Commuting Bicycle commuting is easier than you think, before you know it, you'll be hooked. Learn the tips, hints, equipment, safety requirements for safely riding your bike to work.

Nearly hit them

Old 11-05-14, 10:28 AM
  #26  
unterhausen
Randomhead
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Happy Valley, Pennsylvania
Posts: 18,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Liked 33 Times in 30 Posts
Moderators note: it seems that this thread is getting a little heated. Nothing here has reached that point, but please recall the rules against direct insults and other harassing posts. Thanks
unterhausen is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 10:34 AM
  #27  
jyl
Senior Member
 
jyl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Portland OR
Posts: 7,515

Bikes: 61 Bianchi Specialissima 71 Peugeot G50 7? P'geot PX10 74 Raleigh GranSport 75 P'geot UO8 78? Raleigh Team Pro 82 P'geot PSV 86 P'geot PX 91 Bridgestone MB0 92 B'stone XO1 97 Rans VRex 92 Cannondale R1000 94 B'stone MB5 97 Vitus 997

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 337 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Ninja cyclists get no sympathy from me. When I'm driving at night in a dark area and especially when it is raining, I find them almost impossible to see. When riding at night, I am lit up with multiple taillights, bright headlight(s), and reflective strips on the clothing, helmet and backpack. I am very visible. A decent tailight/front blinking light combination only costs about $50.
jyl is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 10:50 AM
  #28  
Tundra_Man 
The Fat Guy In The Back
 
Tundra_Man's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Posts: 2,144

Bikes: '81 Panasonic Sport, '02 Giant Boulder SE, '08 Felt S32, '10 Diamondback Insight RS, '10 Windsor Clockwork, '15 Kestrel Evoke 3.0

Mentioned: 78 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 262 Post(s)
Liked 22 Times in 11 Posts
Last week I rode to an event at my son's school in the dark. After I arrived a woman came up to me and said, "I saw you riding your bike on the way here. That's great! I'm also glad you had lights because it made you easier to see."

Anecdotal evidence, no doubt. But it worked that time.
__________________
Visit me at the Tundra Man Workshop
Tundra_Man is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 10:56 AM
  #29  
corrado33
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: Bozeman
Posts: 4,112

Bikes: 199? Landshark Roadshark, 198? Mondonico Diamond, 1987 Panasonic DX-5000, 1987 Bianchi Limited, Univega... Chrome..., 1989 Schwinn Woodlands, Motobecane USA Record, Raleigh Tokul 2

Mentioned: 24 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1125 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by unterhausen View Post
Moderators note: it seems that this thread is getting a little heated. Nothing here has reached that point, but please recall the rules against direct insults and other harassing posts. Thanks
No doubt you're referring to my post. I apologize. I'll leave this to everyone else to discuss.
corrado33 is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 10:59 AM
  #30  
tarwheel 
Senior Member
 
tarwheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,902

Bikes: Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL, Specialized Sequoia

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
My commute is 30+ miles round-trip, and I ride year-round. Thus, I am riding in the dark for significant amounts of time during the fall, winter and spring. I have observed and learned a few things doing that for the past 8 years.

- Lights make a huge difference, both in terms of seeing the road and being seen by drivers. I use a handlebar and helmet light. The helmet light, in particular, will bring drivers to a stop at side streets, driveways, parking lots, etc. It has happened so many times that there's no way I could keep count. You simply turn your head and look at the driver -- briefly is all it takes -- and they come to a halt. Trust me, it works. I have experienced this time and time again during my commute.
- Reflective gear and bright clothes make a huge difference in terms of being seen. I encounter joggers and walkers on the streets, in the dark, frequently during my commute. I can spot a runner wearing neon clothes at least 1/2 mile away. In contrast, I have come close to hitting a number of runners wearing ninja outfits, even with my very bright LED headlights. Reflective stripes on black clothing helps, but are not nearly as effective as neon colors.

I will concede one point. Sometimes nothing would make a difference, such as circumstances involving distracted drivers, drunk drivers, drivers texting or talking on cell phones, reckless drivers, red-light runners, etc. However, just because lights and bright clothing don't work in every circumstance does not mean that they don't help most of the time. Taking safety measures does not create a protective bubble around you, but they do increase your odds of avoiding accidents.
tarwheel is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 12:36 PM
  #31  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,181

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1569 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
....... I can't blame someone else for not seeing me. ........ I can't blame someone else for not knowing what I'm going to do.

In New York state the law requires ........ .
I concede that you are absolutely correct!!! If this thread is about LAWS and "assigning blame" in a legal sense.... then yes... you are correct. And... if that is the way that you are stuck with thinking.... then so be it. You win! But what do you win?!?!? Blame and safety aren't the same thing. And if you can NOT determine your safety... you can't improve it.
Dave Cutter is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 12:40 PM
  #32  
Siu Blue Wind
BACK2ME
 
Siu Blue Wind's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 12,944
Mentioned: 40 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1598 Post(s)
Liked 57 Times in 42 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
No doubt you're referring to my post. I apologize. I'll leave this to everyone else to discuss.

You are welcome to stay. A good healthy discussion and debate is always good. That note was to everyone in this thread.
__________________
Originally Posted by making View Post
Please dont outsmart the censor. That is a very expensive censor and every time one of you guys outsmart it it makes someone at the home office feel bad. We dont wanna do that. So dont cleverly disguise bad words.
Siu Blue Wind is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 12:49 PM
  #33  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,181

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1569 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
.......I have observed and learned a few things doing that for the past 8 years.

I will concede one point. Sometimes nothing would make a difference, such as circumstances involving distracted drivers, drunk drivers, drivers texting or talking on cell phones, reckless drivers, red-light runners, etc.
And you just described the vast majority of drivers likely to run you over. That is.... if you don't crash into the motorist because of your own distracted, drunken, or texting cycling habits.

Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
However, just because lights and bright clothing don't work in every circumstance does not mean that they don't help most of the time.....
I re-read you post a couple times.... how many joggers/runner have you hit? You know the ones that didn't wear bright and/or reflective clothing? The "lack of bright clothing" is never a cause of an accident. Although good visibility does increase cycling/driving comfort. I wear bright clothing myself. But a bright neon kit.... isn't a magic cloak. It may make you "feel" safer and there is nothing wrong with that. But it doesn't alter the inherent risk... sorry.
Dave Cutter is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 01:02 PM
  #34  
Caliper
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2014
Location: Michigan
Posts: 768

Bikes: Many

Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 250 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 9 Times in 6 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
College students LOVE to FLY down the hill on those bikes and cross the road without looking just because they're in a crosswalk and technically have the right of way.
I don't believe this is typically the case. Don't most states regard a bicycle to have the same right of way and responsibilities of a motor vehicle? Well, more like a moped, since we can't usually ride on interstate highways... You're either a pedestrian or you aren't and since law says bikes are not pedestrians, I don't think the crosswalk rights of way apply the same to a cyclist. Basically, I have a hard time seeing an honest cop assigning blame to a motorist after a cyclist blasts out from between two buildings at "15mph" (yeah, just like I always keep to the 10mph speed limit on the MUP )
Caliper is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 01:07 PM
  #35  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,181

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1569 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Most modern motorists have an attention span of 7 seconds or less. In recent years it has become common for motorists to operate with 4 seconds temporary memory.

So what does that mean? It means as someone drives home they aren't committing everything to memory. The events are placed only in a temporary working memory that last only seconds. That is why (if you drove last night)... you don't remember the 23rd car that passed by you... or the license plate number of the car you followed for 10 minutes. You never really ever knew... you saw those things and discarded them without forming a real memory.

This... is what causes most of the cyclist-motorist accidents. We appear to come from no where... NOT because of a lack of brightness. But because of an evolutionary "error" in our development. Bright clothing IS a good idea as are lights (I use them myself). But they won't fix the problem that puts cyclist in danger.
Dave Cutter is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 01:24 PM
  #36  
billyymc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,149
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 165 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
This... is what causes most of the cyclist-motorist accidents. We appear to come from no where... NOT because of a lack of brightness. But because of an evolutionary "error" in our development. Bright clothing IS a good idea as are lights (I use them myself). But they won't fix the problem that puts cyclist in danger.
Dave - I understand the point you're trying to make.

But lights and bright colored clothing do fix ONE problem. The problem of whether a person riding at night can be seen or not seen.

I have a black bike. If I ride at night wearing black clothing, without lights or reflectors, there I have seriously reduced my own visibility to other road users whether they be motorists, cyclists, or peds.

So wearing brighter clothing, putting decent quality lights on front and back, and having reflective surfaces on my bike or clothing or other gear fixes a problem. Without that fix I've almost guaranteed that others won't see me. With that fix I've given them the chance to see me.

I think what you're arguing is that even with all that, there is still a chance they won't see me. I would certainly agree with that, and I'm sure most others here would as well. Goes back to some drivers being inattentive, careless, selfish.

In my opinion, on the routes I typically ride, I believe my lighting and clothing choices give me about the same chance of being seen by a driver at night as they do during the day. So to your point - pretty much the same inherent risks of getting hit.

But without those lights, clothes, and reflectery stuff, I am nowhere NEAR as visible at night as I am during the day. That can't be overstated. I would never even consider riding the routes I ride without that stuff, because if I did I've made it nearly impossible for a driver to see me. And that would be my fault, not theirs.
billyymc is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 01:31 PM
  #37  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,181

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1569 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by corrado33 View Post
I politely asked you to post facts instead of simple websites that can easily lie about anything. You're argument tactics include bullying people by making them feel dumb for "not knowing" what "should be known."
I am sure you're a polite person. But please understand I can only read your posts.... I can't easily distinguish polite. I have no desire to make anyone feel bad in anyway. If I did that I am sorry. I don't understand why everyone posts some of the things they post. I don't understand how people relate symbolic behaviors to predictable outcomes.

People allow themselves to be concerned with blame and fault. Yet... I've never seen grief altered by such legal terms. I think it is more important that we all stay alive... instead of agreeing on the assignment of blame/guilt.

Bright cycling clothing and spandex are very much the rage and/or fashionable trend for cyclist right now.... however clothing fashion is only fashion. Although I think trends are turning to the Black, black, black color schemes. But don't expect the changing fashions to alter cycling safety. It's only fashion.

We can all be safer while cycling. Knowing and understanding of the variables helps... as does proper procedures. However... cycling has inherent risks. It might be a mistake to discard the risks in favor of symbolic gestures like good luck charms. I would never do anything to make any cyclist less safe. I can't proclaim you less safe by exposing the limits of bright clothing. I am on your side.
Dave Cutter is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 01:40 PM
  #38  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,181

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1569 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
Dave - I understand the point you're trying to make.

But lights and bright colored clothing do fix ONE problem. The problem of whether a person riding at night can be seen or not seen.
Of course. And those ninja-cyclist don't want to be seen. I don't know if they are drugging, stealing, or just being "cool".... they are trying to avoid being seen. And.... I don't think that particular crowd are dropping like flys ether.

Certainly drinking/drugging/ and being around others who are doing the same greatly increases cycling risks. However I am NOT convinced that wearing pricey bright colored and fashionable cycling jersey with reflective trim makes anyone measurably safer.
Dave Cutter is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 01:47 PM
  #39  
billyymc
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 1,149
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 165 Post(s)
Liked 8 Times in 7 Posts
Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
However I am NOT convinced that wearing pricey bright colored and fashionable cycling jersey with reflective trim makes anyone measurably safer.
As far as I know, nobody's measured it Dave.

It's your opinion, but why color it with the words "pricey" and "fashionable"? What do those have to do with brightness of clothing and use of lights?
billyymc is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 02:30 PM
  #40  
Dave Cutter
Senior Member
 
Dave Cutter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: D'uh... I am a Cutter
Posts: 6,181

Bikes: '17 Access Old Turnpike Gravel bike, '14 Trek 1.1, '13 Cannondale CAAD 10, '98 CAD 2, R300

Mentioned: 62 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1569 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Originally Posted by billyymc View Post
As far as I know, nobody's measured it Dave.

....... why color it with the words "pricey" and "fashionable"? What do those have to do with brightness of clothing and use of lights?
You want to select my words for me? There is a commitment made with the expenditure of money. No one wants to believe they are just throwing away money. An outlay for such items reinforces a belief in the items functional abilities. But throwing money at safety... isn't always the best way to improve safety.

Hey I've got some nice pricey stuff too. And I'd like to think I am no Fred (although.... I am what I am).
Dave Cutter is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 02:46 PM
  #41  
tarwheel 
Senior Member
 
tarwheel's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Raleigh, NC
Posts: 8,902

Bikes: Waterford RST-22, Bob Jackson World Tour, Ritchey Breakaway Cross, Soma Saga, De Bernardi SL, Specialized Sequoia

Mentioned: 36 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 194 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 1 Time in 1 Post
You are incorrect in stating or implying that nobody has measured the effectiveness of neon colors regarding visibility. Why do you think most highway crews wear neon jackets and vests these days? Because they are fashionable? Neon yellow is the most visible color to the human eye. Google it if you don't believe me. There have been a number of scientific studies that have proven this, and that's why highway workers wear it.

I also find it laughable that you would suggest that cyclists wear neon gear because it's trendy. Neon clothes have been the identifying feature of "Freds" for years among the trendy cyclists. If you go on any fast group rides with racer wannabes, black is the trendy color and has been for ages, unless they are wearing team jerseys. Black is also very trendy among mountain bikers.

I will concede that neon colors have become more trendy recently for college jerseys, running shoes, etc. But it still hasn't caught on among most cyclists, except for the commuters, tourists and Freds.
tarwheel is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 02:51 PM
  #42  
joeyduck
Senior Member
 
joeyduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Nanaimo, BC
Posts: 2,012

Bikes: 1997 Kona Hahana Race Light, 2010 Surly LHT(deceased), 1999 Rocky Mountain Turbo

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I'm trendy and a fred and a chemist nerd. Never would have I expected to have those words together in that context.
joeyduck is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 03:01 PM
  #43  
kickstart
Senior Member
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,355

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by tarwheel View Post
My commute is 30+ miles round-trip, and I ride year-round. Thus, I am riding in the dark for significant amounts of time during the fall, winter and spring. I have observed and learned a few things doing that for the past 8 years.

- Lights make a huge difference, both in terms of seeing the road and being seen by drivers. I use a handlebar and helmet light. The helmet light, in particular, will bring drivers to a stop at side streets, driveways, parking lots, etc. It has happened so many times that there's no way I could keep count. You simply turn your head and look at the driver -- briefly is all it takes -- and they come to a halt. Trust me, it works. I have experienced this time and time again during my commute.
- Reflective gear and bright clothes make a huge difference in terms of being seen. I encounter joggers and walkers on the streets, in the dark, frequently during my commute. I can spot a runner wearing neon clothes at least 1/2 mile away. In contrast, I have come close to hitting a number of runners wearing ninja outfits, even with my very bright LED headlights. Reflective stripes on black clothing helps, but are not nearly as effective as neon colors.

I will concede one point. Sometimes nothing would make a difference, such as circumstances involving distracted drivers, drunk drivers, drivers texting or talking on cell phones, reckless drivers, red-light runners, etc. However, just because lights and bright clothing don't work in every circumstance does not mean that they don't help most of the time. Taking safety measures does not create a protective bubble around you, but they do increase your odds of avoiding accidents.
I like the idea of a helmet light for the reasons mentioned, but the cycle helmet specific lights I've looked at are all way too bright. I've been zapped by cyclists, and it really can kill ones vision for a few moments, I don't want to blind someone and have them hit me. A low output, long running unit with a rear red lamp would be ideal.
kickstart is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 03:07 PM
  #44  
kickstart
Senior Member
 
kickstart's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Kent Wa.
Posts: 5,355

Bikes: 2005 Gazelle Golfo, 1935 Raleigh Sport, 1970 Robin Hood sport, 1974 Schwinn Continental, 1984 Ross MTB/porteur, 2013 Flying Piegon path racer, 2014 Gazelle Toer Populair T8

Mentioned: 12 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 396 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by Caliper View Post
I don't believe this is typically the case. Don't most states regard a bicycle to have the same right of way and responsibilities of a motor vehicle? Well, more like a moped, since we can't usually ride on interstate highways... You're either a pedestrian or you aren't and since law says bikes are not pedestrians, I don't think the crosswalk rights of way apply the same to a cyclist. Basically, I have a hard time seeing an honest cop assigning blame to a motorist after a cyclist blasts out from between two buildings at "15mph" (yeah, just like I always keep to the 10mph speed limit on the MUP )
Here in Washington a cyclist using pedestrian facilities has the same rights and responsibilities as a pedestrian and must yield to pedestrians. There's the codicil that one must allow ample time for others to safely yield, flying through a crosswalk at speed would fail to meet that requirement.
kickstart is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 03:55 PM
  #45  
alan s 
Senior Member
 
alan s's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 6,634
Mentioned: 16 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1320 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 45 Times in 29 Posts
I ride 95% on MUPs, and on a warm evening such as last night when there are lots of people out commuting and exercising, I can easily see other bikes and peds that have lights (even on dogs), and find it very difficult to see bikes and peds without them. If they are difficult to see, it logically follows I'm more likely to hit them, thereby injuring them and myself. Therefore, it I conclude that lights make everyone safer.

I run two 700 lumen lights (bars and helmet), and if aimed up, I can see even the ninjas, but since I have to keep the lights aimed down to avoid blinding others, more often than not they appear out of nowhere at the last second. I don't think anyone can make a rational argument that lights do not increase safety. It's kind of obvious if you ride at night.
alan s is offline  
Old 11-05-14, 06:54 PM
  #46  
downwinded
Senior Member
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: WKY
Posts: 730

Bikes: 2014 Trek Crossrip LTD, 2013 Raleigh Misceo

Mentioned: 5 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Woohaaa! Never thought that op woulda stirred the pot like this. LOL. Actually I think most of us are on the same page here. I cannot imagine arguing against lights, reflectors and bright colored clothing at night. To dismiss those items as not being helpful in being seen more easily at night is beyond me. But some folks, well...

The rider was going in the correct direction of travel and pretty much AFRAP. They were coming towards me as I was sitting on the raised median that is used for a turn lane. I was turning left across 2 lanes. The background was a dark treeline. It's not a completely dark section of the road as there are street lights all along the way. I just think conditions and the background made the rider nearly invisible.

Someone said they should have been on the sidewalk. I know this will make heads spin, but that is absolutely correct. That section is on my daily commute. I handle it a bit differently. If there are cars approaching from behind, I can see them in my mirror , or if there is a car sitting on that median waiting to turn into the store, I stop. I come to a full put-my-foot-down-and-off-the-saddle stop. I will not ride through that lot entrance if there is something coming that would have a chance to hit me. Ever. I have never had a problem. I have had to turn into the business and ride through the parking lot at times of very high traffic when the car could not find the opening, or the driver lacked the skill/timing to make the turn. Figure I don't want to be sitting there in that situation anyway.

Very seldom do I see anyone riding on that 4 lane arterial. Never any regulars. I would never ride there. I don't like being on the sidewalk. I think it to be very dangerous. I can however, control where and when I go without having to place complete trust in the drivers on that busy road. Oh yeah, btw, I have my headlight turned ON, set on low and pointed down. I am not invisible.
downwinded is offline  
Old 11-06-14, 09:09 AM
  #47  
nelson249
"Per Ardua ad Surly"
 
nelson249's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Kitchener, Ontario
Posts: 1,416

Bikes: Bianchi Specialissima, Mongoose Hilltopper ATB, Surly Cross-Check, Norco City Glide

Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I think Dave does have a point that cyclists cannot always count on being seen but not taking steps to lessen the chance of being missed is irresponsible. Besides, it's the law. Thanks for reminder, just threw the bike light battery on the charger.
nelson249 is offline  
Old 11-06-14, 09:21 AM
  #48  
RaleighSport 
Hogosha Sekai
 
RaleighSport's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: STS
Posts: 6,641

Bikes: Leader 725, Centurion Turbo, Scwhinn Peloton, Schwinn Premis, GT Tequesta, Bridgestone CB-2,72' Centurion Lemans, 72 Raleigh Competition

Mentioned: 14 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 55 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I must confess I was running late the other evening from helping a family member with a computer problem and was caught in the dark at the tale end of my ride.. I would have made it in just as the sun fully set but there was a dog on the main road and I stopped to get it off the road and home, but the riding in the dark after that part felt SKETCHY! That night I ordered a bottle dynamo set for my around "town" bike (I don't live in town) so that scenario will never play out again. FWIW I have a few battery powered light sets etc, but in this case the assumption was they were not needed.. lesson learned, always have some kind of lighting.
__________________
Play stupid games, win stupid prizes.
RaleighSport is offline  
Old 11-06-14, 09:33 AM
  #49  
2manybikes
Dog is my co-pilot
 
2manybikes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 17,563

Bikes: 2 many

Mentioned: 10 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1000 Post(s)
Liked 17 Times in 14 Posts
Originally Posted by RaleighSport View Post
I must confess I was running late the other evening from helping a family member with a computer problem and was caught in the dark at the tale end of my ride.. I would have made it in just as the sun fully set but there was a dog on the main road and I stopped to get it off the road and home, but the riding in the dark after that part felt SKETCHY! That night I ordered a bottle dynamo set for my around "town" bike (I don't live in town) so that scenario will never play out again. FWIW I have a few battery powered light sets etc, but in this case the assumption was they were not needed.. lesson learned, always have some kind of lighting.
A responsible person like you learns from a mistake and does something about it. The ones that keep doing the same thing over and over get annoying.
2manybikes is offline  
Old 11-06-14, 12:26 PM
  #50  
joeyduck
Senior Member
 
joeyduck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Nanaimo, BC
Posts: 2,012

Bikes: 1997 Kona Hahana Race Light, 2010 Surly LHT(deceased), 1999 Rocky Mountain Turbo

Mentioned: 33 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 86 Post(s)
Likes: 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Originally Posted by nelson249 View Post
I think Dave does have a point that cyclists cannot always count on being seen but not taking steps to lessen the chance of being missed is irresponsible. Besides, it's the law. Thanks for reminder, just threw the bike light battery on the charger.
I think this is an accurate summation of the previous posts. Do what you can to be seen but do not expect to be seen. I think we have to recall we are cyclists and we notice other cyclists, where others are oblivious.

Last night I had a car try to turn in front of me on to a side street while a pedestrian was crossing.

I wear full neon green/yellow, a reflective vest, spoke and wheel reflectors, reflective sidewalls and reflective front tape on the fork. This is in addition to a 900 lumen Chinese lamp on high and a flashing front light. I was biking along a busy park on the designate bike path in full VC mode.

I had a coworker describe me as a yellow highlighter riding a vampire in the sun.
joeyduck is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.