split stays to accommodate a belt drive? I hadn't seen that. Hope so!
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Old 11-28-13, 06:49 PM
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https://surlybikes.com/bikes/straggler
Originally Posted by Giant Doofus View Post
Does it have split stays to accommodate a belt drive? I hadn't seen that. Hope so!
Not sure about that, but it does almost everything in the OP
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Old 11-28-13, 08:35 PM
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Originally Posted by Ghost Ryder View Post
But slamming the stem with flat bars tend to place more weight on you hands. The lack of hand positions makes this more of a challenge.
I don't think I understand your reasoning here; are you suggesting that riding in the drops is, per force, more comfortable than the same amount of drop with a flat bar? I don't agree.

Even if it were true, it clearly has no bearing on the earlier false statement that flat bars put one in a more upright position. That's obviously a ridiculous statement, isn't it?
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Old 11-28-13, 09:03 PM
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Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
I don't think I understand your reasoning here; are you suggesting that riding in the drops is, per force, more comfortable than the same amount of drop with a flat bar? I don't agree.

Even if it were true, it clearly has no bearing on the earlier false statement that flat bars put one in a more upright position. That's obviously a ridiculous statement, isn't it?
Not hear to have a spitting contest with you, even though I know how much you like them here @ BF.
I'm just explaining from experience.
Not sure why both my Stumpy, & my 29er make my hands numb even though they have front suspension, yet none of my dropbar bikes do...
I use them same gloves, have proper fits, don't use the death grip while riding... I even sit more upright on these bikes.
Since your the expert would you care to explain why my experience is so far from being true?

I thought it might be I my head so I tried flat/risers on my fixed gear (rigid) same result.(slammed stem)
Please tell me why my hands go numb?

Notice, I'm not disagreeing with you, only asking for an answer.

Edit:
And yes I do put many more kms/miles on my dropbars than any of my flat/risers.

Last edited by Ghost Ryder; 11-28-13 at 09:08 PM.
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Old 11-29-13, 12:20 AM
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AWOL. gets you Brig time..

Didnt see a chain tensioner , or a Belt , tensioner . which needs to be Tighter than Chains..

there an EBB/? vertical dropout on the back , unlike the Orange one..

I like trekking bars now.. but I'm 66.. a bit past my prime.


I agree, a good IGH and a wider full bushing chain will be very much longer wearing
than a bushingless 8 speed derailleur chain..

Last edited by fietsbob; 11-29-13 at 12:46 AM.
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Old 11-29-13, 12:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Ghost Ryder View Post
Not hear to have a spitting contest with you, even though I know how much you like them here @ BF.
I'm just explaining from experience.
Not sure why both my Stumpy, & my 29er make my hands numb even though they have front suspension, yet none of my dropbar bikes do...
I use them same gloves, have proper fits, don't use the death grip while riding... I even sit more upright on these bikes.
Since your the expert would you care to explain why my experience is so far from being true?

I thought it might be I my head so I tried flat/risers on my fixed gear (rigid) same result.(slammed stem)
Please tell me why my hands go numb?

Notice, I'm not disagreeing with you, only asking for an answer.

Edit:
And yes I do put many more kms/miles on my dropbars than any of my flat/risers.
Your particular problems are not, and have not been, at issue, nor have they been discussed.

What is at issue: 1) Flat bars do not force the rider into an upright position. 2) I don't agree that, of necessity, a low flat bar puts more weight on the hands than an equally low drop bar.

Oh, and no need to carry on with the phony humility schtick; I didn't question with your comments because they're yours, I did because I think they're confusing and misleading.
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Old 11-29-13, 02:31 AM
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Originally Posted by Ghost Ryder View Post
But slamming the stem with flat bars tend to place more weight on you hands. The lack of hand positions makes this more of a challenge.
Re-read this...


Originally Posted by chaadster View Post
Your particular problems are not, and have not been, at issue, nor have they been discussed.

What is at issue: 1) Flat bars do not force the rider into an upright position. 2) I don't agree that, of necessity, a low flat bar puts more weight on the hands than an equally low drop bar.

Oh, and no need to carry on with the phony humility schtick; I didn't question with your comments because they're yours, I did because I think they're confusing and misleading.
If you're trying to get aero on flats, you shift you weight forward on the palms of your hands, more importantly your ulnar nerve.
This is what causes numbness in the hands.
I don't think its possible to get aero on flats IMO.


The OP asked for a bike with dropbars, you brought up flats.
He also asked for a CX/tourer/ road style/type bike.
Most of these frame styles are more aggressive than a MTB, or hybrid, but not as much as a road frame.
I used my experience as an example since I have ridden all these type frames.

Slight change in hand position can alter the way your weight is distributed through your hand.
Same goes for exercising. Slight change in position will work different muscle groups even though your doing the same exercise.
ie:
Leg press/squat: toes in, toes out

Riser/flat bars do tend to raise your posture, yes the angle, & reach of the stem will have an effect too.
On a riser bar, the bar ends "rise", hence the name.
Dropbars, "drop" the rider into an aero position.
Most flat bars have some rise too, unless you use them backwards which would put your posture @ a slight drop.

Risers also have your hands usually wider than shoulder length apart, this is to steer, have more control in tight/technical sections on a mountain. Just this alone changes the way you weight is transfer to your hand.
Think conventional pushup, pull up.

Dropbars are either shoulder length or narrower.
We lean into turns, no real need to steer very often.
Think narrow knuckle pushup, pull up.



True flats/fixie style bars are straight/flat & short.
I wouldn't recommend these on anything other than fixie.

Last edited by Ghost Ryder; 11-29-13 at 02:35 AM.
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Old 11-29-13, 03:38 AM
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Old 11-29-13, 07:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Ghost Ryder View Post
Re-read this...

If you're trying to get aero on flats, you shift you weight forward on the palms of your hands, more importantly your ulnar nerve.
This is what causes numbness in the hands.
I don't think its possible to get aero on flats IMO.


The OP asked for a bike with dropbars, you brought up flats.
He also asked for a CX/tourer/ road style/type bike.
Most of these frame styles are more aggressive than a MTB, or hybrid, but not as much as a road frame.
I used my experience as an example since I have ridden all these type frames.

Slight change in hand position can alter the way your weight is distributed through your hand.
Same goes for exercising. Slight change in position will work different muscle groups even though your doing the same exercise.
ie:
Leg press/squat: toes in, toes out

Riser/flat bars do tend to raise your posture, yes the angle, & reach of the stem will have an effect too.
On a riser bar, the bar ends "rise", hence the name.
Dropbars, "drop" the rider into an aero position.
Most flat bars have some rise too, unless you use them backwards which would put your posture @ a slight drop.

Risers also have your hands usually wider than shoulder length apart, this is to steer, have more control in tight/technical sections on a mountain. Just this alone changes the way you weight is transfer to your hand.
Think conventional pushup, pull up.

Dropbars are either shoulder length or narrower.
We lean into turns, no real need to steer very often.
Think narrow knuckle pushup, pull up.

True flats/fixie style bars are straight/flat & short.
I wouldn't recommend these on anything other than fixie.
Ignoring why I took issue with your statement and confounding the discussion with more silly statements like "Most flat bars have some rise too, unless you use them backwards..." makes it clear your mind has gone 'missing in action' here. Perhaps you're still in a Thanksgiving food coma?
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