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drop bars on Mt bike

Old 12-13-16, 06:34 PM
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drop bars on Mt bike

I am creating the perfect no nonsense graveler using my old 26 inch 1990's Mongoose rockadille. I am going to add drop bars and bar end shifters. After reading how vicious the Dirty Kanza and some other grinder events are to tires and gear I am afraid that my current steed a 1974 Raleigh Record 5 speed with 1 1/4 tires is not a good choice. I wanted to ask what have been the experience of people using drop bars. I read that compact bars are best and there are many mt bike specific drop style bars but the cost close to $100 each.
I figure a good adjustable stem is a safe bet for getting proper fit.
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Old 12-13-16, 07:36 PM
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Originally Posted by thehammerdog
I am creating the perfect no nonsense graveler using my old 26 inch 1990's Mongoose rockadille. I am going to add drop bars and bar end shifters. After reading how vicious the Dirty Kanza and some other grinder events are to tires and gear I am afraid that my current steed a 1974 Raleigh Record 5 speed with 1 1/4 tires is not a good choice. I wanted to ask what have been the experience of people using drop bars. I read that compact bars are best and there are many mt bike specific drop style bars but the cost close to $100 each.
I figure a good adjustable stem is a safe bet for getting proper fit.
Sounds like you got a good plan. No, I don't think you want to do 1 1/4 tires (my personal opinion). That's about 30mm. I did the DK100 last year and almost everyone I saw had at least 35-40mm tires. I had 29x2.2 tires which were definitely wider than average (and probably slowed me down) but they went over everything just fine.

No experience with a drop bar conversion, except that I've contemplated doing one myself. You will definitely be in the market for a high rise stem...an adjustable stem will help you figure out what you need. I will say that if you want another option, consider some of the alt-mtb bars available...they might let you keep existing levers and still give you decent hand positions. I put the Jones loop bar on my rigid bike and have generally been happy. The VO crazy bar is another one to consider.
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Old 12-13-16, 08:28 PM
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Originally Posted by wheelsmcgee
Sounds like you got a good plan. No, I don't think you want to do 1 1/4 tires (my personal opinion). That's about 30mm. I did the DK100 last year and almost everyone I saw had at least 35-40mm tires. I had 29x2.2 tires which were definitely wider than average (and probably slowed me down) but they went over everything just fine.

No experience with a drop bar conversion, except that I've contemplated doing one myself. You will definitely be in the market for a high rise stem...an adjustable stem will help you figure out what you need. I will say that if you want another option, consider some of the alt-mtb bars available...they might let you keep existing levers and still give you decent hand positions. I put the Jones loop bar on my rigid bike and have generally been happy. The VO crazy bar is another one to consider.
I like the Jones bar looks cool but not cheap. I need new shifters thinking Microshift 7 brifters....after searching for cheap bar end shifting...they cost $70. I am going for the look and comfort.got low Bobby VeeRubber 2.2 tires.
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Old 12-13-16, 11:18 PM
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My opinion on drop bars- they are good.

No odea how thst Goose eill turn out as a drop bar bike, but my guess is the stem will have a significant rise in order to fit you. And it wont have a long reach as the bike was built for hand placement in line with the stem and not in front of the stem by a handful of inches.

Bars like the salsa cowchipper, the origin8 gary os sweep, the soma highway one, and the on-one midge are all bars which could work well as they are shallow drops, and dobt have long ramps which will keep thenreach to the levers to a minimum. All but the soma bars are also flared.
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Old 12-14-16, 06:05 AM
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Probably the cheapest conversion and the easiest is to simply use trekking bars (your existing brake levers and shifters will work) and find the appropriate tires. Trekking bars are comfy and you avoid some of the issues you run into when converting a mtb to drops. This is my 1991 Specialized Team Stumpjumper:





If going with drop bars (and this is a good conversion), the key is to try to mimic your road bike set up which can be tough given the long top tube typically found on MTBs. Here is a thread with a ton of conversions to get you started on some ideas:

https://www.bikeforums.net/classic-vi...nversions.html

Last edited by bikemig; 12-14-16 at 06:12 AM.
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Old 12-14-16, 06:21 AM
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Do you have a geometry chart for your bike?

Sizing/fitting a dropbar MTB is harder for older bikes with short headtubes.
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Old 12-14-16, 07:31 AM
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I've got three dropbar mtb's in my ten bike stable. I've always had to run a drastically shorter stem. Just like "mstateglfr" mentioned as you have to compensate for the additional reach of road bars over the original flat mtb bars. I have riser stems on two of the bikes and a just a stubby traditional stem on my carbon dropbar mtb.

This isn't rocket science but mind you some conversions look a little different then others to get the fit correct but each one I've done have been my Swiss Army knife of bikes in my stable.
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Old 12-14-16, 08:48 AM
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I have a '92 Schwinn Crisscross that I converted to drops with bar-ends and I love it. I'm actually using an old set of full-size ergo bars. The bars were too wide and too deep for me on the road bike I took them off and they almost went in the trash. But on the conversion, the short reach, steeply angled stem puts the drops at a normal road position, the hoods a little higher, and the tops considerably higher. I find having a greater difference between hand positions on gravel suits my riding style.

When doing these conversions, you have to really pay attention to your frame geometry. Short head tubes are a common challenge. Long ETTs are also common (though there was a period of time where MTBs were running shorter reach with really long stems). You can save yourself some trial and error if you plug all the measurements into bikecad.ca so you can see where different stem/bar choices will put the contact points and compare that to a normal road setup that you're happy with.
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Old 12-14-16, 09:43 AM
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Originally Posted by Kopsis
I have a '92 Schwinn Crisscross that I converted to drops with bar-ends and I love it. I'm actually using an old set of full-size ergo bars. The bars were too wide and too deep for me on the road bike I took them off and they almost went in the trash. But on the conversion, the short reach, steeply angled stem puts the drops at a normal road position, the hoods a little higher, and the tops considerably higher. I find having a greater difference between hand positions on gravel suits my riding style.

When doing these conversions, you have to really pay attention to your frame geometry. Short head tubes are a common challenge. Long ETTs are also common (though there was a period of time where MTBs were running shorter reach with really long stems). You can save yourself some trial and error if you plug all the measurements into bikecad.ca so you can see where different stem/bar choices will put the contact points and compare that to a normal road setup that you're happy with.
The stem length and angle are key..I have been trying to figure out exactly what is best size..bike on the trainer now do the measurements begin....found cheap eBay bars/ stems.. adjustable seem to be the answer to good fit
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Old 12-14-16, 10:07 AM
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thehammerdog, Howdy;

Been doing some research for doing the same thing. Stumbled across this;
Stem Comparison Tool | yojimg.net
to help figure out how to get the drop hand position and reach at the same
place as the hand position for the flat bar.

hank
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Old 12-14-16, 10:20 AM
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Originally Posted by thehammerdog
.... and there are many mt bike specific drop style bars but the cost close to $100 each.......
GOOD NIGHT! There are drop bars specific to 26in wheeled MTBs!?!

I'm glad no one told me or I would have never done it! click me

in all likelihood i'm probably being a giant menace to myself and society in general....
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Old 12-14-16, 10:33 AM
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I've done that before for a commuter and it worked pretty well once I got a long enough and tall enough stem (going tall brings it back in toward you). If I were to do it again, I'd probably go to velo orange and get some Casey's Crazy bars and put the mtb levers on the swept back parts and put some cyclocross style interupter levers on the ends of the cowhorn parts. That would be cheaper at least. Aw heck, who am I kidding, I'd probably just go full on drop bar conversion again. More expensive, but I spend more time forward and would want the shifters there. I suppose you could do the crazy bar with regular mtb brake levers on the swept back parts, interupter levers near the ends of the cowhorn part and aerobar bar ends on the ends of the cowhorn parts.

Casey's Chromoly Crazy Bar, Noir ($50)
Casey's Crazy Bar ($60)
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Old 12-14-16, 11:44 AM
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You have a picture of the bike?

quill stems are easy to adjust height. But yeah, bikes of that era had super long stems, mine were 120mm.

Do you have v brakes canti? v-brakes aren't going to work with a drop bar.

if you use 700c wheels, how big of a tire can you fit in the Raleigh?
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Old 12-14-16, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by himespau
I've done that before for a commuter and it worked pretty well once I got a long enough and tall enough stem (going tall brings it back in toward you). If I were to do it again, I'd probably go to velo orange and get some Casey's Crazy bars and put the mtb levers on the swept back parts and put some cyclocross style interupter levers on the ends of the cowhorn parts. That would be cheaper at least. Aw heck, who am I kidding, I'd probably just go full on drop bar conversion again. More expensive, but I spend more time forward and would want the shifters there. I suppose you could do the crazy bar with regular mtb brake levers on the swept back parts, interupter levers near the ends of the cowhorn part and aerobar bar ends on the ends of the cowhorn parts.

Casey's Chromoly Crazy Bar, Noir ($50)
Casey's Crazy Bar ($60)
I've been going back and forth between the crazy bars and another drop bar conversion. I think I'll do one of each so I don't need to think about it!
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Old 12-14-16, 12:38 PM
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Originally Posted by chas58
v-brakes aren't going to work with a drop bar.
I'm using these TEKTROs with V-brakes (linear pull) - TEKTRO USA with drop bars (randonneur bars).

- one thing to note - the hoods are really kind of longish. So if you're using drop bars on an old MTB with an already long top tube (my RockHopper is about 59.5cm), it's a long reach.
I resolved this by pulling the levers up the bars, rotating the bars so there's no ramping of the bars (or very little).

https://goo.gl/photos/eWghJGcu5ziZe78r8

cheers!

Last edited by mrv; 12-14-16 at 12:43 PM.
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Old 12-14-16, 12:45 PM
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Originally Posted by chas58
Do you have v brakes canti? v-brakes aren't going to work with a drop bar.
There are a couple ways you can make it work:
1-Using a linear-pull drop bar brake lever like the Tektro RL520
2-Using a Problem Solvers Travel Agent

Last edited by HTupolev; 12-14-16 at 05:13 PM.
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Old 12-14-16, 09:10 PM
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Originally Posted by HTupolev
There are a couple ways you can make it work:
1-Using a linear-pull drop bar brake lever like the Tektro RL520
2-Using a Problem Solvers Travel Agent
I've done both, The RL520 levers is a much better solution. As for a taller, shorter reach stem, the Velo Orange Grand Cru Cigne stem is a great solution if your fork has a threadless steerer.
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Old 12-14-16, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by BluesDawg
As for a taller, shorter reach stem, the Velo Orange Grand Cru Cigne stem is a great solution if your fork has a threadless steerer.
I'm still waiting for their promised quill to threadless adapter that will work with that.
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Old 12-15-16, 01:45 AM
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I've just converted the steerer of an old Kona from threaded to threadless. It was quite easy, but required a bit of welding (the welding it self took no more than 5 minutes). And as for using "Travel Agents" with Shimano brifters and v-brakes I think they work a treat! They are much more powerful and more easily modulated; they are almost on par with the hydro discs of my 29'er.
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Old 12-15-16, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by mrv
I'm using these TEKTROs with V-brakes (linear pull) - TEKTRO USA with drop bars (randonneur bars).

- one thing to note - the hoods are really kind of longish. So if you're using drop bars on an old MTB with an already long top tube (my RockHopper is about 59.5cm), it's a long reach.
I resolved this by pulling the levers up the bars, rotating the bars so there's no ramping of the bars (or very little).

https://goo.gl/photos/eWghJGcu5ziZe78r8

cheers!
So basic road brakes will not work on my cantis? Looks like my cheap transformation will not be cheap....i have nice mt bike newer Gary Fisher 9 speed nice shock was gonna use that one but need to re do disc brakes since they are hydro.
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Old 12-15-16, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by thehammerdog
So basic road brakes will not work on my cantis?
Road brake levers will work with cantilever brakes. Respectable touring bikes and cross bikes ran that way for years. Many still do!
I was running that for a while on my drop bar MTB: https://goo.gl/photos/9WRTKTiMGVMLVLU97

My canti brakes were becoming impossible to adjust due to being about 25 years old. The grooves where the pad-stems would sit were grooved and always went to the wrong spot.

So I got some el-cheapo Origin 8 linear pull brakes and the TEKTRO levers for linear pull brakes.

There's detailed info here: Adjusting Direct-pull Cantilever Bicycle Brakes ("V-Brakes ")
- if you need to read up on the differences.
I have no bikes with disk brakes, so I don't know what brake levers they require.

Hope that helps.
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Old 12-15-16, 10:31 AM
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Road brakes work fine with cantilever brakes, but the pull is different with V-brakes and they need a lever that has a longer cable pull.

Edit: mrv beat me to it and with more detail.
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Old 12-15-16, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by himespau
I'm still waiting for their promised quill to threadless adapter that will work with that.
Your bike shop should be able to get you an adapter. If they don't have one in stock, QBP has them in 1" and 1-1/8" varieties.
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Old 12-15-16, 10:37 PM
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I am using a threaded to threadless stem, Dimension brand, with a short angled stem, 60mm. I have the Origin 8 Tikki bars which are a type of mustache bar and I have Tektra cross brake levers coming. I converted to a 52/42/36 crankset with 170mm cranks. It will be a nine speeder. I am running some Speicalized Nimbus 1.5 inch tires for now.

The mission profile is 14 miles round trip to the Y which includes about 2 miles of gravel and sand road. I may use the bike, with a larger tire such as the Specialized Crossroads 1.9 inch tire for gravel grinding. Since I will have to lock the bike when I swim or lift, I did not want a beauty queen but a purposeful instead steed that might not be super attractive to undesirables.

I understand that cyclecross and road racing bikes are well defined (for decades) in type but MTBs have always been on the wild side and this (relatively) new gravel category is certainly the wild west and I see no reason that a well thought out 26 inch MTB conversion would not be competitive or at least a good choice for fun gravel riding. We will see where it all evolves but I have seen everything from all out dual suspension mtbs to converted road bikes and if anything is king on gravel I would say cyclecross types, but----------, we shall see. I think a cyclecross type bike with a lower BB and longer wheelbase might be better and since getting off and carrying the bike is not an intrinsic part of gravel riding, small, compact frame types (like converted mtbs) should be fine.
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Old 12-16-16, 01:56 AM
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My experience is that you need a much shorter stem when going to drop bars, because the effective reach becomes 5-8 cm longer. You might also need a zero offset (or inverted) seatpost.

Have you seen my conversion: https://www.bikeforums.net/19251182-post36.html
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