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Yokozuna Motoko vs TRP Hylex vs TRP HYRD

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Yokozuna Motoko vs TRP Hylex vs TRP HYRD

Old 12-06-16, 04:24 PM
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Yokozuna Motoko vs TRP Hylex vs TRP HYRD

Hi all, this has probably been asked already, but I couldn't find anything that compares these, so here we go. Anyone ride more than one of these? If so, which did you prefer? Prices seem about the same, depending on where they are purchased, with perhaps a slight edge to the Yokozunas because they come with cables... I'm already set up with bar end shifters and have brake levers, so I'm not really interested in SRAM or Shimano hydraulic groups. These will be going on my Wolverine, as an all road drop bar bike. I need hydraulics cause my flat bar bike spoiled me, haha. Thanks!
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Old 12-06-16, 08:40 PM
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Anecdotally, road people really like the hybrid mechanical/hydraulic systems, but mtb'ers still find them inadequate and want a full hydraulic system.


But the hybrid systems can be set up with cycocross interrupter levers, so there's that.
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Old 12-07-16, 11:12 AM
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In road discs, I've only used the BB7Rs and TRP Hy/Rds. The Hy/Rds are superior to the BB7Rs; they provide strong braking power and they're easy to tune so the pads are close without rubbing.

The Hy/Rds aren't quite as strong as the MTB full hydraulics I've used (Shimano XT M785), but they're pretty good. And they work with any existing road brake lever or brifter.

I'd like to try the Shimano ST-RS685 road hydraulics some time, but I don't have the cash for that kind of setup for myself.
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Old 12-07-16, 04:25 PM
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I've used Hy/Rds and the Shimano RS785 systems in addition to various purely mechanical systems. I understand you aren't interested in the Shimano system, but people I've talked to say that it performs similarly to the Hylex, so it might still be a useful comparison.

The Hy/Rds are very good, but not quite at the same level as a full hydraulic system. The automatic adjustment for pad wear works well with the Hy/Rds as long as you don't accidentally close them off using the barrel adjuster. Compressionless housing makes a big difference. The main advantage of a pure hydraulic system over the Hy/Rds is that there is essentially no cable related compression. Some hydraulic hoses flex a little (and Shimano thinks you'll want that) but you can get hoses that do not. The practical result of this is that very little pressure is required at the lever to get a lot of stopping power at the brake. With the Hy/Rds you just have to squeeze a bit harder, which can be tough on your hands over the course of a long descent.

The downside of a full hydraulic system is that if you aren't already skilled at it (and maybe even if you are) bleeding the brakes can be a bit of work. With cables there isn't much to mess up. With full hydraulic even a little bit of air in the line can make braking terrible. Once that's done you have no more maintenance to do for quite some time, but the initial setup (and eventual rebleeding) is some work. The Hy/Rds are as easy to setup as any cable-actuated disc brake.

I haven't used the Yokozuna brakes, but the fact that they opted for a closed hydraulic system is interesting. This means they don't automatically adjust for brake pad wear. For a lot of uses, that's not really a problem. You turn a knob and things are great. Unlike traditional mechanical discs the pads move in from both sides so this simple adjustment won't cause any problems with rotor centering. This also avoids the problem where you can accidentally lock up the brakes by squeezing the lever with no wheel installed.

I think if I were in your position my preference would be:

1. Hylex
2. Motoko
3. Hy/Rd

but with essentially personal preference separating the two hybrid options.
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Old 12-07-16, 05:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Tim_Iowa
In road discs, I've only used the BB7Rs and TRP Hy/Rds. The Hy/Rds are superior to the BB7Rs; they provide strong braking power and they're easy to tune so the pads are close without rubbing.

The Hy/Rds aren't quite as strong as the MTB full hydraulics I've used (Shimano XT M785), but they're pretty good. And they work with any existing road brake lever or brifter.

I'd like to try the Shimano ST-RS685 road hydraulics some time, but I don't have the cash for that kind of setup for myself.
Yeah, the RS685 came along after I started collecting parts, and are pretty spendy, for me anyway.

I've used the BB7R, TRP Spyre, and Shimano's CX road disc, cx-77 (I think?) and the lower end road disc BR 37 (also a guess as to model number). So far, BB7 was the best, in stopping power, modulation, and setup/maintenance. I think that's largely because Avid set the whole kit up as a system - calipers, rotors, pads, everything. TRP did that too with the Spyre, but they shipped with garbage pads and rotors, and I could never get positive brake feel from them. Both Shimano brakes were great; similar in power, feel, and setup to the BB7. Shimano never specified a rotor to use though, they just gave us a table and said pick one.

So, I have tried a bunch of different cable disc brakes, and have used hydraulic brakes on flat bar bikes for a while, and have come to the conclusion that no cable disc will ever work like even a mid-range hydraulic. It's just not gonna happen. I'm hoping that the HYRD or Motoko can at least come close, cause then I can use it with whatever levers/shifters I want, but if the Hylex is really the only way other than Shimano or SRAM, I guess that's the one.
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