Cyclocross and Gravelbiking (Recreational) This has to be the most physically intense sport ever invented. It's high speed bicycle racing on a short off road course or riding the off pavement rides on gravel like :The Dirty Kanza". We also have a dedicated Racing forum for the Cyclocross Hard Core Racers.

Access Old Turnpike Gravel

Old 01-02-17, 03:09 PM
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travbikeman
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Access Old Turnpike Gravel

I checked out the following today:

Access Old Turnpike Gravel Bike - 2017 Performance Exclusive

Didn't get a chance to test ride it due to bad weather. The LBS didn't want anyone riding during the rain. I know it's a Performance Bikes build, not a name brand.

I was confused with the wheels. They don't have a quick release, they require an allen wrench to unscrew them. Is this a new thing?

I figured it was a good price, but chances are I would replace the cassette for one that has a 32 tooth, will this derailleur be able to handle that? Or is it the wrong Tiagra. I would also replace the saddle, which I have and also a better handlebar stem. The one on the bike, would make me reach too far for the handlebar.

I would also replace the cheap brakes for TRP's:

https://www.amazon.com/TRP-HY-Cable-...=trp+hydraulic

Was curious if anyone has this? Does this seem like a good deal? Or is it better to spend a bit more for a better bike?

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Old 01-02-17, 03:52 PM
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Thats an insane deal for $650. Full carbon fork, full 4700 drivetrain, well known rims, and more.

The 4700gs rear derailleur can handle 39t total and a 34t sprocket. So yeah you could just change to an 11-34 cassette and be fine as that would equal 39t toal with the stock crank gearing.

Ive used 4700 components (with mechanical brake) and thought they were fine. I wouldnt hesitate to use them, they should last for years. Sure you could get 105, but is the 1 extra cog going to change much?...i wouldnt think so.
And its a 68mm bsa bottom bracket. Tried and true. Easy to service. No fancy pf30 to creak or cause problems.

$230 for new brakes isnt cheap, but if you need hydraulics and thenstock ones really arent good, you picked some great replacements.
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Old 01-02-17, 03:59 PM
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Originally Posted by mstateglfr View Post
Thats an insane deal for $650. Full carbon fork, full 4700 drivetrain, well known rims, and more.

The 4700gs rear derailleur can handle 39t total and a 34t sprocket. So yeah you could just change to an 11-34 cassette and be fine as that would equal 39t toal with the stock crank gearing.

Ive used 4700 components (with mechanical brake) and thought they were fine. I wouldnt hesitate to use them, they should last for years. Sure you could get 105, but is the 1 extra cog going to change much?...i wouldnt think so.
And its a 68mm bsa bottom bracket. Tried and true. Easy to service. No fancy pf30 to creak or cause problems.

$230 for new brakes isnt cheap, but if you need hydraulics and thenstock ones really arent good, you picked some great replacements.
Thanks...think I'm going to order one tomorrow. Just need to check if I really should get a size 54 rather than a 56.
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Old 01-02-17, 07:56 PM
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Hey Guys, I went to the Performance Bikes with the thought of buying this bike. The one guy there told me that this bike couldn't handle anyone over 210 lbs, stating the fork cannot handle someone larger than this and especially on the Canal trails. Then proceeded to push the more expensive gravel bikes stating they were better built to handle rides like this.

I generally have trusted this shop in the past, but the guys that I typically discuss biking were not there. The guy that told me this, I've caught him once before not knowing his stuff in the past.

What do you all think of this bike being able to handle Canal trails and other rails to trails?

I'm down to 290 lbs and am planning on getting down to 250 pounds by spring. I was actually going to just put this bike on the trainer, with a trainer tire that I have until I get down to around 250 lbs. I was going to continue using my hybrid for the winter rides.
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Old 01-03-17, 06:58 AM
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Tl;dr: I purchased one of these at the end of November 2016 and I love it. It may even replace my current road bike. As said above, at $650 on sale and with the membership points it was a steal. I've seen a few used bikes in the same or slightly better value range, but a used bike doesn't come with Performance's lifetime tuneups and guarantee; and you might have to wait a while for the right size and price to show up.

Some background:

I've been riding seriously for the last 4 years—mostly fast rides on paved rail trails–after a way too long break from track and cross country in HS and college, and a season of serious riding (but not racing) just after college. The first couple of years I used my Cannondale 3.0 criterium geometry bike with 19 and then 25 mm tires (which barely clear the frame). This bike is light and fast, but as a crit bike should be it's stiff and rigid and even with the 25 mm tires it's not a lot of fun on long rides. (Especially with my starting weight of 220 lb, now down to 205.)

This last year I rode a 2009 Giant Defy that I built up myself using the same 25 mm tires and wheels. The Defy has a carbon fork and endurance road geometry so it was a big step up in comfort from the Cannondale while still being a fast bike. I'm hoping to find a 28 mm tire that will squeeze into the frame to make it even more comfortable.

But, my local group also rides gravel once a week and I want to start gravel racing. My old rigid Cannondale 3.0 six speed MTB bike and a borrowed low-end Fuji hybrid just didn't cut it for riding fast on gravel. (Aside: Fuji should be shamed for using such narrow rims with such wide, cheap tires.) The dirt roads where I live are mostly hardpack so I even tried the Defy on a couple of rides. I was able to approximate keeping up with the group on it, but it wasn't a lot of fun and night gravel rides were out of the question. It would probably be a lot better with 28 mm tires as long as it was not wet and muddy, but it was clear that I really needed a true gravel bike.

Last fall I stopped in at a Performance Bike to get some small parts and for the heck of it asked about inexpensive gravel bikes and they showed me the Old Turnpike. After thinking about it for a day I decided to get one and am very happy that I did.

While we were finding the right size for me the salesperson talked about the bike's geometry and what they were trying to accomplish with it, but I have to admit that I was so excited about getting a new bike that I didn't catch what he was saying. But for reference, I'm 6' with about a 33" cycling inseam and I ended up getting a size 52. That was smaller than I expected, but I was after an aggressive riding position and it felt right without having to change the stock stem. After a few hundred miles I'm still happy with the fit.

The Bike

The best I can say about the green/orange frame color is that I can live with it, you may well feel differently.

The alloy frame, full carbon fork, Tiagra 4700 10 speed drivetrain and KMC X11 chain for only $650 speak (shout?) for themselves. They'd be competitive at the list price. (I was a little disappointed that the front derailleur is a clamp-on, but I don't think that it really matters one way or the other.)

The three people who helped me at the Schaumburg, Il Performance Bike store didn't mention any concerns about my weight and the carbon fork.

Performance's website says that the frame doesn't have rack mount points, but it definitely does have them in the rear.

I actually like the inexpensive Velo seat, in fact I like it a lot more than the Prologo Scratch Pro that I have on my road bike. (Which in all fairness is just not the right saddle for me.)

The award winning [1] 32 hole Stans ZTR Grail rims are "optimized" for cyclocross and gravel tires, officially support up to a 40 mm tire (but online charts say that with an interior width of 20 mm that it will take up a 44 mm tire conservatively and that you could probably go with a 47 mm—though I don't think that it would fit in the frame.), are aero'ish at 24.5 mm deep, and are tubeless ready. Jenson USA lists the maximum rider weight as 250 lb for the 32 hole version. They list for $100 each.

The Schwalbe P G-One 35 mm tires are a decent moderately priced tire with a micro tread pattern that is a good compromise for paved and hardpack dirt roads. I'm going to live with them till they wear out unless I find that I need a faster tire for paved group rides, I enter a race that needs a more aggressive tread or I decide to go tubeless.

Together I think that they're a big step up from what you'd normally find on a $650 bike and are still a step up from what a lot of bikes at the list price would have. (I don't know anything about the Formula hubs, perhaps others can comment on them.)

As to the Promax Render-R mechanical disk brakes: These are the most disappointing part on the bike and they are definitely not up to par with the other parts. Online they get mixed reviews that lean negative. That being said, these are my first disc brakes and so far I have to say that they are at least adequate and that I have no plans to change them in the foreseeable future—though that may change if they turn out to be a pain to maintain and adjust. The commonly recommended big step up upgrade is the SRAM AVID BB7 (skipping over the also mixed reviewed BB5) which can be found on eBay for a little over $100 a pair or about $150 a pair at most online stores.

My road bike has a 175 mm 53/39 front crank and an 8 speed 12-25 rear cassette. So far the I'm happy with the supplied 170 mm 50/34 crank and 10 speed 12-28 cassette.

My only current concern is whether or not I'll be able to use 40 or 41 mm tires in the future. Measuring with a ruler says yes, especially up front, but I won't know for sure until I try.

The Ride

As I said above, I love this bike. It's the best and most fun bike I've ever ridden. [2] Even with the endurance geometry, carbon fork and 25 mm tires, paved trail seams, bumps and debris are pretty jarring on my Defy road bike—especially given the tire pressures that I have to use for my weight. The Turnpike's 35mm tires and the lower pressure that they allow are a revelation. The ride is stable without being boring. A 35 MPH descent was handled with aplomb. It has a versatility that my Cannondale 3.0 or Defy road bikes can't come close to: I feel as fast on it as I do on my road bikes and I no longer care if the road gets bumpy or turns to dirt, or if the rail trail has seams or turns to limestone that hasn't been well maintained, I just keep riding, grinning all the way.

In short: Happy, happy, happy—Recommended, with both thumbs up. This will probably replace all of my existing bikes, making room for a fat tire bike and a 29er suspension MTB.


[1] Road.cc 2015 Best Cycling Components

[2] Besides the bikes I mentioned above, I have or had a Peugeot PX-10, a Columbus SL tubed road racing bike, a first generation fat tubed Cannondale, a first generation BikeE recumbent, a long wheelbase Linear recumbent and a high end upright trike.

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Old 01-03-17, 07:41 AM
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At 290 lb you're definitely over the stated 250 lb limit of the Stan's rims, but if you upgraded to 40 mm tires you'd probably be OK as long as you're careful about dropping off curbs, etc. See the Stan's page about tire pressure limitations and tire width.

As to the carbon fork, find a knowledgeable person at a Performance Bike store and ask them. But be careful, some are excellent and others not so much.
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Old 01-03-17, 08:48 AM
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Originally Posted by pjrobar View Post
At 290 lb you're definitely over the stated 250 lb limit of the Stan's rims, but if you upgraded to 40 mm tires you'd probably be OK as long as you're careful about dropping off curbs, etc. See the Stan's page about tire pressure limitations and tire width.

As to the carbon fork, find a knowledgeable person at a Performance Bike store and ask them. But be careful, some are excellent and others not so much.
Thanks, I have some nice 36 spoke mountain bike wheelset with 38mm tires that I'm currently using on my hybrid. I was just going to switch those over to this bike until I lose the weight. Or may just put this bike on the trainer until then as well.

I'm just worried about the fork. If the fork can handle me and the canal trails, then I'm getting this. I'm contacting several Performance Bikes to get a variety of opinions since I'm not really trusting the guy I spoke to last night. He kept pushing for me to go for one of the bikes they have in stock.
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Old 01-03-17, 09:15 PM
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Nice looking bike for the cost.....Crazy good deal
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Old 01-04-17, 04:01 PM
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Another thought for a brake upgrade: Clarks' M2 Hydraulic brakes have some good reviews online and are only $50 for a set.
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Old 01-04-17, 06:45 PM
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Originally Posted by pjrobar View Post
Another thought for a brake upgrade: Clarks' M2 Hydraulic brakes have some good reviews online and are only $50 for a set.
Those do look like a good set and do have good reviews. The problem is I would have to get new brake levers and that significantly raises the cost.
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Old 01-06-17, 04:04 PM
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Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
Those do look like a good set and do have good reviews. The problem is I would have to get new brake levers and that significantly raises the cost.
Yup, I'm new to disc brakes and it didn't occur to me until after I posted that there has to be a piston and cylinder in the brake handle, which a mechanical brake lever wouldn't have.

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Old 01-12-17, 12:57 PM
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The sizing seems crazy. I'm a 56cm in most every bike but judging by the crazy long ETT I would need a 52cm? Is that right?
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Old 01-16-17, 09:11 AM
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Originally Posted by shoota View Post
The sizing seems crazy. I'm a 56cm in most every bike but judging by the crazy long ETT I would need a 52cm? Is that right?
In another discussion on this site someone mentioned that he took back the 56 cm he bought for a 54.

As I said I'm 6' with a 33" cycling inseam and I went with a 52—there was no way that a shorter stem was going to make me comfortable on the 56 I tried. I'm still a little more stretched out than I think I want to be and will probably try a shorter stem since I have a few laying around.

I wish I could remember what the manager at the Performance where I purchased mine said about the geometry design goals of the bike, but as I said I was so excited about getting a new bike that I missed it.

I think the short answer is yes, you'll probably want a smaller size than you usually get.
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Old 01-16-17, 02:31 PM
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Originally Posted by pjrobar View Post
In another discussion on this site someone mentioned that he took back the 56 cm he bought for a 54.

As I said I'm 6' with a 33" cycling inseam and I went with a 52—there was no way that a shorter stem was going to make me comfortable on the 56 I tried. I'm still a little more stretched out than I think I want to be and will probably try a shorter stem since I have a few laying around.

I wish I could remember what the manager at the Performance where I purchased mine said about the geometry design goals of the bike, but as I said I was so excited about getting a new bike that I missed it.

I think the short answer is yes, you'll probably want a smaller size than you usually get.
Yeah it sure seems like it, thanks for the confirmation.
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Old 01-21-17, 09:51 PM
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Just got one after a ton of different discounts, I got it for $529.

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Old 01-22-17, 07:01 PM
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Originally Posted by kshapero View Post
Just got one after a ton of different discounts, I got it for $529.

I'm curious how you got those discounts?

Thanks! That is a good looking bike.
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Old 01-23-17, 04:32 AM
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Originally Posted by travbikeman View Post
I'm curious how you got those discounts?

Thanks! That is a good looking bike.
Quoted sale price was $649. Had a $50 off coupon. Then at the cash out they offered me a 2 year tune up coupon for $70 which they said would be rebated back to me in a day or so. Boom $529. (I think my math is good).
Color is an acquired taste but I like it. Read over the specs. This is the equivalent to a $1200 bike from anywhere else. Crazy
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Old 01-24-17, 05:59 PM
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The Access Old Turnpike Gravel Bike (from performance bike) is a nice bike. I bought mine earlier this month.

Well constructed with a stiff alloy frame and a matt finish green and orange paint scheme. With a dual Shimano Tiagra 10-spd group set, the bike shifts smoothly. But don't be mistaken... it does not have the climbing ability of a triple or a mountain bike.

The sizing isn't exactly either road bike-like or mountain bike-like. It is a long-ish bike. You can read the size-specs at the Performance catalog Site. I normally prefer (and own a few) 56cm bikes. With the "Old Turnpike" I purchased a 54. I ordered a new (10mm) shorter stem from China... but I don't think I'll need it. I ordered the stem based on measurements... but now having had a chance to actually ride the bike... I can report it felt great.

The bike came with platform pedals with toe cages. I like the look and am old enough to be comfortable with cages. But the rear stays/triangle seem abnormally wide and my foot slipped around just enough that my heel tapped the rear stay. But with my normal mountain bike clipless pedals and shoes.... everything is fine. I think any wide rear-end... might have all been in my mind.

Those wide 700X35 tires... are plush. They roll nice. I never felt bogged down with resistance either, but bumps disappeared. I am sure the full carbon fork helped too.
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Old 01-24-17, 06:30 PM
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Originally Posted by pjrobar View Post
In another discussion on this site someone mentioned that he took back the 56 cm he bought for a 54.
........, you'll probably want a smaller size than you usually get.
I am the guy that had mentioned... I originally bought a 56 cm. The shop had to order it in for me. The sales guy was certain that my normal size would be the correct size with this bike.... he was wrong. They had the 54 cm in stock so switching out the bikes wasn't such a big deal.

Size and fit is really important to me. So I was concerned when I realized that the 56 cm wasn't going to work for me. But the 54 cm works fine. I feel really comfortable with my Gravel bike selection. I am older and a bit arthritic... so the next smaller size (52 cm) was just a bit too aggressive for me.

How much gravel I get to ride on... or how often I even get near gravel.... is a whole different question. But I've been in the snow... and the bike was great. I didn't have anything I was comfortable on when riding on snow before. And I know now from experience that wet streets are better with disc brakes too. So now I am ahead of the game.
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Old 01-24-17, 07:37 PM
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I usually ride a 56 but based on this thread I went for the 54 and it fits fine (6 ft, 200 lbs). Went graveling today (first time) held up fine. Of course it is not a mountain bike (no mountains or even hills here in south Florida, anyway.) Almost feels like a road bike but really handles off road fine. My first purpose built gravel road bike. What an idea? Still wondering how it could be so cheap, but it is.
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Old 02-08-17, 09:10 PM
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I am looking at this bike also. They are not in stock but can be ordered in.
I'm 5'10" with a 31" inseam. I generally ride a 56cm frame when is a level top tube. All these sloping top tube bikes confuse me in regard to sizing.
All thats left is 50cm and 54cm. Will the 54cm be correct? I hope to have it fit more road bike than mtn bike. I don't want a tiny frame with max extended seat post & looong stem.
Will a 54cm do it??? Thanks.
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Old 02-09-17, 02:14 AM
  #22  
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Originally Posted by Maxacceleration View Post
I am looking at this bike also. They are not in stock but can be ordered in.
I'm 5'10" with a 31" inseam. ...Will a 54cm do it??? Thanks.
I'd guess.... you'd want to order in a 52. The design and tires raise the BB giving them a higher stand-over height. They are also a long(er). You could also compare the frame measurements in the spec tab... to your bike(s).
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Old 02-09-17, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by Dave Cutter View Post
I'd guess.... you'd want to order in a 52. The design and tires raise the BB giving them a higher stand-over height. They are also a long(er). You could also compare the frame measurements in the spec tab... to your bike(s).
Thanks Dave, and drats... They are out of the 52cm, or at least showing that way online (50 or 54cm available). I missed the specs tab, thanks for that.
How much standover clearance should there be for the average gravel bike?
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Old 02-09-17, 06:33 AM
  #24  
danimal92sport
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Three questions for you all:

1. Has anyone weighed this bike?
2. Is there a front fender eyelet on the fork?
3. How wide of a tire will this thing fit with and without fenders? I'm looking for
40c capability with fenders, but I have a feeling this one won't do that.

Thanks,
Dan
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Old 02-09-17, 06:57 AM
  #25  
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Originally Posted by Maxacceleration View Post
..... How much standover clearance should there be for the average gravel bike?
That's a tough one. It's almost like what's the proper way to oil a chain.

Some say... there should be an inch of space between the bar and yourself. Others say bull*** to that. I am NO expert. My 54cm, by my measurement, has a 32inch stand-over.... which just happens to be my (cycling) inseam. So when standing over the center bar... I can feel/tell there is a bar there... but to no consequence.

Don't worry.... if the gravel bike sold well... Performance will have MORE.

I was able to throw a leg over a 52 at the store. And for me (slightly over 6 foot)... and an old arthritic guy... the 52 was slightly too aggressive. Maybe a 53 (of course there is no 53) would have been perfect.

But IMHO... fit is primary. I worried a bit about mine being a decent fit until I got in a good ride (I've had bronchus). I had figured I could cut (slam) the stem to lower it on the 54 if need be (it wasn't). The handlebar is about even with the saddle (Or maybe a tad high) but I like it. Reach is important... and stems can always be replaced (The 54 comes with a 100mm). I ordered in a shorter stem from China... but I don't think I'll need it (I jumped the gun on that).
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