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The psychology and economics of commuting on a bike

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The psychology and economics of commuting on a bike

Old 10-04-14, 09:57 AM
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Bikeforumuser0019
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The psychology and economics of commuting on a bike

Hello everyone.

I was here months ago asking for advice about buying a used bike to begin commuting with.

I haven't yet gotten a bike. Since then I've gotten a new full time job and will have more money to buy.... something. Since then I've also been working at REI and have had an opportunity to look closely at a lot of specialized bicycle equipment I previously knew nothing about.

Here's my question. I appreciate the fact that some people have very technical requirements for the gear they use in various outdoor activities. If I had a couple thousand dollars, I think I'd like to have some padded bicycle shorts and reflective clothing and various other parts and upgrades that make an average bike a really wonderful machine.

But my primary motivation is to save money by driving my car less, spare the car of un-needed wear and tear (not to rid myself of it completely) and for exercise. I'm not trying to impress anybody. My priorities are roughly this: 1) frugal 2) comfortable/ergonomic 3) practical. The practical part is very important, because if I get something that is not easy to dismantle, easy to transport, easy to put on a commuter train, easy to maintain and repair, I know I won't follow through over the long run.

In other words, I am not looking for a new hobby to dispense with the spare thousands of dollars I have lying around. But that doesn't mean I have no standards or expectations of what I ultimately buy. I shouldn't have to have expensive clothes or equipment to run, bike, hike, fish, or any of these things. It's okay if other people want those things, but it is not what is right for me. "Back in the day" these used to be the simple pleasures in life. And I like my life to be simple rather than complex. I value simplicity, and will often pay more for things if they offer simplicity. I'd love to have a great bike but I don't want unnecessary complexity if that is possible. I hope I'm explaining myself well.

I'd appreciate your thoughts, advice, anecdotes, stories, or other insights into humanity regarding this topic. Also, if you know of a bicycle that would be "the perfect fit" for the kind of relationship I want to have with my bike, I welcome suggestions. My new workplace is very bicycle friendly and rather car un-friendly. I'll start in a few weeks.

Best Regards,
JAE

Last edited by Bikeforumuser0019; 10-04-14 at 10:06 AM. Reason: added one additional thought
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Old 10-04-14, 10:09 AM
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Commuting is as easy as pie and you're working at a place that sells pretty nice bikes. I'd be tempted to pick up an rei hybrid and fix it up for commuting. You don't need fancy clothes, just fenders, a light, and some sort of system for carrying your gear.
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Old 10-04-14, 10:27 AM
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Where did you snag this bicycle friendly job at? I am about to use a 60$ rigid MTB from the '90s as my commuter. It will handle a beat up well and I don't really care if it gets stolen seeing how I only invested a few dollars.
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Old 10-04-14, 10:27 AM
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I also value simplicity...If you are interested in ultimate simplicity and minimal maintenance then you need a singlespeed or fixed gear bike , preferably with a stealthy dark colour frame so it doesn't attract too much attention....I am not impressed with how the majority of modern bicycles look, cycling has become a fashion show, it seems that cosmetic appearance has become No.1 priority for a lot of people...You don't need any fancy special cycling clothing and kit or an expensive racing bike with carbon components and a 10 speed cassette.
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Old 10-04-14, 10:32 AM
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
I've also been working at REI and have had an opportunity to look closely at a lot of specialized bicycle equipment I previously knew nothing about.
And that's why I don't shop at REI
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Old 10-04-14, 10:57 AM
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You should be able to get anything you need at REI, and if you get an employee discount you'll have less to worry about financially.
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Old 10-04-14, 11:20 AM
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Ensure that you and the bike fit each other properly and everything else will be a trial and error process.
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Old 10-04-14, 11:30 AM
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I went for simplicity a few times before i realize it was a dream

Bought a few second hand 50$ bikes like this



After a week i realized simplicity left when i bought them
To sum up:
Brakes that doesn't brake when it rains
Brakes that get stuck
Brake cable that fail
Brake pads that i have to change often
Pedals that make a squiky noise
Chain that jumps all the time
Gears that don't switch
Wheels that rust during (canadian) winter
All the dust, mud that ends up on my back
No place to put a ulock or carry anything
Frame slightly too small or too big that don't fit properly
and the last but not least
a flat every week literally (this is the worst on the spirit since you always wonder if you won't get a flat today)

And this is nothing compared to my walmart bicycle that disintegrated by itself in a week (you ride and suddenly one part falls down then another...)
I remember having a shifter in my hand (not on the bike) while riding.
Good old days

Problems that you have to take care it's suddenly not so simple.

All those hassle are now thing of the past with my current bike but i had to increase complexity to get simplicity . [I had to build something to prevent the chain from jumping, to add extra protection inside the tires etc... which increase complexity]
The only thing i have to do now is grease or change my chain once a year, i had to adjust the shifters once in the last 4 years, no flat for the last what 3 years and counting (since i took care of the tire problem)

Whatever your choice you have to take care of those hassle. Cheaper is not always the best option.

Last edited by erig007; 10-04-14 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 10-04-14, 11:49 AM
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I live in the flats so I commute on a SS/FG, fairly basic bike. I don't wear padded/cycling specific clothes on my 8 mile one way commute, however I did at first to toughen up. I ride 50 to 100 miles most weekends with all the roadie gear on, I'm assuming this helps keep my sit bones in shape for commuting.

Had I never experienced Conti GP 4000s tires I would have remained happy with my cheap Kenda commuting tires. Now the Kenda's feel terrible, they also seriously lack grip in the rain. I could have just slowed down in the rain but instead I'm now running a $90 set of Conti's on my commuter as well. In defense of the Conti's I get over 5K out of a set and less than half that out of cheap tires. Not sure if it balances out but it's at least reasonably close unless you cut a new Conti side wall. I've never cut a side wall but the Internet assures me I will.

Seems like it would be tough staying bike frugal while working at REI and hanging out on BF. Stay strong!
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Old 10-04-14, 01:04 PM
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I think the ability to commute cheaply by bike is highly dependent on how long your commute is, how reliable getting to work needs to be, and where you live. When I first started commuting by bike, I lived 1.25 miles away and had little money. I bought a $150, 10 year old MTB from an LBS and spent an additional $100-150 on lights, lock, pannier, helmet, etc... There were no hills, the way was pretty well lit, and I lived in SoCal, so dry all year round and (where I was) no hills. For two years, I didn't upgrade anything on my bike, did zero maintenance, and it kept on running. But I was barely challenging the bike.

Since then, I've moved to the northwest, where I have to deal with rain, hills, and an 8 mile commute. I also have a lot more money, and I've basically upgraded my whole bike (only the frame, headset, handlebar, seat post, rear wheel and derailleur remain original). But it runs much more reliably and smoothly now, which I need given the much longer commute and the more challenging conditions.

So, basically, for a short, simple commute in good weather, any old bike will do. The upgrades are needed for longer, messier commutes.
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Old 10-04-14, 01:13 PM
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Just get a bike and start riding it. Simple as that.

Your already making it more complicated than it needs to be.
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Old 10-04-14, 01:23 PM
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turky lurkey has it right.

Step 1: buy a bike that's the right size. Online, used, bike shop, or big store
Step 2: get a screwdriver, wrenches and some grease and get everything working and adjusted.
Step 3: ride it to work
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Old 10-04-14, 01:26 PM
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My winter bike is a SS rigid steel MTB. I bought it for $60 as well and converted it to SS after the first winter. Has got to be the cheapest form of transportation other than walking. Little to no maintenance whatsoever.

Originally Posted by AbsurdChalk View Post
Where did you snag this bicycle friendly job at? I am about to use a 60$ rigid MTB from the '90s as my commuter. It will handle a beat up well and I don't really care if it gets stolen seeing how I only invested a few dollars.
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Old 10-04-14, 01:42 PM
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Originally Posted by erig007 View Post
I went for simplicity a few times before i realize it was a dream
Yeah... there is nothing so expensive as a cheap bike!
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Old 10-04-14, 02:09 PM
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I'm a fan of cheap and simple. I found well respected steel mountain bikes on craigslist, like Specialized Rockhopper or Hardrock, and sweetly, my Miyata Ridgerunner. These cost around $50 to $70 each, and make great commuters. I added fenders, a rear rack, used panniers off eBay, a bell, and a super blinky on the back. Total cost could be about $100, and you can keep the rack, fenders and saddle bags should you ever upgrade. I found commuting to be super for my health, my mood and my wallet. Don't become a bike consumer. Stay cheap, use regular clothing and enjoy yourself. I do about 5,000 miles a year, and my only real cost is about $100 a year for tires.
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Old 10-04-14, 02:15 PM
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1. Buy a bike that's the right size and fits well. You could go with upright, that's a little easier to get fit on. Or entry level road, like a Specialized Sectuer. There are definitely cheaper options out there as well. Just don't get something that isn't the right size.
2. Did I mention get it fit right? Lol, #1 mistake I saw in college was people riding with the seat to low. I don't mean an overly complex $250 fit with video, just something that puts your seat and handlebars in the right position.
3. Make sure your bike has flat resistant tires. Most bikes comes with them now, but I wouldn't ride without them for anything. You probably also need tools to fix a flat on the road...it somewhat depends on your route.
4. Lights. If you're riding at or around dark, you need a front light and a rear blinking light. I use 2 rear lights because I've had one go out, and you don't know because it's behind you so you're riding with no lights. People have recently been talking about how cars seem to see them better having their front light blinking in daylight as well.
5. If you want to ride in inclement weather, that adds a lot more complexity.
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Old 10-04-14, 02:37 PM
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If you come to a internet forum a lot of people are really into, and adamant about bicycle riding. Thats all good, but sometimes things get a little overcomplicated.
I have a formula that worked for me for years/decades. A cheapo Japanese steel bike from Craigslist, which might take a little time to find, some flat resistant tires and some lights and mirrors. All this can be done for 300.00. I've done it a few times.
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Old 10-04-14, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by erig007 View Post
I went for simplicity a few times before i realize it was a dream

Bought a few second hand 50$ bikes like this



After a week i realized simplicity left when i bought them
To sum up:
Brakes that doesn't brake when it rains
Brakes that get stuck
Brake cable that fail
Brake pads that i have to change often
Pedals that make a squiky noise
Chain that jumps all the time
Gears that don't switch
Wheels that rust during (canadian) winter
All the dust, mud that ends up on my back
No place to put a ulock or carry anything
Frame slightly too small or too big that don't fit properly
and the last but not least
a flat every week literally (this is the worst on the spirit since you always wonder if you won't get a flat today)

And this is nothing compared to my walmart bicycle that disintegrated by itself in a week (you ride and suddenly one part falls down then another...)
I remember having a shifter in my hand (not on the bike) while riding.
Good old days

Problems that you have to take care it's suddenly not so simple.

All those hassle are now thing of the past with my current bike but i had to increase complexity to get simplicity . [I had to build something to prevent the chain from jumping, to add extra protection inside the tires etc... which increase complexity]
The only thing i have to do now is grease or change my chain once a year, i had to adjust the shifters once in the last 4 years, no flat for the last what 3 years and counting (since i took care of the tire problem)

Whatever your choice you have to take care of those hassle. Cheaper is not always the best option.
It looks like you just had bad luck...I know a guy at my work who bought two vintage road bikes at a garage sale for $100 each. To be honest, I have never seen a vintage bikes in such perfect condition as his. They are spotless, everything works perfectly, all the components are original and in new condition, looks like they haven't been used much and spent most of their time in storage.
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Old 10-04-14, 04:39 PM
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Originally Posted by College3.0 View Post
If I had a couple thousand dollars, I think I'd like to have some padded bicycle shorts and reflective clothing and various other parts and upgrades that make an average bike a really wonderful machine.
Then you must be using top shelf parts and having all the work done by the shop.

Any activity can get expensive if you just throw a credit card at it. Check this link to see if there are any co-ops in your area. They'll show you how you can put together a nice rig on the cheap.
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Old 10-04-14, 04:57 PM
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Buy the Novara Flyby ($600 less your discount), a helmet, and a U lock, and start riding. I suggested that folding model because it sounds like you will be taking the bike on the train. If you will not be taking the bike on trains/buses and have a long commute, then get the Zealo for ($700 less your discount). Have the bike shop guys figure out what size bike you need.

A year from now, you'll have a good sense of what you need/want and can buy another bike then.
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Old 10-04-14, 05:21 PM
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Lots of good advice here already. If you go with a used bike, I'd suggest getting something that's new enough that you don't have to scour the depths of hell to find replacements in 10 or 20 years. If possible, those parts should be serviceable with a minimum number of (expensive) specialized tools.

If you'll own just one bike, get one that motivates you ride often, even under non-ideal conditions. For this reason, pure practicality can't be the only consideration. It has to be interesting and fun as well. Personally, a bike that doesn't require special shoes, clothing, and weather, just to go down the block, is what I prefer.

Aside from choosing a bike, what you do with it matters. I suggest making a personal commitment to become self sufficient in the maintenance department. If you work at REI, I suggest spending a few minutes after each shift in the repair shop, just watching them do basic things like tune-ups and tire repairs.
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Old 10-04-14, 05:30 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl View Post
A year from now, you'll have a good sense of what you need/want and can buy another bike then.
Meh... by the time you figure out what you need, you'll figure you need ten more bikes.

(but seriously, very true and good advice... except for buying anything from REI, which is overpriced even with an employee discount, unless you grab something on clearance).
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Old 10-04-14, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild View Post
It looks like you just had bad luck...I know a guy at my work who bought two vintage road bikes at a garage sale for $100 each. To be honest, I have never seen a vintage bikes in such perfect condition as his. They are spotless, everything works perfectly, all the components are original and in new condition, looks like they haven't been used much and spent most of their time in storage.
Damn i should stop buying lottery tickets or maybe your guy should.
Perhaps if i increase my price limit to 100$, 50$ is probably too cheap.

Last edited by erig007; 10-04-14 at 05:43 PM.
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Old 10-04-14, 05:51 PM
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Originally Posted by jyl View Post
A year from now, you'll have a good sense of what you need/want and can buy another bike then.
+1. The bike I bought with no adult cycling experience and the bikes I want now that I've got several thousand miles in this year do not overlap at all.
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Old 10-04-14, 06:19 PM
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It's pretty simple. In the morning, go for a ride that ends at work. In the evening, go for a ride that ends at home.

Everything else is detail.
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