Notices
Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like : "Unbound Gravel". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Winter clothing

Old 11-09-16, 04:27 PM
  #1  
Sunshine
Thread Starter
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,720

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11060 Post(s)
Liked 7,615 Times in 4,247 Posts
Winter clothing

Curious what everyone uses for 20-35deg competitive rides.

I just decided to do a gravel race which will be at the start of March. That time of year is typically frozen gravel with some snow on the roadside.

Admittedly, i dont bust out bikes if its below 40, typically. I have colder weather arm and leg warmers, but thats not gonna cut it for 65mi of 25deg riding.

I would figue barmitts, a baklava, shoe covers, windproof jacket and layered shirts as a start. Add in arm and leg warmers, but what else for cutting out the piercing cold wind?
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 11-09-16, 05:15 PM
  #2  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,478

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5902 Post(s)
Liked 3,522 Times in 2,103 Posts
Are you doing Cirrem? That's a heck of a ride. I'd opt for thin layers made of anything but cotton; wool is a fine choice but so are many of the synthetics. It's tough to regulate your temp when working hard in cold weather. Feet and hands are particularly tough.

I have a windproof layer for commutes but for hard work, you may tend to oversweat with one. I like an old school wind jacket without any kind of treatment since all that does is interfere with sweating when you are working hard. They can be hard to find though since the high tech stuff sells. Alternatively use a soft shell as an outer layer.

When it's that cold, my feet just die on me. I like insulated winter boots and bmx style pedals for really cold weather.

Last edited by bikemig; 11-09-16 at 05:28 PM.
bikemig is offline  
Old 11-09-16, 06:02 PM
  #3  
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,608

Bikes: 2022 Specialized Allez Sprint custom build, 2019 Giant Defy Advanced Pro 0, 2018 Seven Mudhoney Pro custom build, 2017 Raleigh Stuntman, various others

Mentioned: 7 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 782 Post(s)
Liked 475 Times in 238 Posts
I ride in this temperature frequently. Tips:
1. My feet are the biggest worry. Cold feet will make a ride miserable quickly. I'd use thick, full coverage booties. I tape any vents on the bottom of the shoes. Use a bit of tin foil inside your shoes wrapped around your toes. Also use chemical warmers if your feet run cold.
2. I've found my hands typically don't get cold even in very cold weather. I typically stick with thin full finger gloves down to about 10 degrees. YMMV. I'll use slightly thicker CC ski gloves if the temps are really low but even them my hands start to sweat.
3. A balaclava is a good idea. I really like the Smartwool stuff, it's really warm for how thin it is. Make sure your neck is covered, that makes a huge difference. I use a wool dickie in really cold weather. Also, something that covers your mouth and captures some of the heat from your breath is good in really cold weather: it will get wet with condensation but it makes it easier to breathe.
4. Your torso shouldn't get too cold unless the wind can get to it. Make sure to wear something windproof. Also, the old hiking cliche is true here: multiple thin layers are always far better than one thick layer. Lastly, if anything stays wet, it will make you cold: avoid cotton. Wool is best, polypro is second best.
5. Keeping your legs warm will make you less prone to fatigue. I prefer my legs to be too warm than too cold. I use bib tights with windproof panels on the front. They will keep you warm in any conditions.
6. If it's really cold, I wear a ski helmet and googles. Costco has a good deal on them right now. Then again, I sometimes ride in single digit weather.

Last edited by Hiro11; 11-09-16 at 06:07 PM.
Hiro11 is offline  
Old 11-10-16, 08:11 AM
  #4  
Sunshine
Thread Starter
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,720

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11060 Post(s)
Liked 7,615 Times in 4,247 Posts
Originally Posted by bikemig
Are you doing Cirrem? That's a heck of a ride.

When it's that cold, my feet just die on me.
Yup, that Buffalo105 event nudged me to decide to try Cirrem and see what I can pace. Itll be a funny test since I have no baseline to compare to.
Also, I want something to look forward to/train for during the winter. This will keep me on the trainer and get me outside on the roads too.

Agreed on the feet issue. Feet and legs are what I am most concerned about.




Originally Posted by Hiro11
I ride in this temperature frequently. Tips:
1. My feet are the biggest worry. Cold feet will make a ride miserable quickly. I'd use thick, full coverage booties. I tape any vents on the bottom of the shoes. Use a bit of tin foil inside your shoes wrapped around your toes. Also use chemical warmers if your feet run cold.

5. Keeping your legs warm will make you less prone to fatigue. I prefer my legs to be too warm than too cold. I use bib tights with windproof panels on the front. They will keep you warm in any conditions.

Good idea on making sure any foot vents are covered. Ill look into something for my legs that is windproof and not just wind resistant due to being a tight knit lycra.









I figured there are some other crazies on this board who do long rides/races in the winter. Good stuff so far, thanks.
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 11-10-16, 11:34 AM
  #5  
Banned
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: NW,Oregon Coast
Posts: 43,598

Bikes: 8

Mentioned: 197 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7607 Post(s)
Liked 1,359 Times in 865 Posts
40F ? I Go out for Pints, in the Rain..

Polyester sweatpants, with Long Underwear too Hiking Boots with thick sox, Wicking Poly base layer Or Wool

sweater + wind breaker / rain gear ?
fietsbob is offline  
Old 11-10-16, 12:21 PM
  #6  
Senior Member
 
79pmooney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 12,985

Bikes: (2) ti TiCycles, 2007 w/ triple and 2011 fixed, 1979 Peter Mooney, ~1983 Trek 420 now fixed and ~1973 Raleigh Carlton Competition gravel grinder

Mentioned: 131 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4866 Post(s)
Liked 4,018 Times in 2,611 Posts
Get out and ride in those temps. We are all so different that the world's best internet advice could be way off for you. Some people are compact bundles of heat. Some are built with feet and hands a long ways from their hearts and heat source attached with poorly insulated thin limbs. Some people run hot. Some run cold.

You will be out there for 3 hours. Either overdressed and swaetingheavily or underdressed could make your ride miserable or worse.

Tricks I find helpful are: wind front tights. Before they existed I used to put newspaper down the fronts on my legs over thermals and under my tights. (Newspaper still works. An old trick of the pros and still used in mountain races. If you watch footage of the Tour de France - good footage of the rest of the race, not just the highly paid hotshots at the front - you will see the domestique riders stuffing their jerseys with newspaper at the mountain summits before cold descents.

Feet need lots of space around them for socks. I now have the Northwave boots but I also have shoes a full size larger than summer just to get more socks and better circulation. If you go standard shoes try this trick. Bare feet in produce bags. Socks, whatever your shoes will allow and not be tight. Another produce bag. A very thin men's dress sock. There are those socks that old men wear that are close to knee high, usually black, almost see-through thin and bvery stretchy. They are perfect. With this setup, you have an insulated layer that never gets wet, either from your feet or the outside. Your feet will sit in a bath of sweat, but they will be warm and comfy.

Think about how you are going to shed heat. The day may well get warmer or even warmer, then cooler. Esp for the latter, excess heat and sweat can be a real problem after the day cools and you tire and slow down. Armwarmers work really well here. Vests and jackets are good but may require that you stop. Here newspaper under the jersey can work really well since you can pull it out while riding. Not as nice the second time around if you need it, but much, much better than without.

I like mittens much better than gloves for several reasons. I get cold hands. FIngers together are much warmer. I use buckskin chopper mitts and wool or synthetic inner mittens. I get the biggest mitts I can find. Sliding them on and off is easy so getting to pockets for food, etc, isn't hard. When I warm up, I pull the inners put and the leather mitts works as well as cycling gloves up to around 70 degrees. (Do check to make sure you can use your brifters with them. Again, do some riders before to sort this stuff out.)

There are a lot more tricks, but this should give you a start.

Ben
79pmooney is offline  
Old 11-10-16, 01:05 PM
  #7  
NYC
 
nycphotography's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,714
Mentioned: 18 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1169 Post(s)
Liked 107 Times in 62 Posts
If this is motivation to ride in winter, then use riding in winter as your chance to figure out what gear you need for this. No two people will need the same gear, as everyone has different metabolisms, circulation, fat layers, cold asthma conditions, etc etc etc.

That said, why anyone would do something like this as a competitive ride is beyond me. While doing the ride seems a quirky fun adventure, making it a quasi-race seems more a test of poor judgement / stupidity than of strength and skill.

Way too many ways for things to go sideways, and making it timed/competitive encourages people to sacrifice safety and common sense to make time.

Riding past frostbite, for example, rather than slowing down and warming up, can have pretty severe consequences.

Another example, bust your ass on the ice dressed for racing and not for hanging out and it can get dangerous in a big hurry while you wait for medical care.
nycphotography is offline  
Old 11-10-16, 01:57 PM
  #8  
Sunshine
Thread Starter
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,720

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11060 Post(s)
Liked 7,615 Times in 4,247 Posts
Originally Posted by 79pmooney
Get out and ride in those temps.
Agreed. It its still 40-55deg as low and high here though, so im more trying to think of what to do for when its those temps and I am out riding. Actually doing is the best way to learn though.
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 11-10-16, 02:09 PM
  #9  
Sunshine
Thread Starter
 
mstateglfr's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2014
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 16,720

Bikes: '18 class built steel roadbike, '19 Fairlight Secan, '88 Schwinn Premis , Black Mountain Cycles Monstercross V4, '89 Novara Trionfo

Mentioned: 124 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11060 Post(s)
Liked 7,615 Times in 4,247 Posts
Originally Posted by nycphotography
That said, why anyone would do something like this as a competitive ride is beyond me. While doing the ride seems a quirky fun adventure, making it a quasi-race seems more a test of poor judgement / stupidity than of strength and skill.

Way too many ways for things to go sideways, and making it timed/competitive encourages people to sacrifice safety and common sense to make time.

Riding past frostbite, for example, rather than slowing down and warming up, can have pretty severe consequences.

Another example, bust your ass on the ice dressed for racing and not for hanging out and it can get dangerous in a big hurry while you wait for medical care.
CIRREM

Yeah...i certainly hadnt considered it poor judgement or stupid. Its a bike ride at the start of March, not some amateurs trying to scale Mt Everest without proper gear and Sherpas.
I certainly will slow down if my body isnt doing well. I can call someone if my bike explodes and I live to tell about it.

I dont really know how there are way too many ways for things to go sideways. This is 65mi of rarely traveled roads and a whole lot of people riding them. I will be, at most, 30mi from my house at any point of the event.

As for your comment on it being timed, well that applies to any bike race regardless of location or time of year. People sacrifice safety and common sense to make time in all types of races...no just cycling. They do it in all types of competition, actually.

If I hit ice, that will suck. I will fall and might get hurt. Same as if I hit a patch of wet leaves in the fall. Same as if I hit a rock or pothole in the summer.
mstateglfr is online now  
Old 11-10-16, 02:12 PM
  #10  
Senior Member
 
bikemig's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Middle Earth (aka IA)
Posts: 20,478

Bikes: A bunch of old bikes and a few new ones

Mentioned: 179 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5902 Post(s)
Liked 3,522 Times in 2,103 Posts
I'm tempted to do this ride but I doubt I'll stay in good enough shape in the winter to do this by the end of Feb., .

I do a lot of winter riding in DM though. It's not too bad.
bikemig is offline  
Related Topics
Thread
Thread Starter
Forum
Replies
Last Post
DreamRider85
Winter Cycling
19
01-27-16 07:48 AM
SammyJ
Clydesdales/Athenas (200+ lb / 91+ kg)
14
11-01-14 07:55 AM
Notgrownup
General Cycling Discussion
28
10-07-13 04:59 AM
Nick Bain
Winter Cycling
6
08-22-12 02:25 PM
marksru16
Road Cycling
10
09-27-10 02:26 PM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service -

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.