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Things your fellow commuters do that annoy you

Old 01-03-15, 06:32 PM
  #251  
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Originally Posted by john4789
What are you suggesting? OYL doesn't work on a small percentage of riders (newcomers/visitors), therefore it shouldn't be used at all?
Numerous posts in BF over the years indicate that this specific phrase is frequently misunderstood by the recipients, often "annoying" the shouting bicyclist poster who expects others to share an affection for jargon; but the jargon speakers keep at it anyhow.

Are you suggesting that annoyed commuters are in error by thinking that an annoying number of pedestrians and bicyclists (of all race, creed, color or national origin) respond "incorrectly" by moving in opposite right direction than intended by the jargon shouters?
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Old 01-03-15, 06:47 PM
  #252  
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The last 2 times I warned pedestrians with "on your left" I was met with thanks for the warning . By the way, I don't shout it so maybe that helps. I think only a couple of times anyone has moved the wrong direction or not at all. Based on my experience, it is effective, overwhelming so.
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Old 01-03-15, 06:58 PM
  #253  
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Originally Posted by scroca
The last 2 times I warned pedestrians with "on your left" I was met with thanks for the warning . By the way, I don't shout it so maybe that helps. I think only a couple of times anyone has moved the wrong direction or not at all. Based on my experience, it is effective, overwhelming so.
This is it. The way some people go careening though pedestrians shouting at them, it's like barking orders and they get wound up and want to go off on someone. I've seen it happen.

You're also slowing down and passing at a reasonable speed because you don't have to shout it to warn them in time, and there's time enough for them to thank you. That's also kind of key in my opinion.

I like to say "I am about to pass you on your left" because it gives them time to process it, and I've adjusted speed to say all that. When I say anything - I like my little bell better.

I don't actually see commuters shouting at people in these parts, partly because I don't see that many at all but also I think because they're more mindful about it. Because they are or might be there regularly, encountering the same people. I know that's how I see it.
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Old 01-03-15, 07:02 PM
  #254  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Blah Blah Blah
I'm not suggesting anything, I've stated my opinion directly in this thread if you care to read it. I've also offered my suggestions to other users which might help them out. I'm asking you what you are suggesting on the topic because I don't see you adding anything constructive to the discussion, just whining about other posters. So, what are you suggesting people do?
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Old 01-03-15, 07:04 PM
  #255  
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Originally Posted by wphamilton
I like to say "I am about to pass you on your left"
Shh... all that 'advanced jargon' is going to make ILTB's ears start to bleed.
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Old 01-03-15, 07:17 PM
  #256  
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I still don't understand why so many people don't want to use a bell ??...Are you scared that a bell will spoil the look and aesthetics of your bicycle ??..You're thinking that bells are only suitable for little kiddies bikes...Or maybe you're so obsessed about weight and thinking that a little bell will add to much weight to your carbon fibre racing machine ??
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Old 01-03-15, 07:19 PM
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Originally Posted by john4789
Shh... all that 'advanced jargon' is going to make ILTB's ears start to bleed.
I know it's hard to believe, but majority of people will respond much better to a bell then cycling specific jargon.
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Old 01-03-15, 07:22 PM
  #258  
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Originally Posted by john4789
What are you suggesting? OYL doesn't work on a small percentage of riders (newcomers/visitors), therefore it shouldn't be used at all?
OYL works well at slow speeds like when you are hiking up a trail and want to pass someone. It's not very effective for a cyclist passing a pedestrian unless you're passing at walking speeds. I ride on roads and behave like a vehicle so talking to pedestrians is unnecessary.
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Old 01-03-15, 07:42 PM
  #259  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
I still don't understand why so many people don't want to use a bell ??...Are you scared that a bell will spoil the look and aesthetics of your bicycle ??..You're thinking that bells are only suitable for little kiddies bikes...Or maybe you're so obsessed about weight and thinking that a little bell will add to much weight to your carbon fibre racing machine ??
I plead guilty on all three counts.
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Old 01-03-15, 08:06 PM
  #260  
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Originally Posted by cobrabyte
Looked like they were part of the 'gonna start riding to get fit for 2015' crowd. Department store bikes and dressed in fitness clothes but not necessarily cycling specific clothing.
Oh here's an annoyance: people who tell me I NEED cycling specific clothing to cycle.

Originally Posted by john4789
I find people respond much more to the bell. I usually give two dings when I am about 15ft back, then another single ding right as I start to overtake. I think the difference in volume at the different distances gives the other rider a natural sense of my speed and direction (such as left side).

I'd recommend you try it.
That's less than a second at 15mph.

Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Ya mean teaching newcomers/visitors in this country the basic jargon of this country isn't the right thing to do when cycling in the park? Who wudda thunk it?
Who wants to start up conversations while commuting?
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Old 01-03-15, 08:35 PM
  #261  
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Originally Posted by Sullalto
That's less than a second at 15mph.
...if you are passing a stationary object. I commute on city streets, not a MUP so generally I am passing moving cyclists in which the 15ft distance provides a few seconds of warning.
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Old 01-03-15, 08:57 PM
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Ah, I'm either downtown(taking the middle of the lane, so who cares), a mup, or very lightly trafficked roads where I just go wide.
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Old 01-03-15, 09:04 PM
  #263  
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I've found yelling HEADS UP is a great way to get stupid peds to jump out of the way.
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Old 01-03-15, 10:31 PM
  #264  
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Originally Posted by john4789
...if you are passing a stationary object. I commute on city streets, not a MUP so generally I am passing moving cyclists in which the 15ft distance provides a few seconds of warning.
Why would a cyclist riding on a city street need a "warning" of any kind from another cyclist, unless said cyclist is a jek passing without sufficient lateral distance clearance to pass safely?
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Old 01-03-15, 11:07 PM
  #265  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Numerous posts in BF over the years indicate that this specific phrase is frequently misunderstood by the recipients, often "annoying" the shouting bicyclist poster who expects others to share an affection for jargon; but the jargon speakers keep at it anyhow.

Are you suggesting that annoyed commuters are in error by thinking that an annoying number of pedestrians and bicyclists (of all race, creed, color or national origin) respond "incorrectly" by moving in opposite right direction than intended by the jargon shouters?
I would say that the problem is not with the phrase but rather that some cyclists are too easily annoyed. Perhaps they fail to understand that "on your left" is something you say as a courtesy to the person you are about to pass and not a command to do something. Passing safely is the responsibility of the person doing the passing. If they are bothered by having to slow down for people on a busy MUP then they should ride on the street instead.

Having a more widely known protocol for safely using busy trails is a good goal. I'm not sure best how to achieve it but deciding not to use an already established phrase like "on your left" doesn't make much sense to me. Should we also abandon the signal for a right turn because not everyone knows what it means?


Originally Posted by wolfchild
I still don't understand why so many people don't want to use a bell ??...Are you scared that a bell will spoil the look and aesthetics of your bicycle ??..You're thinking that bells are only suitable for little kiddies bikes...Or maybe you're so obsessed about weight and thinking that a little bell will add to much weight to your carbon fibre racing machine ??
I think something you and both ILTB are missing is that "on your left" is a phrase used by all trail users, - not just cyclists. Trail users include runners, walkers, inline skaters, segways, carriages, and even people on horseback in some places. Cyclists aren't the only ones that ever want to pass and a mouth is signaling device that everyone will have. Not all of them are going to have bells. Besides, using a bell doesn't guarantee that a pedestrian is going to act in a predictable way any more than saying "on your left" does.

Whatever its roots are, "On your left" isn't just cycling jargon anymore and not a reason to be opposed to its use.

Last edited by tjspiel; 01-03-15 at 11:44 PM.
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Old 01-04-15, 12:08 AM
  #266  
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
Are you scared that a bell will spoil the look and aesthetics of your bicycle ??
Absolutely. As vain as it is, yes. Also why I don't wear a high visibility vest or bright yellow/green reflective clothing.
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Old 01-04-15, 12:28 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
I still don't understand why so many people don't want to use a bell ??...
I don't tack anything on my bike that I see as unnecessary. At least for me, a bell most certainly is in that group. But I do see how other bicyclists, who may spend a lot of time on MUP's and such around peds, could find one handy. Good for them.
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Old 01-04-15, 01:53 AM
  #268  
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Originally Posted by I-Like-To-Bike
Why would a cyclist riding on a city street need a "warning" of any kind from another cyclist, unless said cyclist is a jek passing without sufficient lateral distance clearance to pass safely?
Yeah... on a street-side bike path, I usually look behind myself, then signal and move over into the traffic lane to pass a bicycle when it is clear enough, so you aren't in the same lane as the person in the bike path. Even without a bike path, I usually give them plenty of space.

Around here, we have no lane designations on a MUT, so in a sense, the whole path is one's lane. So, I think it is polite to inform a person one's overtaking that one is there, whether is is by bell, Hello, Heads Up, Left, Right, etc. I also tend to be a bit more central in the path, and there are sometimes more obstructions such as cracks, holes, and debris which could cause an unexpected swerve.

Perhaps I should try one of those canned air horns for those people with headphones.
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Old 01-04-15, 02:28 AM
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Originally Posted by tjspiel
Having a more widely known protocol for safely using busy trails is a good goal. I'm not sure best how to achieve it but deciding not to use an already established phrase like "on your left" doesn't make much sense to me. Should we also abandon the signal for a right turn because not everyone knows what it means?
I don't think using verbal warnings are bad, I use them myself sometimes, its the resistance to using a bell by some that I question.

As I mentioned earlier, a bell is universally equated with a bicycle and understood to be a warning that people will normally move away from, while a verbal warning isn't anywhere near as specific or universal, and its a normal reaction to turn towards someone speaking.
It simply seems like the route of least resistance to first use what will most likely produce the desired natural reaction.

The bell on my wifes bike is so small and inconspicuous, its hard to appreciate concerns about weight or aesthetics.
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Old 01-04-15, 07:45 AM
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Originally Posted by wolfchild
I still don't understand why so many people don't want to use a bell ??...Are you scared that a bell will spoil the look and aesthetics of your bicycle ??..You're thinking that bells are only suitable for little kiddies bikes...Or maybe you're so obsessed about weight and thinking that a little bell will add to much weight to your carbon fibre racing machine ??
If it IS a racing machine, bells are not allowed under USA Cycling and UCI rules. And almost certainly not under triathlon rules either.

And since cyclists who race also tend to be the ones who ride the most, you see a larger number of true racing bikes than you'd otherwise expect.

Maybe you didn't realize that. Why are you assuming other riders do things only for reasons you can look down on?
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Old 01-04-15, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by achoo
If it IS a racing machine, bells are not allowed under USA Cycling and UCI rules. And almost certainly not under triathlon rules either.
Commuting and doing training rides on city streets and MUPS is not the same as racing or triathlon, UCI rules don't apply to commuting or training rides. It's very easy to attach a bell to a racing bike when using it for commuting/training rides and then remove the bell when using that same bike for an actual racing. Like I said before I think the opposition to bells has more to do with looks and aesthetics then anything else.
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Old 01-04-15, 10:22 AM
  #272  
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I love my fellow commuters. Anyone on a bike gets my affection. The fellows in giant trucks tossing drinks at me are the problem.
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Old 01-04-15, 10:26 AM
  #273  
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In BC it is law to have a bell. I doubt they ever enforce the law though.

I quite like having a bell the few times I pass people. I usually ding it a few times as I get closer and then as I am about to pass. I then couple the pass with a greeting.

I have one on my commuter that works great and sits right on my lever.

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Old 01-04-15, 01:22 PM
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Originally Posted by kickstart
\As I mentioned earlier, a bell is universally equated with a bicycle...
in my experience, bells provoke far more confusion than a polite (e.g. not yelled) on your left, coming through, or heads up.
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Old 01-04-15, 01:26 PM
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Originally Posted by joeyduck
In BC it is law to have a bell. I doubt they ever enforce the law though.

I quite like having a bell the few times I pass people. I usually ding it a few times as I get closer and then as I am about to pass. I then couple the pass with a greeting.
speaking as walker, i absolutely loathe bells. maniacal dring dringing of loud brass bells really pisses me off. imo, walkers have absolutely priority over cyclists on sidewalks/mups so cyclists should only ring their bells in emergency situations. ringing a bell to warn someone is, imo, the equivalent of honking a car horn at a cyclist without cause.

Last edited by spare_wheel; 01-04-15 at 01:29 PM.
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